• Recipe by Marc Jacobs’s personal chef: Celeriac Soup with Olive Oil

    As the brisk winds of fall ease into winter, we begin to crave warmth—and one tasty solution comes in the form of a hot, hearty soup. It can be tough, however, to strike the right balance between richness and nourishment, which is why we turned to Lauren Gerrie, cofounder of BigLittle Get Together and Marc Jacobs’s personal chef, for her expert advice.

    “Soups are kind of limitless and so versatile,” says Gerrie, who’s been cooking professionally for 10 years now. “People are realizing how satisfying a good soup can be when it’s jam-packed with protein, fiber, and greens.” Jacobs, for his part, loves a hearty chicken and vegetable soup—“I make it for him all the time!”—and Gerrie often seasons her broths with fresh herbs, chilies, and spices, which bring added nutrition “and generate heat in these cold, cold months.”

    Though all her soup stocks are painstakingly made from scratch, Gerrie happily shared three quick and easy recipes, each one Marc Jacobs tested and approved. From a creamy carrot ginger to a clever faux pho, these three healthy recipes are sure to keep you warm—and fashionably fed—all season long.

    Celeriac Soup

    “This recipe can be done with any type of nondairy milk: coconut, rice, cashew, et cetera. It can also be done with dairy milk or water—just adjust the seasoning to your own liking.”

    Ingredients:
    1 large celery root
    5 to 6 garlic cloves, peeled and whole
    2 Kaffir lime leaves
    1 bay leaf
    Almond milk
    Salt
    Pepper
    Extra-virgin olive oil

    Instructions:
    1. Clean the celery root by slicing off the exterior skin, then cut it into large cubes.

    2. Place the cubed celery root and garlic in a medium-size pot and add almond milk to cover.

    3. Add the Kaffir lime and bay leaves and a couple of generous pinches of salt and pepper, then bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat.

    4. Once it’s boiling, turn the heat down to medium and simmer for about 15 to 20 minutes, until fork-tender.

    5. Strain over a bowl, keep the cooking liquid, and discard the leaves.

    6. Puree the mixture in a Vitamix or other high-power blender, adding more almond milk as needed. The less milk you use, the thicker the soup or puree.

    7. Add salt and pepper to taste. For a richer soup, add a tablespoon or two of olive oil and blend again.

    Recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.4/10 (306 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +4 (from 106 votes)
    As the brisk winds of fall ease into winter, we begin to crave warmth—and one tasty solution comes in the form of a hot, hearty soup. It can be tough, however, to strike the right balance between richness and nourishment, which is why we turned to Lauren Gerrie, cofounder of... 
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  • Recipe: Rustic tomato soup with olive oil & bread

    This deep-flavored soup originates from Andalucía in southern Spain and is served cold, spiked with cumin and sherry vinegar.

    Ingredients
    1 tsp cumin seeds
    200g sourdough bread, crusts removed, torn into chunks
    1kg very ripe tomatoes
    2 fat garlic cloves
    2 flame-roasted red peppers, peeled and deseeded (from a jar is fine)
    1 tbsp sherry vinegar

    To serve
    2 hard-boiled eggs, peeled
    4 slices serrano ham
    small handful parsley
    drizzle of extra virgin olive oil

    Method
    1.Put a small frying pan on a low heat, add the cumin seeds and toast for 1-2 mins, stirring frequently. Crush the seeds using a pestle and mortar. Soak the bread in cold water for 10 mins.

    2.Meanwhile, to skin the tomatoes, cut a cross in the skin on the top and bottom of each tomato, then put them in a bowl and cover with boiling water. After 1-2 mins, drain the tomatoes and plunge into a bowl of ice-cold water. The skins should now peel off easily.
    3.Cut the flesh into quarters and remove the seeds and pulp. Put the seeds and pulp in a sieve over a bowl and squish to release all the juices from around the seeds. Keep the juice and discard the seeds and pulp.

    4.Put the garlic, tomato quarters and juice, peppers and cumin in the bowl of a food processor or blender. Squeeze out the water from the bread, then add to the processor. Season and blitz until very smooth. Add the vinegar to taste, checking for a good balance of flavours, then cover and chill for at least 2 hrs.

    5.When ready to serve, roughly chop the eggs, serrano ham and parsley. Ladle the soup into bowls and add some of each of the toppings. Add a drizzle of your best olive oil, a grinding of pepper and serve.

    Recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.3/10 (354 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -9 (from 113 votes)
    This deep-flavored soup originates from Andalucía in southern Spain and is served cold, spiked with cumin and sherry vinegar. Ingredients 1 tsp cumin seeds 200g sourdough bread, crusts removed, torn into chunks 1kg very ripe tomatoes 2 fat garlic cloves 2 flame-roasted red peppers,... 
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  • Recipe: Tomato Basil Bisque with Pesto and Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Serves 2 as main course or 4 as first course
    1 hour cooking time with 10 minute active cooking, can be made ahead

    This is a light spin on a classic creamy soup without the cream. This Tomato Basil Bisque is the perfect dish for drizzling with pesto and served with a piece of crusty pesto-topped bread.

