• Tax Reduction In Italy will help Olive Growers

    The latest decision of changing and reducing the IMU (the municipal tax for the real property) which was approved with much trouble and effort by the Italian Government in the last few days, will probably have positive consequences on the next olive harvest, since the tax on real estate has been completely cancelled for agricultural properties…

    According Unaprol’s program surveys about last year’s olive oil consumption in Italy, where more than 217 millions liters were sold in 2012, for a value of 850 millions euros.

    Extra virgin olive oil accounted for 72 percent of the sales, while the olive oil grade accounted for 13 percent.

    The “100% Italian”-labelled extra virgin olive oil accounted for 12 percent of sales.

    Organic and PDO extra virgin olive oils performed modestly, slipping from 2011 levels both in value and volume.

    Using the QR code, the program tracks over 600 growing groups including about 7,000 olive farms all over Italy whose production line is completely traced.

    Reed more at oliveoiltimes

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    The latest decision of changing and reducing the IMU (the municipal tax for the real property) which was approved with much trouble and effort by the Italian Government in the last few days, will probably have positive consequences on the next olive harvest, since the tax on... 
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  • Turkish olive oil exports boom amid Spain drought

    Turkey raised its olive and olive oil exports by 172 percent in the first eight months of the year thanks to drought in Spain, an agriculture sector representative has said. But he also warned that Turkey needed to create brands if it wanted to maintain this success.

    “Our olive oil sector, which has entered new markets and raised its exports by two-digit percentages to several countries, because of the drought in Spain should seek ways to remain permanent in these markets,” Turkish Agricultural Chambers Union (TZOB) President Şemsi Bayraktar said.

    Turkey, the fourth largest olive oil producer, jumped its exports to $333 million from $122.2 million with the 172 percent rise between January and August, according to data announced by the Turkish Exporters’ Association (TİM).

    The olive oil season began on Nov. 1, 2012, and Bayraktar said the nine-month results supported the prediction that the exports would surpass $400 million by Oct. 31, 2013, when the season ends. Spain’s olive oil production in was adversely affected by the country’s struggle with poor crop yields, which dropped to around one-third, paving the way for Turkish exporters to multiply their sales to countries such as Italy, Austria, the U.S. and New Zealand.

    However, Bayraktar said only 30 percent of Turkish olive oils were branded which hampered the popularity and credibility of the Turkish goods in these new markets. “We still sell 70 percent of our products without brands. We have to constantly provide goods in newly entered markets. We could face the same thing that Spain is experiencing today. But countries like Spain and Italy can buy our unbranded olive oil, case it and sell like it’s their own product,” he said. The union head also noted that the sector was still facing problems in boosting domestic demand and competing with the European rivals, which are benefiting from the union’s incentives.

    source hurriyetdailynews

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    Turkey raised its olive and olive oil exports by 172 percent in the first eight months of the year thanks to drought in Spain, an agriculture sector representative has said. But he also warned that Turkey needed to create brands if it wanted to maintain this success. “Our olive... 
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  • The olive oil production in Greece will fall

    As is usually the most important indicator of a very difficult situation comes from Crete, traditionally reservoir oils of high quality.

    The first signs on the next oil production are not encouraging.

    As is usually the most important indicator of a very difficult situation comes from Crete, traditionally reservoir oils of high quality.

    Hellenic island produces about one-third of national output this year but production capacity looks set to plummet: -60%.

    In Crete, as reported by the governor of the region, Stavros Arnaoutakis, production should not exceed 50-60 thousand tons, compared with an average of 120 thousand.

    Blame the weather, a particularly warm and dry spring, but that will lead to a loss of income for the local growers, about 150 million euro.

    The collapse of production could affect the social estate, as reported by the governor, who said: “the problem needs to be addressed as quickly as possible, so that oil producers are compensated. We are faced with an explosive situation”

    Teatro Naturale International

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    As is usually the most important indicator of a very difficult situation comes from Crete, traditionally reservoir oils of high quality. The first signs on the next oil production are not encouraging. As is usually the most important indicator of a very difficult situation comes... 
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  • Uruguay becomes the latest Olive Oil producer country to join the IOC

    The International Olive Council is delighted to announce the entry of a new Member of the Organisation.

    After obtaining first-hand experience of the workings of the Council by attending a number of sessions as an observer, the Government of Uruguay filed its instrument of accession to the International Agreement on Olive Oil and Table Olives, 2005, on 30 July 2013. The accession was officially notified on 20 August by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of Spain, which is the depositary of the Agreement.

    Uruguay is the second South American country to join after Argentina did so in 2009. It is the latest addition to the IOC community, which hopes to see other olive producing nations follow soon in its tracks.

    Although a small olive growing nation, Uruguay will bring fresh perspective to the Organisation. Welcome on board!

    Sourrce International Olive Council

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    The International Olive Council is delighted to announce the entry of a new Member of the Organisation. After obtaining first-hand experience of the workings of the Council by attending a number of sessions as an observer, the Government of Uruguay filed its instrument of accession... 
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  • After a Recession in Portugal, the Tiny Green Fruits of Success

    Portugal is finding that increasing exports is the way to pull its economy out of a recession.

