• XI Armonia International Olive Oil Competition

    The International Olive Oil Competition Armonia the first and only Olive Oil Competition that encourages restaurateurs, caterers, chefs and young chefs, foodbloggers enthusiasts and consumers to expand their knowledge about the “EVOO of Excellence” and the new “alternative use” for increasing consumption in the kitchen and on the table.

    XI International Olive Oil Competition ARMONIA – Trophy 2017

    Enrollments are now open!

    Download rules and application form – ENG

    Descarga reglamento y formulario de inscription – ESP

    Scarica il regolamento e il modulo di iscrizione – ITA

    Armonia Trophy is the first and only Olive Oil Competition that encourages restaurateurs, caterers, chefs and young chefs, foodbloggers, enthusiasts and consumers to expand their knowledge about the “EVOO of Excellence” and the new “alternative use” for increasing consumption in the kitchen and on the table.

    This competition has found its strength in the transparency, objectivity and impartiality of juries, also thanks to the presence of a notary that guarantees the anonymity of the samples until the end of the selections.

    International Olive Oil Competition ARMONIA is divided into various sections:

    • ARMONIA Olive Oil CompetitionSensory Competition
    • ARMONIE IN THE KITCHEN Cooking Competition
    • ARMONIA PackagingGraphic Design and Communicative Impact Competition
    • ARMONIA People’s ChoiceCompetition with People’s Choice Judging Panel

    All of the prize-winning oils will by entitlement feature in the “The Best Of” website section of the International Olive Oil Acadamy.

    INFO: Segreteria Concorso Oleario Internazionale “Armonia”

    via Nursina 2, 06049  SPOLETO (PG) Italy

    Ph. + 39 0521 184 1531 – Mob:+39 338 53 94 663 – Fax: + 39 0521 148 0029

    info@oliveoilacademy.org – www.oliveoilacademy.org  – www.irvea.org

    Download: program & application

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    The International Olive Oil Competition Armonia the first and only Olive Oil Competition that encourages restaurateurs, caterers, chefs and young chefs, foodbloggers enthusiasts and consumers to expand their knowledge about the “EVOO of Excellence” and the new “alternative... 
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  • Olive Oil events and Fairs during 2016

    2016 starts with the Winter Fancy Food Show, which will be held from 17 to 19 January in San Francisco, being an exclusive showcase which will display all types of delicatessen food such as extra virgin olive oil.

    Later on that same month, Milan will host once again Olio Officina Festival, a cultural event created by writer and editor of Olio Officina Magazine, Luigi Caricato. The fifth edition of this event will take place from 21 to 23 January in the Palazzo delle Stelline of the Italian city.

    In the capital of Spain the International Tourism Trade Fair, Fitur, will take place from 20 to 24 January. This event will become once again a global meeting point for tourism professionals. As every year, Fitur will focuss, among other areas, in the olive grove culture and the excellence of extra virgin olive oil, hosting various promotional activities of this key food of the Mediterranean Diet.

    Subsequently, Madrid Fusion will take place in the same Spanish city. The International Summit of Gastronomy will return to the Congress Palace of Nations between 25 and 27 January, with countless presentations, demonstrations, master workshops, tastings and lectures focussed on the new trends of author cuisine.

    Also in February -after the organization of major events such as Prodexpo (from 8 to 12), reference event in the Russian market- BioFach will take place, the world’s largest platform dedicated to the organic sector in the Nuremberg’s Exhibition Centre from 10 to 13 of February. In this month, will host FIMA (days 16 to 20 in Zaragoza); Gulfood (days 21 to 25 in Dubai); and Olipremium (22 February in Madrid).

    March will be completed with the celebration of World Olive Oil Exhibition (days 2 to 3 in Madrid); Olio Capitale (days 5 to 8 in Trieste, Italy); Foodex Japan (from days 8 to 11 in Tokyo, Japan); Gastro Vision (days 11 to 15 in Hamburg, Germany); AoveSol (from days 11 to 13 in Torremolinos, Spain); and ExpoANTAD & Alimentaria Mexico (days 16 to 18 in Guadalajara, Mexico).

