Olive Oil – Health and Beauty Benefits

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  • What You Need To Know about Olive Nutritional Facts

    Olives are fruits of the tree known as Olea europaea. ‘Olea’ is the Latin word for ‘oil,’ reflecting the olives very high fat content, of which 75% is oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat that has been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels. ‘Europaea’ reminds us that olives are native to the Mediterranean region of Europe.

    Olive is a drupe or stone-fruit with a central single seed, surrounded by edible pulp. Their size and shape greatly varies depending on the cultivar type.

    On an average, a fruit weighs about 3-5 g. Raw fruits are green, which turn yellow to dark as it ripens further. Its fruits are generally picked at stages, whether they destined to be used as table fruits or pressed for oil.

    Traditionally, olives have been viewed as very healthy food. The fruit provides calories; contain significant amounts of plant-derived anti-oxidants, minerals, phyto-sterols, and vitamins.

    Olives are a moderate source of calories; 100 g of fruits provide just 115 calories. Their calorie content basically comes from fats. Nonetheless, the fruit composes healthy fat in the form of mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) like oleic acid (18:1) and palmitoleic acid (16:1) that help lower LDL or “bad cholesterol” and increase HDL or “good cholesterol” in the blood. Research studies suggest that Mediterranean diet, which is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids help to prevent coronary artery disease and strokes by favoring healthy blood lipid profile.

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    Olives are fruits of the tree known as Olea europaea. ‘Olea’ is the Latin word for ‘oil,’ reflecting the olives very high fat content, of which 75% is oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat that has been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels. ‘Europaea’... 
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  • Healthy holiday eating Q&A with an Emory Healthcare cardiologist

    With holiday parties in full swing, many people are staying busy and eating on the go or overindulging in sweet party treats. Gina Lundberg, MD, the clinical director of Emory Women’s Heart Center and assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine answers questions from the general public on how to make smart food and drink decisions during the holidays.

    Are certain oils more “heart healthy” than others? Like olive vs. coconut?

    The healthiest oils are olive and canola oil. Coconut has more saturated fat and isn’t as healthy. Olive and canola oils work best for veggies, but may not be as good for baking. When baking, I would use spray oil like coconut or peanut oil, which taste better in baked dishes.

    One of the problems with people knowing olive oil is healthy is that people tend to consume too much. The Mediterranean Diet suggests 4 tablespoons of olive oil per person per day max.

    What are some entrée or side substitutions I can make without losing the “holiday” touch?

    Turkey and ham are both lean meat, so entrees aren’t usually the problem. The side dishes are usually where we run into trouble. Feel free to have your ham, turkey, and even lean pork and beef, but try to avoid the potato-heavy, cheesy side dishes.

    Try to go heavier on green veggies instead. Veggies like broccoli and cauliflower make you feel full. Sweet potatoes are also great but try to avoid adding the marshmallows and extra sugar.

    I tend to eat a healthy plant based diet about 90 percent of the time so on the holidays I basically eat what I like. Is this strategy okay for someone like me? I do aerobic and strength training exercises about 120 minutes four times a week.

    We ask most women to do 150-180 minutes of cardio exercise per week, so you’re doing great there! My concern regarding your diet would be that if you don’t normally eat fatty foods, you might find yourself with an upset stomach that could disrupt your holidays! I would still try to make healthy choices and not go overboard. All things in moderation–a few bites of cheesecake won’t ruin your healthy diet. Also, as you get older and your metabolism slows, it’s going to get harder to recover from splurges like this.

    I try to drink 64 oz. of water a day (although it’s a struggle to reach that through the holidays). Is that sufficient?

    Yes, for most people, 64 ounces is plenty! If you exercise a lot or sweat excessively, you may need to drink a little more. On the other hand, if you have kidney failure or congestive heart failure, you may need to drink less (just consult your physician). Also, alcohol can be dehydrating, so if your holiday celebrations involve alcohol, you may want to drink more to remain hydrated.