    For 127 years, Herdade de Manantiz has been producing olive oil, mostly for the domestic market. But having suffered through recession like thousands of other traditional businesses, it has started overhauling its operations and searching for customers outside Portugal.

    Previously, Manantiz had relied on rare rainfall to water its 30,000 olive trees, planted across 529 acres of parched land in one of southern Europe’s driest regions.

    In February, Manantiz installed its first irrigation system, an investment of 197,000 euros, or $263,000, that is meant to help quadruple production. In May, the company completed its first overseas sale — to a Brazilian retailer that bought 504 bottles of oil. It is pursuing buyers in Sweden and Japan for its oil made from galega olives, which are unique to Portugal.

    Over all, after falling about 9 percent in 2008 at the onset of the financial crisis, Portugal’s olive oil exports have more than doubled since, according to data from Casa do Azeite, an industry body. Last year alone, olive oil exports rose 20 percent.

    Mariana Matos, secretary general of Casa do Azeite, estimated that Portugal had added about 20,000 hectares of olive trees over the past five years, in part because of investors from countries like Spain, Italy and Switzerland.

    Manuel Costa Reis, an economist at Present Value Consulting in Lisbon, which advises Portuguese banks and other corporations on asset valuations, said that Portugal’s export competitiveness was “without a doubt a very surprising and positive outcome of this crisis.”
    “Portugal had been one of the losers in the globalization process because most of our industries were competing directly with the emerging markets,” he said.

    He said that the economic crisis had forced companies to start producing higher-quality products that can be marketed at a higher price. Manantiz is a good example of that. Its initial shipment of olive oil to Brazil sold at 60 reais, or nearly $26, a bottle, four times what is sells for in Portugal.

    Portuguese exports rose 6.2 percent in the second quarter from the comparable period in 2012, according to data this month from Portugal’s national statistics institute.

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    Portugal is finding that increasing exports is the way to pull its economy out of a recession. For 127 years, Herdade de Manantiz has been producing olive oil, mostly for the domestic market. But having suffered through recession like thousands of other traditional businesses,... 
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  • Israeli Olive Oil Comes of Age

    The modern olive-oil industry in Israel is fairly young, but producers are seeing brilliant results and rising recognition

    As more people around the world reach for a bottle of extra-virgin olive oil for dressing salads, frying, baking and even drinking, a revived ancient industry in Israel is getting attention in global markets and competitions.

    Interest in Israeli olive oil mirrors the burgeoning Israeli wine scene, but it’s a newer phenomenon, says Hilla Wenkert, an international olive-oil judge and owner of Olia, a concept store in Tel Aviv stocked with oils made of Leccino, Coratina, Koroneiki, Souri and other varieties grown in Israel.

    “People started to be more aware of their well-being and the health benefits of olive oil. It started as a trend, and now it’s part of daily life,” Wenkert tells ISRAEL21c.

    In the past few years, Israeli land devoted to modern olive groves has increased to some 330,000 dunams (81,000 acres) from a mere 2,000 dunams. Every year, between 15,000 and 16,000 tons of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) is produced. Only about 1,000 tons get exported – a tiny stream compared to Spanish and Italian oil.

    However, at the recent Summer Fancy Food Show in New York, distributors showed much interest in Israeli olive oil, says Wenkert.

    “The world is full of Italian, Spanish, Greek, Turkish, Moroccan and Tunisian olive oil, but most of it is lower quality because many people cannot afford the good stuff,” she says.

    Israeli EVOO rates as the “good stuff” for which discriminating consumers are willing to pay more. Israel’s growers and oil producers work with agricultural researchers on methods to yield premium unrefined extra virgin. “Virgin” means it comes from the first pressing, while “extra” signifies low acidity, both critical factors in a high-quality oil.

    “Virgin oil is a fresh fruit juice, while refined is an industrial product,” says Zohar Kerem, a food chemist specializing in olives at the Hebrew University’s Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition. Though refined oil is cheaper, flavor and health benefits are lost in the process, he tells ISRAEL21c.

    From the tree to the stone’

    Argentinean émigré Moshe Spak decided it’s high time Israeli olive oil got its due.

    “Everyone knows about Israeli expertise in other areas, but not about olive-oil quality,” says Spak, founder and director of the Terra Olivo Mediterranean International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition in Israel, founded four years ago.

    The 2013 contest, judged by an international panel of 25 expert tasters, drew 489 entries from 21 countries. The overall Israeli champion was a Picholine variety from Meshek Achiya.

    Several factors account for the exceptional profile of Israeli olive oil, Kerem explains.

    First, most Israeli olives are irrigated with salty (brackish) and purified wastewater. This adds natural fertilizers to the soil and does not compromise the fruit’s quality.

    Second, harvesting is completed within the ideal window of October to December. In many other countries, the process goes on through March, when olives are past their prime.