    Meanwhile, April will host important international events such Salon de Gourmets (between 4 and 7 in Madrid), the largest annual gathering dedicated to quality products, including extra virgin olive oil; SOL & Agrifood (from 10 to 13 in Verona, Italy); SIAL Canada (from 13 to 15 April in Montreal); World Food Warsaw (19 to 21); Olivtech (27 to 30 in Izmir, Turkey), Ovibeja (21 to 25 in Beja, Portugal); Alimentaria (25 to 28 in Bracelona, Spain); and SIAM (from 27 April to 1 May in Meknes, Morocco).

    May will also have a strong international focus with interesting exhibitions dedicated to the olive oil sector such as SIAL China (5 to 7 in Shanghai); CIBUS (9 to 12 in Parma); Luxe Pack New York (11 to 12 in New York); Oil China (18 to 19 in Beijing); and PLMA (24 to 25 in Amsterdam). In Spain, Montoro (Cordoba) will host once again between days 11 to 14 the XVIII edition of Feria del Olivo de Montoro.

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    2016 starts with the Winter Fancy Food Show, which will be held from 17 to 19 January in San Francisco, being an exclusive showcase which will display all types of delicatessen food such as extra virgin olive oil. Later on that same month, Milan will host once again Olio Officina... 
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  • Fifth edition of the International Forum dedicated to the Mediterranean Diet

    The European Room of the European Union (EU) Pavilion in Expo Milano 2015 hosted last September 18th the fifth edition of the International Forum dedicated to the Mediterranean Diet, included among the events of the Mediterranean Diet Week organized by the Italian Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies (MIPAAF).

    The Forum, attended by leading experts in this area, focused on many aspects of the Mediterranean diet not only as culture and lifestyle, but also in the potential development of sustainable business linked to this type of food.

    Among the participants, highlighted Tullio Scovazzi, Professor of International Law at the University of Milan-Bicocca; Elisa de Cabo de la Vega, general secretary of the Spanish Ministry of Culture; Pier Luigi Petrillo, associate professor of Comparative Public Law at the University of Roma-La Sapienza Unitelma; Jelena Ivanisevic, from the Research Institute of Ethnology and Folklore of Croatia; Massimo Conio, director of the Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy at the Hospital of San Remo; and Riccardo Garosci, chairman of the Nutrition and Education Italian Ministry.

    Representatives of the Mediterranean Olive Oil Cities Network (Re.C.O.Med), including the Spanish Association of Olive Municipalities (AEMO), also participated.

    The Network came into being in Imperia on the 18th of November 2011 during the first edition of the Mediterranean Diet Forum. It is a network of the olive oil towns of the Mediterranean. Italy, Albania, Croatia, Greece, Israel, Morocco, Montenegro, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Tunisia and Turkey are the 12 founder members. Lebanon was granted membership during the 2nd edition of the Forum, on 16th of November 2012.

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    The European Room of the European Union (EU) Pavilion in Expo Milano 2015 hosted last September 18th the fifth edition of the International Forum dedicated to the Mediterranean Diet, included among the events of the Mediterranean Diet Week organized by the Italian Ministry of... 
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  • Eat olive oil and watch football: alternative ways to help Greece

    Whatever your views on the Greek crisis, watching the gradual implosion of a country leaves many of us wishing there was something we could do to help. But unless you’re a billionaire, or ideally a multibillionaire, your power is limited. If you are determined to make some sort of difference, however, no matter how small, here are some suggestions.

    Want to help Greece? Go there on holiday
    santorini2

    Buy Greek
    In one sense, it isn’t complicated. Greeks need money right now, and may soon need euros especially (or even pounds), so it would help a lot if you bought Greek things. For instance, you might choose to get your cosmetics from companies such as Apivita, Fisika or Korres, drink Fix or Vergina beer (and snigger slightly while doing so), or get your olives and olive oil from producers including Threpsi, Abea, Gaea or direct from a small producer, such as those on greekoliveoildirect.com.