    I crave sweets every day. What can I do to satisfy my cravings without reaching for the chocolate?

    The more sugar you eat, the more you crave sugar. If you stick to a diet that is higher in protein, you’ll be more satisfied and won’t crave sugar as much. Eating healthier snacks more frequently (fruit, veggies, raw nuts) will stop you from being hungry and eating the wrong things.

    You may have heard that dark chocolate is healthy for you. All you need for the benefit of dark chocolate is about the size of one Hershey’s Kiss, so if you’d like to reward yourself with a few M&M’s or the fun-size versions of candy bars instead of large ones, do that and limit yourself to one per day. Also, try things with natural sugar. Fruits like pineapple and peaches are very high in sugar, and dried fruit can also be very sweet.

    I’ve heard that most of the sodium we consume doesn’t actually come from salt. Is that true and how much sodium should I have each day?

    Sodium from salt shakers makes up only about 15 percent of our daily sodium intake. The other 85 percent is in the processed foods in our diet. Anything that comes in a box, a bag or a can is high in sodium for the preservative effect, and most restaurant food and all fast food is very high in sodium.

    Be aware of foods that are low in fat or sugar, because they often add extra salt to achieve flavor. The low sodium diet we recommend is called the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension). Cook more of your fresh produce at home and use other seasonings to give your food flavor like lemon, pepper, garlic, cumin, tumeric, oregano, parsley etc.

    What’s the benefit of nuts? I’ve always read they are a healthy snack, but they are so high in fat.

    The main benefits of nuts are Omega-3 fatty acids and the high level of protein they provide. The healthiest nuts are walnuts and almonds, followed by pecans and pistachios. Peanuts have the most fat. Here’s the problem with snacking on nuts: The appropriate serving size is about 10 almonds, so they are easy to overeat. Be sure to limit yourself to just a handful. Adding almond slices to salads and veggies is a great way to add nuts into your diet.

    Dr. Oz recently said that brown rice is high in arsenic and that white rice is actually better for you. I love brown rice, but should I switch to using white rice?

    There is years of evidence that support the fact that brown rice is much healthier than white rice. There’s not enough research about arsenic in rice for us to say for certain. Bottom line: Brown is healthier for you, but if you’re concerned, dump the rice and eat quinoa instead!

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    With holiday parties in full swing, many people are staying busy and eating on the go or overindulging in sweet party treats. Gina Lundberg, MD, the clinical director of Emory Women’s Heart Center and assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine answers... 
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  • How extra virgin olive oil can help our bones?

    The incidence of osteoporosis and associated fractures is found to be lower in countries where the Mediterranean diet is predominant. These observations might be mediated by the active constituents of olive oil and especially phenolic compounds.

    The intake of olive oil has been related to the prevention of osteoporosis in experimental and in in vitro models. Very few prospective studies have evaluated the effects of olive oil intake on circulating osteocalcin (OC) in humans.

    The objective of the study led by Spanish researchers was to examine the longitudinal effects of a low-fat control diet (n = 34), a Mediterranean diet enriched with nuts (MedDiet+nuts, n = 51), or a Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil (MedDiet+VOO, n = 42) on circulating forms of OC and bone formation markers in elderly men at high cardiovascular risk.

    Consumption of a Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil for 2 years is associated with increased serum osteocalcin and P1NP concentrations, suggesting protective effects on bone.

    Age-related bone mass loss and decreased bone strength is an almost invariable feature of human biology, affecting women and men alike as an important determinant of osteoporosis and fracture risk.

    Nutritional factors are known to be involved in age-related bone loss associated with osteoblast insufficiency during continuous bone remodeling, in interaction with a combination of genetic, metabolic, and hormonal factors.

