Olive Oil – Health and Beauty Benefits

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  • Best Type of Olive Oil for Cooking

    Olive oil is a fat that comes from the fruit of olive trees, and it is constantly cited as a crucial part of a healthy diet.

    There are various grades of olive oil, with extra virgin olive oil the highest and most expensive. It also carries more healthful properties than ordinary olive oils; the monounsaturated fat in extra virgin olive oil may lower total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein, or LDL (the “bad” cholesterol) in blood, according to the Harvard School of Public Health.

    When it comes to cooking, olive oil retains its beneficial attributes, but which types are the best to use when cooking without sacrificing flavor?

    Virgin olive oil, which is slightly lower quality then “extra,” is ideal for cold dishes or low-temperature cooking, according to Living Green Magazine.

    Olive oil with or without the word “pure” in the description is a combination of refined and virgin olive oil. “If the quality of the original oil isn’t good enough to be virgin or extra virgin, it is refined to remove the bad odors and flavors and then blended with some virgin to be called ‘olive oil’ again,” North American Olive Oil Association EVP Eryn Balch told Living Green. The heat used in the extraction process leaves this olive oil with fewer antioxidants, while keeping the same amount of monounsaturated fats — making it a great option for cooking and frying.

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    Olive oil is a fat that comes from the fruit of olive trees, and it is constantly cited as a crucial part of a healthy diet. There are various grades of olive oil, with extra virgin olive oil the highest and most expensive. It also carries more healthful properties than ordinary... 
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  • So What Exactly Is the Mediterranean Diet?

    It sounds almost too good to be true: A diet that has been shown to increase longevity and help to stabilize blood sugars, reduce “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides, lower blood pressure, and reduce your risk of several diseases—and that has enough variety and enough delicious foods that you’re actually happy to follow it.

    In fact, the Mayo Clinic states that “an analysis of more than 1.5 million healthy adults demonstrated that following a Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduced risk of death from heart disease and cancer, as well as a reduced incidence of Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.”

    There’s no “official” Mediterranean Diet—the term refers to the traditional foods and dishes from the countries along the Mediterranean Sea, circling from Spain and southern Europe all the way across North Africa to Morocco. The cuisines of these countries focus on vegetables and fruits, whole grains and legumes (like chickpeas or lentils), and fish:

    Think fragrant vegetable and lamb stews from Morocco or Turkey, creamy hummus and flatbreads from Israel, Lebanese tabbouleh, Greek-style chicken roasted with rosemary and lemon stuffed in the cavity, pasta primavera or marinara, and paella laden with a variety of fish and shellfish.

    Foods are seasoned with aromatic spices, fresh herbs, and garlic rather than only with salt. Portions are often small, but many dishes may be served with the idea that they will be shared—think Spanish tapas, Italian antipasti, or the mezze platters of Greece, Turkey, and the Middle East.

    What Foods Are Forbidden?

    Although no foods are off-limits, certain foods appear less frequently or look different from their American counterparts. Countries along the Mediterranean are often mountainous or arid, so the terrain and climate aren’t suited to grazing cattle. As a result, beef and dairy foods from cow’s milk are rare. Rather than butter, for example, the primary fat is olive oil; yogurt and cheeses are traditionally made from sheep’s or goat’s milk. Authentic Italian-style pizzas have thin crusts, with a light dusting of cheese and minimal meat, rather than stuffed crusts, extra cheese, and several types of meat.

    A few tips to making the most of the Mediterranean diet:

    1 Watch portion sizes. If you love pasta, measure out a serving based on the Nutrition Facts label on the box. (In general, a one-pound box of dry pasta provides eight servings. If you cook for four people and your family usually eats one box at a meal, remember to double the information on the label.)

    2 Limit high-fat foods. Opt for clear sauces (based on broth or wine) or veggie-based ones like tomato sauce, rather than creamy Alfredo or carbonara. Nuts and olives are a large part of the Mediterranean diet, but they are high in fat and should be eaten in moderate amounts—about a handful a day is enough to reap their benefits.

    3 Think calcium. Because milk isn’t a big part of the Mediterranean diet, be sure to get adequate calcium from low-fat yogurt or leafy greens, or talk to your doctor about supplements.