    Israeli growers do not store the fruit for long before extracting the oil, abiding by an old Arab aphorism in the industry: “From the tree to the stone.”

    “That means when you want to make good olive oil, the sooner you get the detached olives to the mill the better the oil you will get,” says Kerem.

    Finally, whereas in most other olive-oil-producing countries only regional native strains are grown, Israel’s farmers learned how to make cultivars from other Mediterranean countries flourish here. Differences between varieties can be vast.

    “If you want to be a gourmet, you have one olive oil for salad, one for baking, one for frying and one for cooking,” Kerem says. Scientists from the Ministry of Agriculture’s Volcani Center work on issues such as optimizing the date of harvest to get the specific properties that Kerem’s team is seeking.

    Boutique olive farms

    Both wine and olive oil were produced in the Middle East thousands of years ago and continued on a small scale to the present day. Israelis have propelled these industries into the modern age with cutting-edge research and technology.

    Reuven Birger, the Israel Ministry of Agriculture’s chief specialist for olives and almonds, tells ISRAEL21c that the invention of drip irrigation enabled Israeli farmers to begin planting dense olive groves in the early 1990s. These groves now account for at least 10,000 tons of Israel’s annual supply of olive oil.

    “If we depend on rain, each tree needs a lot of area to thrive. More densely planted trees have greater yields,” Birger says.

    It takes approximately 1,000 olives to make a liter of oil.

    Birger says Israel has several large producers, about 150 boutique producers and at least 100 small farms that sell their olives directly to producer-retailers such as Olia and Pereg. Some of the boutique oils have been picking up prestigious medals at Terra Olivo and at international competitions in Japan and Argentina.

    “We have our own specific taste in Israel,” says Wenkert, who likes experimenting with blends. “Compared to, let’s say, Greek or Italian oils that are smooth and fruity and quite aromatic, ours are more pungent and a little more aggressive. I think it’s because of the water, the soil and the specific climate here.”

    During harvest time, Wenkert travels around looking for new varieties. Olia’s “library” includes a new mild organic oil for babies and toddlers, as well as a line produced from olives grown by Israeli singing star Yuval Banai, who several years ago began his own farm in the countryside.

    Like Banai, Israeli city-dwellers sometimes move north or south to try their hand at agriculture, says Wenkert. Olives are a good choice for first-time farmers because professional expertise is readily available to them.

    “People here really have something emotional toward olive trees,” Wenkert observes. “It’s part of their tradition. Even on Tel Aviv roofs, the most popular tree is the olive tree. It’s very symbolic and beautiful.”

    Inside Olia concept store in Tel Aviv. Photo by Abigail Klein Leichman

    Article source Israeli voice

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    The modern olive-oil industry in Israel is fairly young, but producers are seeing brilliant results and rising recognition As more people around the world reach for a bottle of extra-virgin olive oil for dressing salads, frying, baking and even drinking, a revived ancient industry... 
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  • The EU-funded project EUROLIVE

    Olive oil is good for you – in more ways than one
    [Date: 2013-08-27]
    Olive oil is a key component of the Mediterranean diet and is considered by many to be a natural health-food product. Until recently, the known protective effects of olive oil against oxidative stress-associated diseases, such as cardiovascular, cancer, or neurodegenerative diseases, had been attributed to its high monounsaturated fat content.

    The EU-funded project EUROLIVE (‘The effect of olive oil consumption on oxidative damage in European populations’) investigated whether there might be other chemical factors contributing to the documented beneficial health effects of olive oil.

    In particular, project partners, led by researchers at the Mar Institute of Medical Research in Barcelona, wanted to know if olive oil rich in phenolic compounds, such as virgin olive oil, would have particular health benefits beyond those already established for olive oil in general.

    The researchers did six clinical trials in which 200 healthy volunteers were given 25 millilitres per day of three similar olive oils for three weeks. The olive oils had different polyphenol content. The dose was similar to the amount typically ingested daily in Mediterranean countries.

    The results showed that the higher the polyphenolic content of the olive oil consumed, the higher the increase in HDL cholesterol levels (so-called good cholesterol).

    Positive effects were also recorded for the atherogenic index – the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol, and the oxidative damage of lipids decreased in a linear manner with olive oil polyphenolic content. Lipid oxidation is considered a high risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease.

    Finally, the results of the EUROLIVE project demonstrated that consuming 25 millilitres of olive oil per day, in place of other fats, did not lead to participants gaining weight.

    For many, these results put an end to the debate over the antioxidant properties of olive oil polyphenols when consumed, and confirm the added value of virgin olive oil as opposed to other oils in protecting against cardiovascular disease and other risk factors.

    EUROLIVE received EUR 1.9 million in EU funding. The researchers completed their work in December 2004.