    A bit of caveat emptor is needed too, however. Some Greek businesses may go bankrupt soon, and if you order something direct from a Greek company just before they do, you may never get what you paid for. It may therefore be safer to buy from a British importer – assuming they are still ordering things from Greece themselves. You might also want to boycott “Greek-style” yoghurt in favour of the real thing.

    Tackle their smoking problem
    It is tempting to wonder whether there is a self-destructive streak in the Greek national character, if you believe in national characters, since the world’s most famous bankrupt state is also one of the heaviest-smoking. More than 40% of Greek adults smoke, more than double the rate in the UK, with all the attendant costs for the Greek economy and healthcare system – not that many long-term unemployed Greeks have any healthcare now, not unless they can pay for it. This is complicated, however, – it is the seventh largest tobacco grower and sixth largest exporter in the world, an industry that employs thousands of people. Overseas smokers are therefore contributing valuable euros to the Greek economy, and will become still more valuable as a source of hard currency in the event of a Grexit. This in turn may drive up the domestic tobacco price, make smoking suddenly more expensive for Greeks, perhaps leading many to quit. Maybe the best course, therefore, is to buy mountains of cigarettes made with Greek tobacco (Philip Morris has a big plant there) – and burn them on a bonfire.

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    Whatever your views on the Greek crisis, watching the gradual implosion of a country leaves many of us wishing there was something we could do to help. But unless you’re a billionaire, or ideally a multibillionaire, your power is limited. If you are determined to make some... 
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  • Recipe: Olive Oil Raspberry and Sea Salt Brownies

    Olive Oil Raspberry and Sea Salt Brownies

    INGREDIENTS
    •  ¼ cup Extra Light Tasting Olive Oil
    •  8 ounces bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
    •  ¾ cup granulated sugar
    •  2 large eggs
    •  1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    •  ¼ cup all-purpose flour
    •  2 teaspoons espresso powder
    • ¼ teaspoon baking powder
    • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
    •  1 cup fresh raspberries
    •  ½ cup coarsely chopped pecans (optional)
    •  coarse or flaked sea salt for finishing

    INSTRUCTIONS
    1. Place rack in the upper third of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

    2. Line a 8x8inch brownie pan with parchment paper, allowing excess paper to hang over 2 sides of the pan, making the brownies easier to remove. Spray the pan and paper with nonstick cooking spray.

    3. In a medium, heat-proof bowl set over a pot of simmering water, warm the olive oil and bittersweet chocolate together over low heat, stirring until the chocolate is completely melted and smooth.

    4. Remove from the heat and stir in the sugar. Beat the eggs in one at a time. Add the vanilla and beat until sugar is dissolved and mixture is smooth and glossy. Add the flour, espresso powder, baking powder and salt and whisk until the batter again becomes smooth and shiny.

    5.Scrape the batter into the prepared brownie pan and sprinkle with raspberries, pecans (if using), and a small amount of flaked sea salt. Place in the oven and bake for approximately 30 minutes, or until cooked through but still gooey.

    6. Remove from the oven and allow to rest in the pan for 30 minutes before slicing. Enjoy with another sprinkling of sea salt!

    recipe source

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    Olive Oil Raspberry and Sea Salt Brownies INGREDIENTS •  ¼ cup Extra Light Tasting Olive Oil •  8 ounces bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped •  ¾ cup granulated sugar •  2 large eggs •  1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract •  ¼ cup all-purpose flour •  2... 
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  • OLIVE JAPAN 2015 International Olive Oil Competition Winners

    The competition, organized by The Olive Oil Sommelier Association of Japan (OSAJ) was the starting point of a week of activities dedicated to olive oil, which took place in Tokyo between 14 and 19 April. The event brings together each year Japanese consumers and expert tasters from around the world, with the participation of the main olive oil producers, as well as international and Japanese producers and manufacturers.

    OLIVE JAPAN is an annual comprehensive open-air event that brings olive oil producers and their products together with consumers and the trade. It is held the weekend in April after each year’s OLIVE JAPAN International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition, Symposium and Seminar events.