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    The incidence of osteoporosis and associated fractures is found to be lower in countries where the Mediterranean diet is predominant. These observations might be mediated by the active constituents of olive oil and especially phenolic compounds. The intake of olive oil has been... 
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  • Extra virgin olive oil could cut your heart attack risk in just six weeks

    Olive oil contains omega-6 fats, a form of healthy polyunsaturates which blocks the body’s response to inflammation in chronic conditions such as heart disease and arthritis. Olive oil unsaponifiable fraction, as poliphenols, exerts an anti-inflammatory role in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Olive oil consumption is associated with cardiovascular disease prevention because of both its oleic acid and phenolic contents.

    The capacity of olive oil phenolics to protect against low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation is the basis for a health claim by the European Food Safety Authority. Proteomic biomarkers enable an early, presymptomatic diagnosis of disease, which makes them important and effective, but understudied, tools for primary prevention.

    Glasgow researchers evaluated the impact of supplementation with olive oil, either low or high in phenolics, on urinary proteomic biomarkers of coronary artery disease (CAD), chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetes.

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    Olive oil contains omega-6 fats, a form of healthy polyunsaturates which blocks the body’s response to inflammation in chronic conditions such as heart disease and arthritis. Olive oil unsaponifiable fraction, as poliphenols, exerts an anti-inflammatory role in inflammatory... 
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  • Doctors emphasise health benefits of Mediterranean diet

    Good news for olive oil market as doctors emphasise health benefits of Mediterranean diet.

    An editorial published by doctors in the Postgraduate Medical Journal (PMJ) this month argues in favour of the health benefits produced by following a Mediterranean diet.

    Numerous senior figures in medicine put their name on the article, including Dr Mahiben Maruthappu, a senior worker in the NHS England and the chair of the Academy of Medical royal Colleges, Professor Terence Stephenson.

    The doctors explain that this diet raipdly reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes and may additionally prove a more effective way of losing weight than simply eating low-calorie foods.

    As a result, the editorial may have serious implications for the way others in the medical community respond to the obesity epidemic. In November this year, the British National Bariatric Surgery Registry revealed that nearly 40% of the under-25s in the UK who undergo weight loss surgery meet the classification standard for being “super obese”.

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    Good news for olive oil market as doctors emphasise health benefits of Mediterranean diet. An editorial published by doctors in the Postgraduate Medical Journal (PMJ) this month argues in favour of the health benefits produced by following a Mediterranean diet. Numerous senior... 
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  • Mediterranean diets with olive oil improve blood flow

    The health benefits of switching to a Mediterranean style diet and upping the amount of time spent exercising for a period of just eight weeks can still be seen a year after stopping the regime, a new study has shown.

    The research by Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Lincoln in the UK revealed that the diet and exercise combination leads to improved blood flow in cells in the inner lining of the blood vessels – called the endothelial cells – a full 12 months after completing participation in the intervention programme.

    Endothelial cells line the interior of the entire vascular system of the human body – from the large arteries to the smallest capillaries – and improvements in their function could reduce the risk of people developing cardiovascular disease, the study said.

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    The health benefits of switching to a Mediterranean style diet and upping the amount of time spent exercising for a period of just eight weeks can still be seen a year after stopping the regime, a new study has shown. The research by Sheffield Hallam University and the University... 
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  • Improve your vision with Olve Oil

    Eyes are very special and we need to take care of them regularly. If you’re too busy to take care of them regularly, you should at least take some care of them whenever possible. There are different diseases that can cause eye problems and may even lead to blindness. There are some common diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataracts, dry eye disease can be easily prevented with a little bit of care.

    The first thing you need to do is stop smoking. If you smoke, the risk of different eye related diseases such as glaucoma, cataracts, age-related macular degeneration and dry eyes increases a lot.

    Eat Spinach and Olive Oil

    Spinach is good for your eyes and you should eat more spinach. If you do not like the taste of spinach alone, you can add olive oil, garlic, raisins et cetera. Do not like the taste of pro-spinach, you can steam it, make spinach quiche, make spinach curries. Spinach contains a nutrient called lutein which is beneficial in preventing age-related macular degeneration and cataracts.