    INGREDIENDS
    8 medium size tomatoes on the vine (about 1 1/2 pound)
    1/2 cup of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, divided
    kosher salt and pepper to taste
    4 inch chunk of day old baguette
    1 garlic clove
    5 large basil leaves Pesto, for garnish

    DIRECTIONS
    Preheat oven to 400º. Place tomatoes in roasting pan and drizzle with 1/4 cup of We Olive Basil Olive Oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast for 40 minutes. Cover baguette with water in a bowl let sit for 5 minutes. Remove bread from water and add to a blender with remaining 1/4 cup of We Olive Basil Olive Oil and garlic clove. Blend until mixture becomes a paste. Add basil leaves and tomatoes with juices into blender and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Divide among bowls and garnish with pesto.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.1/10 (119 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +6 (from 30 votes)
    Serves 2 as main course or 4 as first course 1 hour cooking time with 10 minute active cooking, can be made ahead This is a light spin on a classic creamy soup without the cream. This Tomato Basil Bisque is the perfect dish for drizzling with pesto and served with a piece of... 
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  • Recipe and its origin: Ratatouille with Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Succinctly defined, Ratatouille is a traditional French Provencal vegetable stew.
    But that simplifies this delicious dish, which has a complicated history, carries much debate on its best preparation, and, for many, is most closely associated with the 2007 Disney animated movie which bears its name.

    Ratatouille is all of these things, but, most important, this dish is a crowning glory to several of nature’s tastiest vegetables.

    Let’s start with the name, which is an expressive derivation of the French verb “touiller,” meaning “to stir up.” And Ratatouille is indeed a flavorful stirring up of its primary and standard ingredients: tomatoes, onion, bell pepper, zucchini, eggplant, squash, garlic and a smattering of assorted herbs and spices.

    RATATOUILLE

    (The ingredients should be cooked in batches, then combined)

    ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 medium-size eggplant, peeled and cut into ½-inch pieces
    1/3 clove garlic, minced
    A pinch of salt and a grind of pepper
    * * * *
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2 yellow squash, cut into ½-inch pieces
    2 zucchini, cut into ½-inch pieces
    1/3 clove garlic, minced
    A pinch of salt and a grind of pepper
    * * * *
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    1 large onion, cut into ½-inch pieces
    1 bell pepper, cored, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    1/3 clove garlic, minced
    A pinch of sale and a grind of pepper
    * * * *
    5 tomatoes, finely chopped
    1 cup of fresh basil leaves, shredded and loosely packed
    1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

    DIRECTIONS

    Heat the ¼ cup of olive oil, add the eggplant, and cook, stirring over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes.
    Add the garlic, salt and pepper and cook for another minute
    Spoon the eggplant onto a plate and set aside
    Put 2 tablespoons olive oil into the same pot, add the squash and zucchini, and cook over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes.
    Add the garlic, salt and pepper and cook for another minute.
    Spoon the squash and zucchini onto a plate and keep aside.
    Put 2 tablespoons olive oil into the same pot. Add the onion and bell pepper and cook until softened, about 7-8 minutes.
    Add the remaining garlic, salt and pepper and cook for another minute.
    Add the chopped tomatoes, the reserved, already-cooked vegetables, and the shredded basil.
    Cook about 15 minutes or until the tomatoes have broken down and the vegetables are tender. Stir in the zest and lemon juice.
    If desired, sprinkle a little crumbled goat cheese on top of each serving.

    Ratatouille origin is debatable.

    I tend to look at Ratatouille as a dish with three probable lives. The first is pre-historic, going back to the discovery of fire and the creation of the first liquid-proof vessel. These combined enabled man to cook the first stew, whatever its ingredients might have been at that time.

    We know from culinary history that it didn’t include tomatoes or zucchini, which had yet to find their way into Europe from the Americas. And eggplant, back then, was exclusive to India.

    Nonetheless, there was some sort of stew, and that was a start.

    Next, its second life brought forth Ratatouille as we know it today, created from a proliferation of seasonal vegetables in the Mediterranean. The French claim the full, official name is Ratatouille Nicoise, reflecting a wide belief that the dish originated in Nice in the South of France.

    Curiously, though generally considered a signature Provencal dish, Nice is not geographically in Provence, a little detail that residents elect to overlook. Others claim that Ratatouille might well have come from adjacent parts of Italy and Spain, and, from there, crept into France.