    Olive Japan 2014
    Olive Japan 2014

    •The Venue – FutakoTamagawa is up-scale, but enjoys proximity to major parks and the Tama River with its broad, wide-open banks. For a Tokyo suburb the area also has a high percentage of green spaces such as smaller parks and tree-lined avenues. Because it is an aspirational area, it is the perfect place to host an event that brings olives and olive oil to the urban life style of modern Japanese people.
    •In addition to directly interacting with consumers and influencers in the food world, OLIVE JAPAN provides a precious opportunity to communicate the potential of the Japanese market to international businesses, and support promotional activities to help these businesses expand their presence in Japan.
    •The organizer is the Olive Oil Sommelier Association of Japan(OSAJ), Japan’s sole professional organization for training and certifying olive oil experts, which is independent from any commercial body of the olive and olive oil.

    OLIVE-JAPAN-2015-International-Olive-Oil-Competition
    441 Olive Oil Registrations in OLIVE JAPAN 2015 Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition results in  12 Premier, 152 Gold and 134 Silver

    Follow link for  Competition Results OLIVE JAPAN 2015

    The OLIVE JAPAN International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition
    is one of the premier olive oil competitions in the world, bringing together the highest standards of integrity and professionalism in awarding medals to the best oils from around the globe.

    This is the forth year of OLIVE JAPAN International Competition, Japan as the one of the most important market for olive oil in the world. The judges are invited from key major olive oil production countries and Japan, under recommendation by the Olive Oil Sommelier Association of Japan. (OSAJ)

    This Competition will be held as a key program in the “OLIVE JAPAN 2015” trade show and winners will be prized at the main event of this trade show, and will be carried by major papers and trade magazines. The competition is committed to educating the public about extra virgin olive oil, featuring industry experts with extensive knowledge about selection, tasting and food pairings.

    The OLIVE JAPAN International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition and its panel of tasters invite you to participate in the third annual competition open to extra virgin olive oils and flavored olive oils throughout the world.

    Organizing Body
    The Olive Oil Sommelier Association of Japan (OSAJ)
    Kyobashi3-4-1 Takai-building Chuou-ku, Tokyo 104-0031
    FAX:+81-3-3272-8755
    EMAIL : info@oliveoil.or.jp
    WEBSITE: http://olivejapan.com/en/competition

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    The competition, organized by The Olive Oil Sommelier Association of Japan (OSAJ) was the starting point of a week of activities dedicated to olive oil, which took place in Tokyo between 14 and 19 April. The event brings together each year Japanese consumers and expert tasters... 
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  • Prediction of the antioxidant activity of extra virgin olive oils produced in the Mediterranean area

    A chemical characterisation was conducted on 75 commercial extra virgin olive oils (EVOO) produced in the years 2011-2012 in Southern Italy from five different olive monovarieties (Coratina, Leccino, Maiatica, Ogliarola del Vulture and Ogliarola del Bradano).

    The possibility of estimating the antioxidant activity of EVOO by using a chemical index as predictor of this property was considered. In order to build up and validate an antioxidant activity predictive model, the relationship between the antioxidant activity and the chosen chemical parameters was systematically investigated.

    The results indicated that oil antioxidant activity, measured as IC50, could be satisfactorily predicted, for olive oils from the considered region, by using a simple index, such as the K225 value of oil samples, which represents a spectrophotometric index of the compounds responsible for oil bitterness measured at 225 nm.

    Author information
    1School of Agricultural, Forestry, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy.
    2School of Agricultural, Forestry, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy. Electronic address: fernanda.galgano@unibas.it.
    3Department of Sciences, University of Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy.
    4Department of Biotechnology, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona, Italy.

    Information source

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    A chemical characterisation was conducted on 75 commercial extra virgin olive oils (EVOO) produced in the years 2011-2012 in Southern Italy from five different olive monovarieties (Coratina, Leccino, Maiatica, Ogliarola del Vulture and Ogliarola del Bradano). The possibility... 
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  • A journey into 'Virgin Territory' and recipe: Soupy Spanish Rice with Clams and EVOO

    American consumers spend hundreds of millions of dollars each year on extra-virgin olive oil alone, and we are generally on the same page about the notion that it’s a healthful fat. Yet we know less about it, and about olive oil in general, than we should. Only one in four of us is aware that the oil does not improve with age, and 85 percent of us think “light olive oil” has fewer calories than other olive oils, according to a recent study. (For the record, the designation refers to refined olive oil with little aroma or flavor.)