    In the ideal situation, you should take lutein along with fat, such as olive oil for better absorption.

    Get your computer screen below your eye level

    If you get your computer screen just below your eye level, your eyes will close slightly while looking at the computer screen and has a result the fluid evaporation from the eyes will reduce. It will also lower the risk of dry eye problem.

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    Eyes are very special and we need to take care of them regularly. If you’re too busy to take care of them regularly, you should at least take some care of them whenever possible. There are different diseases that can cause eye problems and may even lead to blindness. There... 
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  • Olive oil for anti-inflammatory and antioxidant therapy

    Olive oil has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory components. An oral diet provided with olive oil in patients with burn may accelerate wound healing and decrease the duration of hospitalization.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of consumption of oral olive oil on clinical outcomes and wound healing of thermally injured patients with hospital stays.

    One hundred patients (mean age; 33.34 ± 7 years) with 10–20% total body surface area, deep second degree and more burn wounds were randomized to receive either oral olive oil or sunflower oil as the oil in their diet.

    Patients were evaluated daily for occurrence of wound infection, sepsis and healing of the grafted skin. Also the duration of hospitalization and admission to the intensive care unit were compared in two groups.

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    Olive oil has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory components. An oral diet provided with olive oil in patients with burn may accelerate wound healing and decrease the duration of hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of consumption of oral olive... 
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  • Olive Oil in your diet, a matter of health

    Olive Oil vs other cooking fats: the Cretan – Greek alternative
    Its velvety texture and fine taste are not the only reasons that make olive oil ideal for your cooking or dressing.

    Olive oil is far more suitable compared to all other vegetable or animal cooking fats for many other reasons: it is produced solely by mechanical means and at very low temperature (cold extraction) with no added chemical processes that other oils undergo.

    Whereas various other vegetable oils are rich in harmful polyunsaturated fats and dairies abundant in saturated fats that undermine your health, olive oil is rich only in monounsaturated fats as high as 80% in content.

    Also, olive oil is high heat-resistant, an attribute that makes it ideal for frying as heat will not destroy its beneficial antioxidants and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Olive Oil and good health
    The medicinal qualities of olive oil have been recognized since the antiquity, as far back as Hippocrates’ codex.

    These attributes are scientifically confirmed today by contemporary scientists.

    International studies on past and contemporary Cretan cuisine where olive oil is prominent, have shown that this natural liquid extract contributes to overall health by providing antioxidants and other beneficial elements that promote good cardiovascular health and also contribute to the prevention of some forms of cancer.

    Due to its polyphenols, olive oil also helps our body to better absorb vitamins, etc.

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    Olive Oil vs other cooking fats: the Cretan – Greek alternative Its velvety texture and fine taste are not the only reasons that make olive oil ideal for your cooking or dressing. Olive oil is far more suitable compared to all other vegetable or animal cooking fats for... 
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  • Katie Holmes doles out beauty tips for busy mums

    With the never ending demand to be on your toes for household activities, your children or your professional life, your beauty regime is most likely to go for a toss. However, Katie Holmes gives out some tips and tricks that could work well for working or busy mums.

    Conditioned hair sans the conditioner

    The best way to skip those 10 minutes in the shower with conditioner on, is to oil your hair well the night before. Oil your hair with your regular hair oil (the best for deep conditioning is olive oil). Apply it throughly on your scalp and then on the hair shaft. To add to the moisturizing effect of the oil, you could wrap up your hair in a hot towel for a few minutes. If you don’t have the time for that, cover your hair with a shower cap. Wash your hair the next morning with your regular shampoo. Remember not to over shampoo your hair and pat dry your hair.