    Source cordis.europa.eu
    For more information, please visit:

    Project factsheet

    Mar Institute of Medical Research

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    Olive oil is good for you – in more ways than one [Date: 2013-08-27] Olive oil is a key component of the Mediterranean diet and is considered by many to be a natural health-food product. Until recently, the known protective effects of olive oil against oxidative stress-associated... 
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  • The cost to produce one kilo of olive oil in Spain reach 2.47 euros

    The Observatory of Prices and Markets of the Commission of Agriculture considers that the average cost to produce one kilogram of olive oil in the dry land olive grove not mecanizable, that represents more than 70 % of the cultivation in Andalusia and in Cordova, amounts to 2,47 euros. This value, which has been fixed by the Meeting of Andalusia after a survey realized to the sector in the campaign 2010/2011, leaves the price in three of the last four campaigns below the threshold of the profitability with clarity. Except in the current harvest, in which this value has excelled itself for the low production that has registered, the production costs have been over the quotation that the olive ones have obtained on the markets. Of the economic(economical) results had not been for the important helps of the Common Agricultural policy (PAC) they had been ruinous in the last agricultural exercises.

    In its study, the Commission of Agriculture distinguishes between three types of olive groves to fix the production costs: dry land olive grove not mecanizable, whose(which) investment to obtain one kilo of oil is located in 2,47 euros; dry land olive grove mecanizable, that goes down in costs to 1,93 euros; and of extensive irrigation, which needs an investment for 1,59 euros.

    In its report, the Board indicates that the main expense in the olive grove of rainfed machineable is labor, which corresponds to the practice of pruning of the olive grove. To get a kilo of oil will require 1.31 euros, which represents 53% of all expenditures. Minors are the chapters on fertilization (0.33 euros), soil management (0.29 ), phytosanitary treatments (0.25 ) and collection and transport (0.27 ). The direct costs amount to 2.44 euros, to what we need to add 0.03 euros in taxes and general expenses. In this latter concept will include repairs to roads or gullies.

    Article source diariocordoba

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    The Observatory of Prices and Markets of the Commission of Agriculture considers that the average cost to produce one kilogram of olive oil in the dry land olive grove not mecanizable, that represents more than 70 % of the cultivation in Andalusia and in Cordova, amounts to 2,47... 
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  • Olive oil producers are concerned about the UK’s traffic-light food labelling system

    Olive oil producers and other European food industry members have said they’re concerned about the UK’s traffic-light food labelling system because their products would be labelled as unhealthy.

    But nutrition labels are seen in some circles as important in providing dietary information to help consumers make informed healthy food choices. Labels may be the only source of nutritional information available to the consumer at the point of purchase, therefore it’s important the information is easy to find, read, interpret and understand.

    More than 130 UK food businesses now display display nutrition information voluntarily. Currently four main formats are used in the UK, and these have many hybrids.

    Over the past decade, many studies investigating consumer understanding of nutrition labelling have been carried out in the UK and the Food Standards Agency (FSA) led a series of studies in 2009-10 with consumers and industry stakeholders to consider the standardisation of labelling on front of packs.

    This led to the key elements considered important by consumers: guideline daily amounts (GDA), traffic light colours, nutritional values as text, standardised portion sizes and values per 100g.

    In June 2010 the European Parliament backed a proposal for more uniform food labelling in the European Union. They rejected the traffic light colour coding system, opting instead for GDAs for front of pack nutrition labelling in line with the majority of current food industry practice in the UK and Europe.

    Now, we finally seem to have got agreement in the UK, and for the first time the major retailers are working with the FSA and Department of Health and have come up with an agreed front of pack labeling system.

    GDAs will be replaced by reference intakes and detailed industry specific guidelines have been prepared, with defined limits of what may be considered a low, medium and high with different cut off points for food and drinks.

    The UK food industry has been preparing for this move for a number of years and has been busy reformulating products so that they are less in the red zone, for example using salt substitutes in foods and the addition of sugar substitutes to fizzy drinks.

    And with the amount of information that supermarkets have on our shopping habits, it can’t be too long before they are using data analytics from labelling information to help steer us in healthier directions.

    But it’s not completely straightforward. For example, olive oil, despite it being widely considered as a healthy choice because it’s high in unsaturated fats, would still be labelled with a red light.

    Other products such as cheese and butter would also come under red. Tthe guidance recognises this and notes that these and other products such as nuts and oily fish will have a red light due to the presence of naturally occurring fats. It is recommended that these products state the amount of saturated fats, to indicate to consumers the balance of fats and also highlight particular benefits of their products in line with EU Health claims.

    Whether we chose to differentiate between different red light foods remains to be seen. We are human after all.

    Article “Some food will always get a red light (but we can still eat it)”source theconversation

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    Olive oil producers and other European food industry members have said they’re concerned about the UK’s traffic-light food labelling system because their products would be labelled as unhealthy. But nutrition labels are seen in some circles as important in providing dietary... 
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  • Argentina: Olive Oil & Olive Cultivation review

    Argentina olive oil production

    Argentina now has more than 100,000 hectares of modern olive groves for oil extraction. They have genetic plantations from the best nurseries in the world, armed cadres monovarietal 250-330 plants / ha and pressurized irrigation. Added to this two major advantages to the counter and the ability to produce increasing volumes of high quality virgin oils that may be classified by variety. The country produces low cost high quality olive oils and is definitely shaping up as one of the next global market leaders.