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    It sounds almost too good to be true: A diet that has been shown to increase longevity and help to stabilize blood sugars, reduce “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides, lower blood pressure, and reduce your risk of several diseases—and that has enough variety and enough delicious... 
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  • This is how You should be storing Olive Oil tips from the kitchen

    Where do you store your olive oil? It’s tempting — and awfully convenient – to store oil right next to the stove, within arm’s reach, but is that really the best spot?

    Olive oil is a pantry staple that we use almost daily, and whether you have a standard work-a-day oil, or fancy bottle of extra-virgin, the key to making sure it lasts is proper storage. So, now that you know the difference between regular and extra virgin olive oil, it’s time to make sure you’re storing it properly.

    3 Things to Keep Away from Olive Oil

    Olive oil has three enemies: oxygen, light, and heat. When exposed to those elements, the oil will turn rancid more quickly. The best way to prevent this (and extend your oil’s shelf life) is proper storage.

    The Right Way to Store Olive Oil

    When it comes to storing olive oil, there are two things to consider: where you store it and how you store it.

    Where to Store Olive Oil

    Olive oil should be stored in a cool, dry, dark cupboard, away from the heat and light. Choose a spot in the kitchen that’s away from the oven. The best temperature for storing oil is 57 degrees, though room temperature, or 70 degrees, is also okay.

    How: For a longer shelf life, don’t store oil in direct sunlight.

    How to Store Olive Oil

    Store olive oil in a dark-colored glass bottle, which helps to keep out the light, or in a stainless steel container. This will protect the oil from exposure to sunlight. If you buy your olive oil in a large tin, consider pouring smaller amounts in a dark-colored bottle to use as you need it.

    Avoid storing oil in plastic containers because chemicals from the plastic can seep into the oil. Also avoid reactive metal containers, like iron or copper, which can cause a reaction with the oil, making it unsafe.

    It’s also important to limit the oil’s exposure to oxygen. Over time, oxygen can degrade the quality of the oil, eventually turning it rancid. Use oil soon after buying it, and always keep it stored with a cap or lid.

    Do you have a favorite container for your olive oil? Live us message below, Thank You!

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    Where do you store your olive oil? It’s tempting — and awfully convenient – to store oil right next to the stove, within arm’s reach, but is that really the best spot? Olive oil is a pantry staple that we use almost daily, and whether you have a standard work-a-day... 
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  • Study: Dietary Supplementation with Olive Oil & Vascular Effects of Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Olive oil (OO) and fish oil (FO) supplements have beneficial effects on endothelial function.

    Objective:
    In this study we evaluated the potential efficacy of OO and FO in mitigating endothelial dysfunction and disruption of hemostasis caused by exposure to particulate matter (PM).

    Methods and Results:
    Forty-two participants (58±1 year old) received either 3 gram/day of OO, FO, or no supplements (naïve) for 4 weeks prior to undergoing 2-hr exposures to filtered-air and concentrated ambient particulate matter (CAP) (mean 253±16 µg/m3). Endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery (FMD) pre-, immediately post- and 20 hours post-exposure.

    Levels of endothelin-1 and markers of fibrinolysis and inflammation were also measured. FMD was significantly lower after CAP exposure in the naïve (–19.4%; 95% CI: –36.4, –2.3 per 100 µg/m3 CAP relative to baseline; p = 0.03) and FO groups (–13.7%; 95% CI: –24.5, –2.9; p = 0.01), but not in the OO group (–7.6%; 95% CI: –21.5, 6.3; p = 0.27).

    Tissue plasminogen activator levels were significant increased immediately after (11.6%; 95% CI: 0.8, 22.2; p = 0.04) and 20 hours after CAP exposure in the OO group. Endothelin-1 levels were significantly increased 20 hours after CAP exposure in the naïve group only (17.1%; 95% CI: 2.2, 32.0; p = 0.03).

    Conclusions:
    Short-term exposure to CAP induced vascular endothelial dysfunction. OO supplementation attenuated CAP-induced reduction of FMD and changes in blood markers associated with vasoconstriction and fibrinolysis, suggesting that OO supplementation may be an efficacious intervention to protect against vascular effects of exposure to PM.

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    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Olive oil (OO) and fish oil (FO) supplements have beneficial effects on endothelial function. Objective: In this study we evaluated the potential efficacy of... 
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  • Without a doubt, olive oil is the best of fats and oils

    In the bid for optimum health and vitality, the inclusion of dietary fats is often over-looked.

    However, when it comes to maintaining good health as we age, including adequate amounts of the right kinds of fats and oils is vital.