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    With the never ending demand to be on your toes for household activities, your children or your professional life, your beauty regime is most likely to go for a toss. However, Katie Holmes gives out some tips and tricks that could work well for working or busy mums. Conditioned... 
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  • A supplemented Mediterranean diet can lead to metabolic syndrome reversal...

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by risk factors that increase an individual’s chances for cardiovascular disease. These risk factors include obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol and uncontrolled blood glucose. In addition to cardiovascular disease, those with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. The Mediterranean diet is considered by many dieticians as a viable option for those suffering from diabetes and hypertension. A previous study with a one year follow-up has shown the diet’s ability to reverse metabolic syndrome.

    The purpose of this study was to use a longer follow-up of 4.8 years to determine the long-term impact of the Mediterranean diet on metabolic syndrome. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Mediterranean diet with supplemental extra virgin olive oil, Mediterranean diet with supplemental nuts or advice for following a low-fat diet. The primary outcome for this study was metabolic syndrome status, both incidence and reversal. Having metabolic syndrome was defined as having at least three of the cardiometabolic risk factors previously discussed. Cox regression analysis was used to determine the hazard ratios and to calculate the confidence intervals.

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    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by risk factors that increase an individual’s chances for cardiovascular disease. These risk factors include obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol and uncontrolled blood glucose. In addition to cardiovascular disease, those with metabolic... 
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  • Olive oil diet could help your heart

    Some ate a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil, others ate a Mediterranean diet with added nuts and the rest ate a low-fat diet.

    London – Eating a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil could help reverse symptoms which can lead to heart disease, research has revealed.

    A study found people who followed a diet of fruit, vegetables, fish and whole grains, with either added olive oil or nuts, reduced their obesity and blood glucose levels – both symptoms of metabolic syndrome.

    A low-fat diet did not have the same effect.

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    Some ate a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil, others ate a Mediterranean diet with added nuts and the rest ate a low-fat diet. London – Eating a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil could help reverse symptoms which can lead to heart disease, research... 
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  • Research shows Olive Leaf is a powerful antioxidant

    The results of a new research review highlighted by OVIVO, a new antioxidant Organic Olive Leaf Infusion drink, has revealed that the olive leaf has even higher levels of healthy antioxidants than previously thought.

    The new paper reveals the health benefits of the plant compound hydroxytyrosol — one of the most powerful naturally occurring antioxidants known to man. Hydroxytyrosol is found in olives and olive oil, but the highest concentrations occur in the leaf.

    OVIVO Organic Olive Leaf Infusion also has up to 30 beneficial plant compounds and phytochemicals found in the Mediterranean diet in one handy, concentrated dose.

    A double-blind study found a twice-a-day 500mg dose of olive extract was as effective as an ACE inhibitor at reducing both diastolic and systolic blood pressure, but unlike the prescription-only blood pressure pill, the extract also significantly lowered levels of dangerous triglicerides.

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    The results of a new research review highlighted by OVIVO, a new antioxidant Organic Olive Leaf Infusion drink, has revealed that the olive leaf has even higher levels of healthy antioxidants than previously thought. The new paper reveals the health benefits of the plant compound... 
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  • Effects of maternal dietary olive oil on diabetic embryopathy

    Maternal diabetes induces a pro-oxidant/pro-inflammatory intrauterine environment related to the induction of congenital anomalies.

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are transcription factors that regulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory pathways.

    Researchers investigated whether maternal diets supplemented with olive oil, enriched in oleic acid, a PPAR agonist, can regulate the expression of PPAR system genes, levels of lipoperoxidation and activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs) in embryos and decidua from diabetic rats.

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    Maternal diabetes induces a pro-oxidant/pro-inflammatory intrauterine environment related to the induction of congenital anomalies. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) are transcription factors that regulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory pathways. Researchers... 
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  • Health Benefits of Olive Oil

    Most of us have heard that Extra Virgin Olive Oil is good for your health, but what exactly makes it so good for you? EVOO’s number one health claim is that it reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease – which also happens to be the number one cause of death in the United States, the Food and Drug Administration approved a qualified health claim for olive oil indicating a reduced risk of heart disease. The best tasting and unprocessed Extra Virgin Olive Oil provides the most health benefits.