    The research results are reason enough for Nancy Harmon Jenkins to have written “Virgin Territory: Exploring the World of Olive Oil” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, February 2015). More significantly, the respected author and historian is passionate about the subject, and clearly fascinated by it. She has spent four decades cooking, learning, sampling, touring, harvesting her own olives and trying to vanquish misperceptions about the oil. (Yes, Virginia, you can fry in extra-virgin olive oil.)

    This is her seventh cookbook, with much to offer, including her well-written, mostly Mediterranean-based recipes. There are the expected Great Moments in olive oil history, because Jenkins is recognized as an expert in the field and likes to share information. The chapters on the process of making oil and the science around the ingredient are in layman’s terms.

    Her explanation of why we should care about identifying what is truly “extra-virgin” is presented without hyperbole. Such oil is extracted and processed without chemical treatment and refining; it contains no more than 0.8 grams of oleic acid per 100 grams of oil, and it must be free of defective flavors and aromas. It does not necessarily come from a first pressing. Its combination of polyphenols is said to be the most healthful of all olive oils.

    Jenkins’ bottom line: Rely on taste more than labels.

    To that end, she walks readers through how to taste olive oils and the language with which to describe them, preferably at a venue where you can sample more than one or two at a time. Beyond calling for extra-virgin olive oil in a preface to the recipes — a matter of style that might not get picked up by less-careful readers — Jenkins does not specify particular types of olive oils for certain dishes. But she does list reliable sources and brands, including Costco’s Kirkland Signature Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and Trader Joe’s Kalamata Extra-Virgin Olive Oil from Greece.

    One oil for cooking and one for finishing are all that is needed in a discerning home cook’s kitchen. Proper storage is more crucial, she says, meaning keep it out of the refrigerator and away from the heat of a nearby stove or microwave.

    RECIPE: SOUPY SPANISH RICE WITH CLAMS with extra-virgin olive oil

    In this version of the Catalan dish, the clams are cooked separately in their shells to keep sand or grit from settling into the rice.
    The recipe calls for an unsmoked Spanish paprika; if you can’t find it, use Aleppo pepper or piment d’Espelette instead.
    Serve with crusty bread.

    Make ahead: The saffron needs to steep for at least 1 hour.

    Pinch saffron threads INGREDIENTS:
    1/2 cup warm water, plus 2 cups boiling water
    1-1/2 pounds shell-on littleneck or Manila clams
    1 to 1-1/2 cups dry white wine, or more as needed
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 large onion, chopped
    1 pound peeled, chopped tomatoes
    3 cloves garlic, crushed
    1 sweet red bell pepper, seeded and diced
    1 sweet green bell pepper, seeded and diced
    3 sprigs thyme
    1/2 teaspoon mild Spanish paprika (pimenton; see headnote)
    3/4 cup short-grain rice, such as Valencia or Arborio
    Sea salt
    1/2 cup minced flat-leaf parsley

    DIRECTIONS:
    Combine the saffron and the 1/2 cup of warm water in a small stain-proof bowl; steep for at least 1 hour.

    Discard any clams that do not close when gently tapped. Place the remaining clams in a large saucepan. Add enough wine to fill to about 1 inch at the bottom of the pot. Cook over medium heat just until the clams open, transferring them to a bowl as soon as they do. Discard any clams that fail to open.

    Strain the cooking liquid through a double or triple layer of cheesecloth into a small saucepan to remove any grit. If the clams are grit-free, leave some of them in their shells (it makes a nice presentation when the dish is ready); otherwise, shuck the clams and keep them warm in the strained cooking liquid over low heat.

    Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the onion, tomatoes, garlic and peppers; cook for 6 to 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes start to dissolve and soften. Add the saffron and its soaking water, then stir in the thyme and paprika.