    Good fats provide the body with fuel alongside the feeling of fullness and can actually stimulate fat burning.

    Studies continue to show the value in supplementing our diet with additional essential fats to prevent and treat a broad spectrum of diseases.

    Distinguishing good fats from bad fats can be tricky, so we have put together our top eight healthy fats and oils.

    1. Olive Oil
    An integral part of the traditional ‘Mediterranean Diet’ which is associated with vitality, longevity and low incidence of chronic disease, extra virgin olive oil is widely prized for its health-promoting properties.

    It is particularly helpful in promoting optimal cardiovascular function, maintaining good blood flow and bettering cognitive function.

    Olive oil is associated with vitality, longevity and low incidence of chronic disease.

    2. Coconut Oil
    Rightly earning its title as a ‘superfood’, coconut oil is consumed in large amounts by some of the healthiest populations around the world.

    It is also brilliant for those looking to lose or maintain their weight.

    The fatty acids in coconut oil have been shown to speed up overall metabolism, helping people expend more energy compared with long-chain fats.

    It can also help with neurological disorders and can significantly benefit common skin issues.

    3. Borage Oil
    One of the most under-researched oils, borage oil is widely used as an anti-inflammatory support for a number of conditions including eczema, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Borage Oil can be hard to track down, so try taking it in supplement format, we recommend B – Hada which combines high quality borage oil with fish oils.

    Avocado oil has long been prized for its skin-boosting effects

    4. Hemp Seed Oil
    Named nature’s perfect food due to its balanced concentrations of omega fatty acids 3, 6 and 9.

    Studies have shown it can help support heart health and promote proper cardiovascular faction.

    It is also prized for its beneficial effect on hair, skin and nails, with people who regularly use and consume hemp oil reporting thicker and shinier hair, softer skin and stronger nails.

    5. Flax Seed Oil
    This oil contains the highest concentration of Omega 3 fatty acids and the right amount of consumption has been show to improve cardiovascular health as well as exhibiting chemopreventative effects against colon tumour developments.

    6. Pumpkin Seed Oil
    A great one for both men and women, research has found that it can significantly help improve prostate health due to its richness in zinc, as well as help women with the menopause as it can decrease blood pressure, hot flushes, headaches and other menopausal symptoms.

    7. Avocado Oil
    Avocado oil has long been prized for its skin-boosting effects.

    In addition to its nourishing, moisturising and protective fats, it also contains significant levels of antioxidants, such as Vitamin E, which help keep skin supple and smooth.

    8. Omega 3 Fish Oil
    Arguably the best type of fat, the fats produced by oily fish (salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines and anchovies) contain the highest concentrations of Omega 3 fatty acids which is proven to make a positive difference to heart and brain health as well as improving the skeletal system.

    Omega 3 fish oils can also be found in supplement form, so why not try UnoCardio 1000 which was recently named the highest quality fish oil on the market.

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    In the bid for optimum health and vitality, the inclusion of dietary fats is often over-looked. However, when it comes to maintaining good health as we age, including adequate amounts of the right kinds of fats and oils is vital. Good fats provide the body with fuel alongside... 
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  • 'Anti-tumor' Sicilian oil, pasta at Expo Milano 2015

    Two scientific studies will be presented at Expo Milano 2015 showing that consumption of Sicilian durum wheat and olive oil help to ward off disease.

    The studies were presented on Wednesday morning at the new oncology center at the Civico hospital.

    The research activity was conducted by the Gian Pietro Ballatore consortium and the Agrarian and Forestry Sciences Department at the University of Palermo in collaboration with Palermo’s Civico hospital.

    The Dieta Mediterranea e Salute (DIMESA) project made it possible to create a type of olive oil rich in polyphenols and bioactive compounds with antioxidant effects from certain Sicilian olive species selected by the Palermo university.

    The Innovazione in Cerealicoltura in Sicilia (ICS) project focused on Sicilian durum wheat, creating a type of pasta with ”extremely low risk” of contamination from mold and cancer-causing toxins.

    ”These results show how valuable our product heritage is in the food sector,” said regional councilor for productive activities Linda Vancheri, noting that ”we want to continue investing in research and innovation” in the sector.