    For the year 2010, when the entire area planted in late 2000 enter into production, the country could produce between 45,000 and 50,000 tons. olive oil. Moreover, the potential production of Argentina could reach 200,000 tons. olive oil.

    Domestic production has 2 major advantages to the counter and the ability to produce large quantities of virgin oil of excellent quality that will be classified by variety.

    Argentina would become the main oil production center outside the varietal source areas for them. In particular: Arbequina, Coratina, Barnea, Picual and Frantoio.

    The increased production and changing the fate of the oil produced changes in the qualities of the oil produced: there is a clear trend towards the production of fruity extra virgin olive oils and varietals.

    From IOC Newsletter:
    Argentina joined the ranks of the IOC Members three years ago. Since it will be hosting the 18th extraordinary session of the Council in Buenos Aires from 2 to 6 July 2012, this month’s issue of the newsletter focuses on olive growing in this Latin American country.

    Argentina offers excellent natural conditions for the development of olive cultivation. Two yardsticks can be used to measure its potential: the exponential growth in the number of advanced genetics trees and the growth in Argentine exports, particularly to the two key markets of the United States and Brazil. The Argentine olive industry saw a revival in the 1990s when new orchards were established with a range of varieties.

    Olives are cultivated on more than 100 000 ha of land, concentrated in the tree regions-55 000 ha in the North-West region (provinces of Catamarca, La Rioja); over 9 500 ha in the Central region (provinces of Cordoba and Buenos Aires); and 40 000 ha in the Central-West region (provinces of Mendoza and San Juan) with 40 000 ha- which have been joined recently by Neuquen. The bulk of the olive produced in Argentina is extra virgin grade. The industry provides direct employment for more than 15 000 people and an estimated 45 000 indirect jobs.
    argentina_oliveoil_export

    Graph I shows how production, consumption, imports and exports have evolved over the last 20 years. Olive oil production has risen sharply in the last ten seasons (2000/01-2010/11)* albeit more in relative terms than absolute terms (+275%=+11 000 t). However, in the last four crop years it has not managed to top the level recorded in 2007/08 (27 000 t). Exports have shot up by 175% in the last decade. The main destinations are the United States (50% of all Argentine exports), followed by Brazil (40%) and Uruguay and Chile. Eighty percent of exports are of bulk product while the remaining 20% is packed. Consumption has dropped by 17% over the last 10 crop years. This decrease expands to 39% when the averages for the last two decades are compared.

    Table olive production has also experienced constant growth, rising from 30 000 t in 2000/01 to 250 000 t in 2010/11. According to industry sources, this increase can be attributed to the entry into crop production of new orchards established in the 1990s. Brazil is the top destination, followed by the United States. Others noteworthy destinations for Argentine table olive exports are Venezuela, Canada, Uruguay and Chile. Table olive consumption has soared by 180% in the last 10 years, rising from 12 500 t in 2000/01 to 35 000 t in 2010/11, moving in the opposite direction to olive oil consumption.

    Scrutiny of the developments in the both branches of the industry reveals that the downturn in olive oil production as of 2008/09 can very probably be explained in part by orchard conversion to production for table olives.

    source International Olive Council

     

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    Argentina olive oil production Argentina now has more than 100,000 hectares of modern olive groves for oil extraction. They have genetic plantations from the best nurseries in the world, armed cadres monovarietal 250-330 plants / ha and pressurized irrigation. Added to this two... 
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  • Olive Oil Market Report 2013

    At the biginning of the 2013 the stocks in Spain added up to ca. 755,000 tons. The prices had developed down in the previous months as the consumption in March was just to 68,000 tons (March 2012: 110,000 tons). In April, the consumption increased to 82,000 tons. And in the coming months are amounts expected of about 90,000 – 100,000 tons, especially as the stocks in Greece, Tunisia, Morocco will run out and the Italian consumers have started to buy in Spain again. This has resulted in the price trend, which has reversed.

    Currently, it is still a bit early to estimate precisely the coming harvest above all because of increased rainfall and an unusually cold spring. Due to this situation a late harvest is to be expected. For Spain is an oil production about 1,300,000 tons for the harvest 2013/2014 estimated. Certainly, it is believed that the other olive oil producing countries are going to crop up to 30 % less. This is attributable to the strong Scirocco Winds, which has a large part of the Cretan blooming affected.

    We assume that the price level will remain constant until the recent harvest in November. The qualities are rather mixed, hence it is expected to have surcharge for good sensory commodities surcharge for good sensory commodities.

    source hees.de

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    At the biginning of the 2013 the stocks in Spain added up to ca. 755,000 tons. The prices had developed down in the previous months as the consumption in March was just to 68,000 tons (March 2012: 110,000 tons). In April, the consumption increased to 82,000 tons. And in the... 
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  • Israel's olive growers urge Agriculture Ministry to delay imports from Jordan

    Local growers fear olive imports will cause excess in the market and as a result the local crops may not be fully used.