    There are a number of scientific studies that show olive oil can help prevent and treat heart disease. How does it do this, you might wonder? Olive oil actually protects against heart disease by helping to control the “bad” cholesterol (LDL) levels while simultaneously increasing the “good” cholesterol (HDL) levels in the body. Approximately 2 tablespoons of a high quality Extra Virgin Olive Oil each day contains high amounts of antioxidants (vitamin E and phenols in particular) which help to lower LDL cholesterol levels and increase anti-oxidant compounds in the blood.

    The health benefits of Extra Virgin Olive Oil don’t stop there, however. New positive attributes of EVOO are being discovered regularly. Did you know that it helps boost your immune system, thus protecting against viruses? It’s true! In addition to that, it’s also been found to be very effective in warding off the following diseases:

    High Blood Pressure: In recent studies, systolic & diastolic blood pressure has been lowered thanks to the regular consumption of olive oil.

    Heart Disease: Heart disease is caused by a buildup of cholesterol, but the consumption of olive oil helps to lower these cholesterol levels- thus decreasing one’s risk for heart disease.

    Cancer: There is a phytonutrient, oleocanthal, that is found in olive oil which can reduce inflammation by mimicking the effects of ibuprofen. This has actually been seen to decrease the risk of breast cancer (and its recurrence)! There are currently a few other olive oil components that are being studied for their possible effects on cancer; these components include squalene and lignans.

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    Most of us have heard that Extra Virgin Olive Oil is good for your health, but what exactly makes it so good for you? EVOO’s number one health claim is that it reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease – which also happens to be the number one cause of death in the United... 
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  • The fat in olive oil is beneficial for failing hearts

    Scientists at the University of Illinois, in Chicago, have found that the fat in olive oil kick-starts failing hearts.

    Olive oil may reverse heart failure, scientists believe, after finding it helped diseased muscle to pump blood more effectively.
    The health-boosting properties of a Mediterranean Diet are well known, but until now, it has been unclear what was driving the benefits.
    Now researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered that oleate, the common fat in olive oil, helps failing hearts to use body fat as fuel.
    A healthy heart absorbs fat to keep pumping. But when the heart is damaged it can no longer process or store fat and so it becomes starved of energy.
    Not only does the heart no longer have the fuel it needs to work properly, but the toxic fat is left in the body where it can clog up arteries.

    Oleate appears to kick-start genes which produce enzymes which can break down fat so it can be absorbed by the heart.
    “These genes are often suppressed in failing hearts,” said Douglas Lewandowski of the University of Illinois in Chicago.
    “So the fact that we can restore beneficial gene expression, as well as more balanced fat metabolism, plus reduce toxic fat, just by supplying hearts with oleate is a very exciting finding.
    “This gives more proof to the idea that consuming healthy fats can have a significantly positive effect on cardiac health.”
    Around 750,000 people are living with heart failure in Britain, with 27,000 new cases each year.

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    Scientists at the University of Illinois, in Chicago, have found that the fat in olive oil kick-starts failing hearts. Olive oil may reverse heart failure, scientists believe, after finding it helped diseased muscle to pump blood more effectively. The health-boosting properties... 
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  • Extra virgin olive - therapeutic products for arthritis

    The consumption of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects.

    A wide range of evidence indicates that phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties.

    Scientists evaluated the effects of EVOO-polyphenol extract (PE) in a model of rheumatoid arthritis, the collagen-induced arthritis model in mice.

    On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen. On day 21, mice received a booster injection. PE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered once a day from days 29 to 41 to arthritic mice.

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    The consumption of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. Scientists evaluated the effects of EVOO-polyphenol... 
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