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    Two scientific studies will be presented at Expo Milano 2015 showing that consumption of Sicilian durum wheat and olive oil help to ward off disease. The studies were presented on Wednesday morning at the new oncology center at the Civico hospital. The research activity was... 
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  • Neuroscience: Low vitamin E levels can affect brain health

    Vitamin E is available in olive oil, almonds, sunflower seeds, greens and avocados. However, most people exhibit a deficiency of the nutrient that is so vital for brain health.

    A diet deficient in vitamin E spells trouble for the brain and could lead to neurological damage by cutting off the supply of basic building blocks. Researchers at Oregon State University showed that zebrafish fed a diet deficient in vitamin E throughout their life had about 30% lower levels of biomarker DHA-PC placing them at higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

    “This research showed that vitamin E is needed to prevent a dramatic loss of a critically important molecule in the brain, and helps explain why vitamin E is needed for brain health,” said Maret Traber, the Helen P Rumbel Professor for Micronutrient Research in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at OSU and lead author on this research.

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    Vitamin E is available in olive oil, almonds, sunflower seeds, greens and avocados. However, most people exhibit a deficiency of the nutrient that is so vital for brain health. A diet deficient in vitamin E spells trouble for the brain and could lead to neurological damage by... 
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  • Olive oil do’s and dont’s

    Buy only extra-virgin olive oil! Olive oil is best when it’s fresh, so use it as soon as possible.

    – It’s typical for olive oils to be made of a “field blend” of different varieties of olives grown in a region. But stay away from industrial blends, which combine oils from all over the Mediterranean. Such producers may, for example, boost the flavor of a cheap Tunisian olive oil with oils from Italy or southern Spain. You’ll have no idea the origin, handling or flavor of the olives.

    – Look for a harvest date on the label. If there’s no harvest date, look for the “use by” date. The “use by” date is tricky because it’s 18 months from the time the oil was put in the bottle – and olive oil is not bottled instantly. The oil could already be 18 months old when it’s put in the bottle, and then add another 18 months to that “and you’re getting some pretty old oil,” Jenkins said.

    olive oil testing

    – “Cold extracted” is a meaningless term on a label because all extra-virgin olive oil is cold extracted.

    – Look for the “protected denomination of origin” designation, which will appear on the label as DOP for Italian oils, DO for Spain, PDO for Greece and AOC for France, and which offer extra assurance of good quality.

    – Store olive oil in a cool, dark place and it will last for two years. After that, if it’s been properly handled, it will still be fine for certain uses, such as cooking.

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    Buy only extra-virgin olive oil! Olive oil is best when it’s fresh, so use it as soon as possible. – It’s typical for olive oils to be made of a “field blend” of different varieties of olives grown in a region. But stay away from industrial blends, which combine... 
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  • Beauty Benefits Of Olive Oil

    Most of us are aware of the beauty benefits of olive oil. It is an affordable ingredient and may be, that is why it is used in most of the beauty products. This oil is also used for cooking purposes.

    As this oil is also good for skin, it can be used externally as well as for edible purposes. There are several health benefits that this oil offers. It promotes digestion, stimulates your metabolism and offers vitamins and minerals to your body.

    Though most of us have started using olive oil for beauty purposes, it is a fact that it has been used since centuries. It is good for nails, skin and hair.

    In Egypt, this oil was used to treat hair many centuries ago. Get Rid Of Acne Scars With Olive Oil You can use olive oil on your skin as well as your hair too. Now, let us discuss about the beauty benefits of olive oil.

    Beauty Benefits Of Olive Oil 2

    Dry Skin
    This is one of the beauty benefits of olive oil for skin. It can soften your dry skin fast. After your shower, apply a few drops of oil on your body and wait for a few minutes till it gets absorbed.

    Hands
    If you wish to soften your hands, using olive oil is the best thing to do. You can use a few drops of oil on your hands and lather before you wash.

    Dandruff
    If your scalp is dry and itchy or if you have dandruff issues, use olive oil on your scalp at least thrice a week and see the difference.

    Shiny Hair
    Heat a few drops of olive oil and allow it to cool. Use the warm oil on your scalp and massage your hair. You can make your hair shiny. This is one of the beauty benefits of olive oil for hair.

    Itchy Skin
    If your skin is itchy, use a few drops of this oil and lather the affected area and wash it after a few minutes.

    Make Up Removal
    Instead of using any other product, you can use olive oil for make up removal. Just dip some cotton in a this oil and start rubbing your face to remove the make up.