    As the harvest season approaches, Israel’s olive farmers are asking the Agriculture Ministry to delay plans to import olives from Jordan.

    There will likely be excess demand for olives this year, beyond what Israel grows itself, so industrial olive growers aren’t opposed to the planned imports per se, said Zvi Alon, head of the Plants Production and Marketing Board. The question is when.

    Manufacturers of preserved olives want imports to start in September, to minimize the chance of running out of raw olives. But the farmers fear that instead of a lack, this may cause an excess of olives in Israel’s market, and as a result the local crops may not be fully used. They want the import postponed until October.

    The Agriculture Ministry recently estimated that this year’s olive crop will come in 6,000 to 9,000 tons short of demand. Israel’s olive industry uses 17,000 tons of olives.

    Alon called for allowing olive imports in September only if it turns out that Israel’s crop is not meeting the industry’s needs.

    Israel has a trade agreement with Jordan that allows for importing fruits and vegetables duty-free based on Israel’s market needs. The Agriculture Ministry decides when certain produce items are lacking, and decides on imports in order to keep local prices stable.

    The Agriculture Ministry stated in response that it takes growers, industry and consumers into account, noting that this year’s harvest was likely to be smaller than last year’s.

    Article source haaretz

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    Local growers fear olive imports will cause excess in the market and as a result the local crops may not be fully used. As the harvest season approaches, Israel’s olive farmers are asking the Agriculture Ministry to delay plans to import olives from Jordan. There will likely... 
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  • Greek Olive Oil Exports Trapped in Vietnam

    According to a document that was sent by the Greek Embassy in Hanoi, Vietnam, to the Hellenic Ministries of Foreign Affairs and of Rural Development and Food, with the subject Blocking of Greek olive oil import in Vietnam, Messenian-Greek exports of olive oil and olives to Vietnam are blocked, as the Messenian products are in the customs office in Hanoi at Hai Phong Harbor. MP of Heraklion, Lefteris Avgenakis, said in Parliament that, “The Vietnamese authorities are putting obstacles citing new circulars in order to allow import of food of plant and animal origin.”

    “According to relevant publications, it has been reported that the embassy’s document conceals the fact that they have been informed of the Vietnamese decision, which requires updating of the Greek legislation concerning pesticides, since March,” the MP said.

    Avgenakis pointed out, “This situation affects Greek exporters, while there is a risk of losing a new market, which was opened painstakingly by private initiative. In contrast, competitor countries on olive oil’s export immediately responded to the Vietnamese’s request gaining the market.”

    The MP of Heraklion stressed that the market in question will be lost, while the exporter, who is waiting to be paid by the Vietnamese with receipt of the cargo which still remains in the harbor’s warehouses, will be financially destroyed. Avgenakis requests that the blocking of exports of Messenian olive oil, as well as of all food originating from plant and animals exported to Vietnam, at the customs office in Vietnam stops, and asks who is responsible for this delay which has resulted in the products being held at the customs office in Vietnam.

    Souece  greekreporter

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    According to a document that was sent by the Greek Embassy in Hanoi, Vietnam, to the Hellenic Ministries of Foreign Affairs and of Rural Development and Food, with the subject Blocking of Greek olive oil import in Vietnam, Messenian-Greek exports of olive oil and olives to Vietnam... 
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  • Business owners attend Olive Oil Summit

    AUBURN — Terry and Lori Berndt, owners of The Olive Twist Inc., attended the second annual International Olive Oil Summit July 27-28 in Oakland, Calif.

    The educational summit featured speeches and seminars by olive oil experts from around the world and was attended by hundreds of olive oil retailers.

    On the first day of the summit, the Berndts had lunch with journalist Tom Mueller, author of the book, “Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil,” and shared in the day’s full slate of activities. On the second day, they attended an olive oil sensory-tasting school taught by representatives of the Organizzazione Nazionale Assaggiiatori Olio di Oliva, one of the most-respected olive oil schools in the world. The ONAOO assisted the Berndts with the steps for properly tasting and grading olive oil and provided instructions on how to distinguish a quality olive oil and separate out one that is rancid, musty, muddy, or in any other way defective.

    “Most people think rancid oil is what good olive oil is supposed to taste like. But it is the mission of The Olive Twist to educate and share quality olive oil with our friends, family and customers,” said Lori Berndt. “Rancid or bad olive oil in our diets is playing a large role in some of today’s health issues. Conversely, there are many health benefits from using quality extra-virgin olive oil in our diets.”

    Berndt said EVOO should be used within one year of its crush date—because as a fruit juice, olive oil can quickly become rancid, especially if it is not stored properly. To maintain its healthy attributes and prevent rancidity, Berndt recommends storing olive oil out of sunlight, away from heat and sealed with a cork. Detailed storage instructions are available at both retail locations of The Olive Twist, at 6410 W. Jefferson Blvd., Suite 7A, Fort Wayne, and 115 N. Main St., Auburn.