    Finally, and less seriously, Ratatouille gained recognition and some popularity as a result of the animated Disney movie of the same name, which debuted in 2007 and won an Oscar the following year. Though this introduced Ratatouille to the less-food-conscious, it’s odd that the recipe and end-product featured in the film, and created by renowned consulting chef Thomas Keller, was far more elaborate, refined and time-consuming than the peasant-based real thing,

    Nonetheless, the movie served to promote this deserving dish.

    Beyond its history, there is endless debate on how to make a traditional Ratatouille. There are three schools of thought on the subject. One, saute all the vegetables together. Two, layer then bake them like a casserole (Julia Child’s preference). And three, saute each ingredient separately, then combine and simmer them together.

    As the accompanying recipe shows, I prefer the latter. I find a comforting vote of confidence in this technique from noted chef Joel Robouchon who wrote in his cookbook, “The secret of a good Ratatouille is to cook the vegetables separately so each will taste truly of itself.” In other words, you will savor individual flavors and still enjoy the complexity of their combination.

    Usually, Ratatouille is served as a side dish, but topping pasta with it makes a good, hearty meal. Also, a generous serving, either hot or cold, makes a nice lunch, accompanied with good French bread and perhaps a small green salad. For some added zip, you could sprinkle the top of each serving with crumbled goat cheese. But, however you serve it, I can think of no better way to enjoy vegetables.

    Source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.3/10 (103 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +4 (from 28 votes)
    Succinctly defined, Ratatouille is a traditional French Provencal vegetable stew. But that simplifies this delicious dish, which has a complicated history, carries much debate on its best preparation, and, for many, is most closely associated with the 2007 Disney animated movie... 
    Read More →
  • Trahanas soup with extra virgin olive oil

    Ingredients

    260gr. Trahanas by Vaoni (sweet)
    1/4 teacup of Vaoni olive oil
    1 dried onion
    2 spring onions
    2 leeks (only the white part of the leek)
    1/2 teacup of red dry wine
    1 cube vegetable broth (in 0.5 lit)
    2 tablespoons of tomato paste
    1 teaspoon dried mint
    1 pinch of salt
    pepper
    paprika (sweet)
    feta cheese or gouda cheese

    In a casserole-type pan warm VAONI extra virgin olive oil and saute very gently the finely chopped dried onion, spring onions and the leeks for ten
    minutes over a very low heat until they get a light color. Then pour wine and wait for the alcohol to evaporate, after that, pour the vegetable broth and add the paste tomato, salt, pepper, dried mint and about 1,7 – 1,8 lit of hot water.
    Reduce the heat and allow the contents of the pot to boil for 10 minutes and stir. Then, add Trahana by Vaoni and boil for 5-10 minutes, depending how you want trahana. Let simmer and stir until soup thickens.

    Serve the soup hot with grated feta cheese and paprika on top.

    Remember to stir often and if necessary add more hot water little by little. If you don’t have feta cheese, another good option is gouda cheese.

    Recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.8/10 (90 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +9 (from 31 votes)
    Ingredients 260gr. Trahanas by Vaoni (sweet) 1/4 teacup of Vaoni olive oil 1 dried onion 2 spring onions 2 leeks (only the white part of the leek) 1/2 teacup of red dry wine 1 cube vegetable broth (in 0.5 lit) 2 tablespoons of tomato paste 1 teaspoon dried mint 1 pinch of salt pepper paprika... 
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  • Recipe: Carrot and Cashew Soup with Olive Oil

    Ingredients

    1 pound (about 6 to 8) carrots, cut into ½ inch rounds
    2 medium yellow or white onions, diced
    1 celery rib, diced
    2 garlic cloves, quartered
    4 cups vegetable broth or water
    ½ cup cashews, soaked for 1 to 4 hours to soften
    Salt to taste

    For the Parsley Oil

    1 handful fresh flat-leaf parsley with stems, coarsely chopped (about ½ cup)
    1 clove garlic
    ½ cup extra virgin olive oil preferably Vaoni
    Salt to taste

    Directions

    To make the soup, in a medium pot, combine the carrots, celery, onion, and garlic and cover with the broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer, uncovered, for about 35 to 40 minutes, or until the carrots fork-tender. Add the cashews and stir. Simmer for an additional 5 minutes.
    Meanwhile, make the Parsley Oil. Combine the parsley, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and salt in the bowl of a small food processor and process until smooth.
    Transfer the soup to a blender and puree until smooth. Season with salt. Add water to thin out if the soup seems too thick. Pour the soup into individual bowls and drizzle with generous amounts of Parsley Oil.

    recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.5/10 (143 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +7 (from 47 votes)
    Ingredients 1 pound (about 6 to 8) carrots, cut into ½ inch rounds 2 medium yellow or white onions, diced 1 celery rib, diced 2 garlic cloves, quartered 4 cups vegetable broth or water ½ cup cashews, soaked for 1 to 4 hours to soften Salt to taste For the Parsley Oil 1 handful... 
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