    Wrinkles

    One of the benefits of olive oil is that it can prevent wrinkles on your skin. If you use it regularly, you will be able to prevent wrinkles as it keeps your skin soft.

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    Most of us are aware of the beauty benefits of olive oil. It is an affordable ingredient and may be, that is why it is used in most of the beauty products. This oil is also used for cooking purposes. As this oil is also good for skin, it can be used externally as well as for... 
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  • Oleocanthal in extra virgin olive oil rapidly and selectively induces cancer cell death

    The researchers, nutritional scientist Paul Breslin (Rutgers University), biologist David Foster (Hunter College) and chemist Onica LeGendre (Hunter College) investigated the effect of oleocanthal (OC) on human cancer cell lines in culture.

    Oleocanthal, a phenolic compound in extra virgin olive oil, has been implicated in the health benefits associated with diets rich in olive oil.

    Amazingly, oleocanthal induced cell death in all cancer cells examined – as rapidly as 30 minutes after treatment in the absence of serum.

    OC treatment of non-transformed cells suppressed proliferation, but did not cause cell death.

    Oleocanthal induced both primary necrotic and apoptotic cell death via induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP).

    Researchers provide evidence that oleocanthal promotes LMP by inhibiting acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity, which destabilizes the interaction between proteins necessary for lysosomal membrane stability.

    The data presented here indicates that cancer cells having fragile lysosomal membranes – as compared to non-cancerous cells – are susceptible to lysosomotropic agent-induced cell death. Therefore, targeting lysosomal membrane stabiltiy represents a novel approach to induce cancer-specific cell death.

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    The researchers, nutritional scientist Paul Breslin (Rutgers University), biologist David Foster (Hunter College) and chemist Onica LeGendre (Hunter College) investigated the effect of oleocanthal (OC) on human cancer cell lines in culture. Oleocanthal, a phenolic compound in... 
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  • Some practical tips on how to use olive oil to protect the skin

    Olive oil is our best ally against the cold, snow and frost. The low temperatures are certainly not the best friends of our skin. When the climate is harsh, or alternate days and very cold days myths, is necessary to prevent damage to the skin.

    Why in winter the skin tends to dry out?

    Our body has mechanisms for prodigious perform its functions and meet the needs of ordinary and extraordinary that relate to life, adapting to the external environment.
    In winter, in order to maintain a constant body temperature, the body puts in place a mechanism known as vasoconstriction: the peripheral blood vessels constrict, so that less blood flow in the outer zones of the body. This is to prevent heat loss, that is holding back the blood and the heat inside: the goal is to operate at its best the vital internal organs: heart, liver, lungs, kidneys, intestines …
    The outside of the body (in this case, the skin and extremities) will then get by with less blood than usual. And, therefore, with less nourishment.

    That’s because the skin in winter sees decrease its functionality: less blood flowing means less oxygen and fewer nutrients that reach the skin and sebaceous glands. The effect will be a decrease in the hydro-lipid film and therefore less able to protect.
    Perceive our skin thinner, more sensitive, drier and more exposed to the elements.
    You can also create microcracks epidermal and, in more severe cases, cuts and painful injuries, such as fissures that appear at the ends of the fingers.
    Hands are particularly susceptible to problems, since the wash more often than other parts of the body, and this only delipidizzarle further, exposing more

    What is the solution? One: grease the skin. With the right fats and the right way.

    How to protect or treat skin assaulted by the cold?

    Many are natural fats that are good for your skin. One of the best is just our beloved olive oil, can riapportare lipids to the skin, to protect it from water loss through evaporation and nourish it, preserving the elasticity.
    Olive oil is an excellent protective shield for the hands and lips, and for all other areas of the body and face that “pull” or are damaged by cold. A shield that still allows the skin to breathe.

    Here are some practical tips on how to use olive oil to protect the skin when the climate is harsh.

    Face

    Before going to bed, dip your fingers in olive oil and wipe it with a gentle massage, especially on dry or sensitive areas (lips, around the eyes, cheeks, etc.). It can also be massaged all over your face, if our skin is very dry. Be careful not to get it going in the eye.
    Allow to work for the oil alone for ten minutes, then apply moisturizer over the usual, all over your face.
    Our cream will blend well to oil, allowing the oil itself to be more easily absorbed by the skin.
    This treatment should be performed every night, and can be repeated in the morning before leaving home.
    Typically the skin quickly incorporates the oil, especially if it is very dry. But if you perceive your skin too “greasy”, just wait 10-15 minutes for the oil to be absorbed along with the cream. If even so the sentissimo too greasy, just lightly dab your face with a tissue, just before you leave home.