    To educate local consumers on the benefits and uses of extra-virgin olive oil, The Olive Twist soon will be scheduling more of its in-house Olive Oil 101 classes, Berndt said. In addition, she will be teaching Olive Oil 101 on Nov. 5 in partnership with the Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Division of Continuing Studies.

    Berndt is a client of the Northeast Indiana Small Business Development Center, which assisted her in starting her new business in 2010.

    source kpcnews

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    AUBURN — Terry and Lori Berndt, owners of The Olive Twist Inc., attended the second annual International Olive Oil Summit July 27-28 in Oakland, Calif. The educational summit featured speeches and seminars by olive oil experts from around the world and was attended by hundreds... 
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  • Syria's olive and olive oil production expected this season

    Director of the Agriculture Directorate in Lattakia, Munzir Kheir Beik, estimated the olive production expected this season in the province at 63,000 tons, including 15,000 tons for olive oil extraction.

    Kheir Beik noted in a statement to SANA that the olive production of last season was 170,000 tons of olives, 40,000 tons of which were for olive oil extraction.

    He indicated that the Lattakia production of olives makes 17 % of Syria’s production,n with the number of olive trees in Lattakia covering 9 % of the total number of olive trees planted across the country, according to statistics made in 2011.

    He put the exact number of olive trees planted in Lattakia at 10,665 covering an area of 49,504 hectares.

    Olive oil prices rose dramatically recently as they amounted to SYP 10-15 per 20 liter, compared to SYP 2500-3500 last year.

    Head of Secretariat at the Agriculture Directorate, Zuhir Akkari, attributed the rise in oil price to the fact that some dealers have been buying oil from citizens in order to either export it or store it and then sell it at higher prices.

    He also added that the oil stored in Aleppo and Idleb provinces has been smuggled to Turkey, which led to a high export rate of the oil amounts in the coastal and other provinces.

    Article source syriaonline

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    Director of the Agriculture Directorate in Lattakia, Munzir Kheir Beik, estimated the olive production expected this season in the province at 63,000 tons, including 15,000 tons for olive oil extraction. Kheir Beik noted in a statement to SANA that the olive production of last... 
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  • Olive oil market in Australia: A guide to the 2013 vintage

    The new-season press of Australian olives has finished, and it is quite a vintage. Here is a crop of the best.

    Not all olive oils are created equal. Not even all extra virgin olive oils are created equal. True, a drizzle of the golden liquid will spruce up a tangled bowl of spaghetti, but there’s more to a bottle emblazoned with ”premium”, ”extra virgin” and ”cold-pressed” than meets the eye.

    Now is a great time to buy the 2013 vintage of Australian extra virgin olive oil, which is usually made with unrefined pressed olives without using heat or chemicals. To find the best companions for chunks of sourdough and steaming bowls of pasta, we’ve scoured the top shelves for the best of the new season.

    We went for Australian oils only, looking for recently pressed harvests. We assessed bitterness and pungency and compared fruitiness and acidity.

    Green olives, which are not ripe, make better oil. Olives turn purple and then black as they age on the tree, so the best producers pick them green. When olives are picked green, they are usually bitter and pungent, and that’s a good thing for oil. In Australia, green olives are usually shaken from their trees between March and June, making extra virgin oil from the 2013 harvest the freshest right now.

    Unlike wine, olive oil does not improve with age and deteriorates quickly when exposed to sunlight, heat and oxygen. Newly pressed olive oil leaves the palate clean and tastes fresh and the best oil tastes peppery. Sipped neat, which is how we tested it, it can pack a powerful flavour. It’s best consumed within three months after opening, and it’s wise to check the harvest or use-by date on the bottle. Even the best olive oil should be kept no longer than two years.

    Those cooks who swear off extra virgin oil for its inability to be heated to high temperatures can rest easy. Fresh extra virgin oil has a lower acidity than other olive oils, giving it a higher smoke point. This makes extra virgin good for cooking up to about 230 degrees. However, if it’s not fresh, it can burn quickly.

    Australian producers warn consumers to be wary of overseas-made products that get passed off as extra virgin oil. They say imports are sometimes blended with vegetable oil, and artificial colouring is added to make it look fresh. To be sure you get the freshest and best, taste some of this year’s new-season oils and decide for yourself. Here are some the best (listed in order of preference on the day of tasting) to consider:

    Max’s Blend by Camilo

    250ml, $14

    Bitter and pungent, with a complex aroma of green tomato and spicy black pepper. This is one of the most appealing, if intense, new-season olive oils tested. The oil has a clean flavour and the mouth is left feeling fresh. Boutique producer Camilo processes its own olives, and the crops of other growers, in south-western Victoria. The oil is exported; it won a gold medal at Olive Japan and a silver in April at the New York International olive oil competition. The oil has a mild avocado tilt, which is inspiration, perhaps, to drizzle it over the real thing, or a simple spaghetti with shavings of parmesan. Max is the grove’s pet boxer dog.