    Add the reserved clam cooking liquid; cook for 5 minutes, then add the rice, the 2 cups of boiling water and 1/8 to ¼ teaspoon of the salt. Cook, uncovered, for about 15 minutes; the rice should soften yet still be fairly firm.

    Stir in the cooked clams; cook for about 5 minutes, then remove from the heat. Cover and let sit for 5 minutes, allowing the rice to finish cooking. Discard the thyme sprigs, then stir in the parsley. Serve warm.

    Nutrition per serving: 410 calories, 20 grams protein, 31 grams carbohydrates, 19 grams fat, 3 grams saturated fat, 35 milligrams cholesterol, 740 milligrams sodium, 3 grams dietary fiber, 5 grams sugar

    Servings: 6

    source

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    American consumers spend hundreds of millions of dollars each year on extra-virgin olive oil alone, and we are generally on the same page about the notion that it’s a healthful fat. Yet we know less about it, and about olive oil in general, than we should. Only one in four... 
    Read More →
  • Sol d'Oro Southern Hemisphere is scheduled next autumn for olive oils from the New World

    This year’s competition in Verona focuses exclusively on olive oils from the Northern Hemisphere, with samples entered from Italy as well as Spain, Greece, Croatia, Slovenia, Portugal and Turkey. A panel of 13 international judges at work. Sol d’Oro Southern Hemisphere is scheduled next autumn for olive oils from the New World.

    Boom for entries from Italy, Spain, Greece, Croatia, Slovenia, Portugal and Turkey for the Sol d’Oro Northern Hemisphere Competition. Work for the most important international olive oil competition in the world as regards product quality entered for the event organised by Veronafiere begins today and will continue until 19 February. Almost 250 samples have been entered, in line with last year’s performance when New World products were still involved – and in particular Chile alone accounted for more than one third of total entries. As of September 2014, olive oils from the production campaign that begins in Spring are covered by the Sol d’Oro Southern Hemisphere Competition scheduled in the Autumn.

    “Growth in the number of samples entered,” says Damiano Berzacola, Vice-President of Veronafiere “above all confirms Sol d’Oro and its two editions as the landmark international competition for quality extra virgin olive oil. Secondly, it ensures excellent support for the value of Italian production, which last year posted one of the poorest harvests for some considerable time.”

    There are five competition categories: light fruity, medium fruity, intense fruity, single variety and organic; and three awards in each category: Sol d’Oro, Sol d’Argento and Sol di Bronzo (Gold, Silver and Bronze). The top 20 samples of extra virgin olive oil achieving a score equal to or higher than 70/90 from the tasting jury will receive Special Mention diplomas. Extra virgin olive oils, after they have been rendered anonymous, are assessed in “blind tastings” by a qualified international Jury of 13 judges from Italy, Greece, Spain, Slovenia and Turkey.

    Medal-winning oils will be entitled to affix the Sol d’Oro seal to bottles attesting to the prize awarded and acknowledged product quality.

    They will also be included in the “Sol d’Oro Stars” guidebook with the technical data cards drawn up by the judges. As a tool designed to help promote the best olive oils in a marketing key, the guidebook is distributed to buyers and Veronafiere’s international delegates during Sol&Agrifood, scheduled 22-25 March 2015 (www.solagrifood.com) as well as being made available on the event’s website. During Sol&Agrifood itself, it will be possible to taste the olive oils winning prizes in the Sol d’Oro Northern Hemisphere Competition 2015 as well as the winners of the Southern Hemisphere 2014 event in the Olive Oil Bar created in collaboration with Onaoo, the national organization of olive oil tasters.

    For further information:
    Tel: + 39.045.829.82.42 – 82.85 – 82.10
    E-mail: pressoffice@veronafiere.it
    www.solagrifood.com

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    This year’s competition in Verona focuses exclusively on olive oils from the Northern Hemisphere, with samples entered from Italy as well as Spain, Greece, Croatia, Slovenia, Portugal and Turkey. A panel of 13 international judges at work. Sol d’Oro Southern Hemisphere... 
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