    camilo.com.au

    Cobram Estate Australian Ultra Premium Hojiblanca Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    500ml, $20

    This premium oil has a creamy palate with an aroma of tropical fruits. It’s smooth, well balanced and lingers in the mouth. It has low levels of bitterness, missing that often-pleasing kick in the throat that some oils have. But it’s a fragrant and complex oil that’s pressed four hours after harvesting. This oil won a best-in-class award in New York. Perfect for dressing a salad or grilled vegetables.

    cobramestate.com.au

    Pukara Estate Premium Australian Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    250ml, $16

    Green bananas and freshly cut grass ooze from this premium and rather delicate oil. Little bitterness and pungency make it a good companion for roast meats and vegetables; it’s not overpowering and enhances flavours.

    pukaraestate.com.au

    The Olive Tree Australian Extra Virgin Olive Oil – Fruity

    500ml, $4.99

    When someone hands you a recipe for an olive oil polenta cake, use this oil to make it. With intense fruit flavour and mild bitterness, the oil can handle almost any companion. With sourdough and dukkah, it would sing. Sold at Aldi stores, this versatile oil is good value for money.

    aldi.com.au

    Cobram Estate Australian Extra Virgin Olive Oil classic flavour intensity

    375ml, $5.50

    Connoisseurs will mull over grassy notes and green bananas when tasting this classic oil. It presents a distinct flavour with moderate bitterness and a creamy aftertaste. It’s a perfect everyday oil to use for grilling meat, roasting vegetables and drizzling over seafood.

    Oasis Olives Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    500ml, $14.50

    A tomato-and-fresh-basil bruschetta, seasoned with sea salt, would be crying out for a drizzle of this oil. Made using a blend of frantoio Tuscan olives, the fruit is grown in southern Australia and harvested early. The oil has a cut-grass and Granny Smith-apple aroma, with a pleasing peppery bite at the back of the throat. There’s a lovely freshness that would do well over a leafy salad or steamed green vegetables.

    oasisolives.com

    Murphy Yetna Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    500ml, $21

    The soft and delicate nature of this oil is due to the conditions in which the producer’s trees are grown: plenty of sun, on river flats of rich red soil, in the mid-west of Western Australia. It has a tropical and floral bouquet, and a mild peppery finish. The producer guarantees the oil is single origin, from this pretty landscape. Oh, to be there, dunking chunks of grilled Italian bread into a saucer of this oil.

    murphyyetna.com.au

    Macaw Creek Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    750ml, $23

    This South Australian producer, with groves just north of Adelaide, does a chemical-free oil with a slightly cloudy consistency in the bottle. The green olives are cold-pressed the same day as the harvest. It has an intense cut-grass scent. The oil has plenty of antioxidants, a peppery kick that hits the back of the throat and a rich finish. Its low acidity makes it good for cooking. It’s ideal doused over a seasoned steak before chargrilling, or drizzled over a thick slice of toasted sourdough.

    macawcreek.com.au

    Gwydir Grove Australian Cold Pressed Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    500ml, $21

    This creamy-flavoured oil has a more rounded slant with less complexity. It’s the oil for those who like less oomph, are concerned about overpowering flavours and prefer only a slight peppery tickle in a premium oil. The grove, based near Moree in northern NSW, makes a low-acidity oil, so it’s great for cooking because it’s less likely to burn at higher temperatures. There’s also a ”Family” label for ”everyday use”.

    gwydirgrove.com.au

    Article source goodfood

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    The new-season press of Australian olives has finished, and it is quite a vintage. Here is a crop of the best. Not all olive oils are created equal. Not even all extra virgin olive oils are created equal. True, a drizzle of the golden liquid will spruce up a tangled bowl of spaghetti,... 
    Read More →
  • Crete governor rings alarm bells over olive oil production

    The regional governor of Crete, Stavros Arnaoutakis, on Wednesday wrote to the leadership of the Agricultural Development Ministry requesting funds to prop up the island’s olive oil producers, who are expected to face a revenue shortfall of 150 million euros this year.

    Weather conditions, and especially a warm and dry spring, have led to poor growth of the island’s olive trees, which are a mainstay of the local economy.

    Arnaoutakis said that olive farmers in Crete are facing a decline in oil production of around 60 percent as this year’s yield is not expected to exceed 40-50 tons of olive oil, compared to the 100-120 tons produced each year on average.

    The loss of revenues, the regional governor warned, will lead “to an explosive situation among the island’s olive oil producers, who already have to endure multiple hardships.

    “The problem needs to be addressed as fast as possible, so that oil producers are compensated before we are faced with an explosive situation,” he added.

    ekathimerini

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    The regional governor of Crete, Stavros Arnaoutakis, on Wednesday wrote to the leadership of the Agricultural Development Ministry requesting funds to prop up the island’s olive oil producers, who are expected to face a revenue shortfall of 150 million euros this year. Weather... 
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