    Hands

    For the hands treatment is analogous, and the amount of oil can be increased.
    Before going to bed, well ungiamole oil, insisting in the grooves, on the back and on the nails. Then we apply a cream (any hand cream or body) to help the oil to soak.
    This should be the last thing to do before going to sleep (also to avoid touching anywhere with greasy hands!)
    In the morning, the treatment can be repeated.
    Recall that the fact that the skin is oily is a positive, it means that your skin is slowly absorbing the oil. But if you just can not bear to leave fingerprints of oil, just rub your palms and fingertips with a handkerchief before leaving the house (on the back no, it is better to leave it to absorb grease and oil slowly).
    When we go out, we try to wear gloves to protect the skin further.

    Supply

    Move towards a diet rich in vitamins and minerals can certainly come in handy, because their deficiency can make your skin more fragile and therefore more easily attacked.
    Eat fruits and vegetables in winter, raw and cooked, will help us to tolerate the winter making good vitamins, minerals and other nutrients (essential not only for the skin but also to support our natural defenses by seasonal ailments).

    Olive oil, with its contribution of unsaturated fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins (like vitamin E) and other antioxidants can help to ensure the long-elasticity of the skin and its defenses.
    Need to limit red meat, preferring legumes, fish, poultry, eggs. Also useful to introduce spices instead of salt, and slightly increase this season the consumption of dried fruit.
    It ‘s always advisable to drink at least 1.5-2 liters of water a day, because the moisture must be supported with external and internal, without which our efforts would be in vain. If we did not want to drink water, we can opt for hot drinks that, in addition to give a little ‘heat and relief from a cold day, can facilitate the process of hydration (and winter is perhaps the most pleasant to drink).

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    Olive oil is our best ally against the cold, snow and frost. The low temperatures are certainly not the best friends of our skin. When the climate is harsh, or alternate days and very cold days myths, is necessary to prevent damage to the skin. Why in winter the skin tends to... 
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  • Mediterranean Diet May Reduce Stroke Risk, So Break Out The Olive Oil

    The Mediterranean diet has become increasingly popular for weight loss, but new research suggests it could also reduce one’s risk of suffering a stroke.

    The findings show people who closely followed the diet were significantly less likely to experience an ischemic stroke (caused by a blood clot) compared with those who had the lowest adherence to the diet, HealthDay reported.

    The diet includes fresh fruits and vegetables, legumes and nuts, whole grains, fish, lean poultry and plenty of olive oil. It limits the consumption of red meats, dairy, sugar and saturated fats.

    “Overall, there is strong evidence, based on this study, that strict adherence to a Mediterranean diet significantly reduces stroke risk,” Dr. Paul Wright, chair of neurology at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. told HealthDay. The researcher noted the study was not able to identify a solid cause-and-effect relationship between the diet and a reduced stroke risk.

    To make their findings the researchers looked at data from more than 104,000 teachers in California, with an average age of 52 years. These participants were split into five groups based on how closely they followed the Mediterranean diet.

    “[The study accounted for] other factors that would reduce stroke risks, such as exercise, total caloric intake,body mass index, smoking and menopausal/hormonal status,” Wright said.

    The findings were to be presented Thursday at the American Stroke Association’s annual meeting in Nashville. The study was led by Dr. Ayesha Sherzai, a neurologist at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City. The researchers noted there was no observed link between following a Mediterranean diet and a reduced risk of a bleeding (hemorrhagic) stroke.

    Article By Rebekah Marcarelli, a href=”http://www.hngn.com/articles/69428/20150213/mediterranean-diet-may-reduce-stroke-risk-so-break-out-the-olive-oil.htm”>source

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    The Mediterranean diet has become increasingly popular for weight loss, but new research suggests it could also reduce one’s risk of suffering a stroke. The findings show people who closely followed the diet were significantly less likely to experience an ischemic stroke... 
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  • Ingredient in Olive Oil Looks Promising in the Fight Against Cancer

    Extra-virgin olive oil contains an ingredient, oleocanthal, that kills cancer cells without harming healthy cells, researchers have found.

    A Rutgers nutritional scientist and two cancer biologists at New York City’s Hunter College have found that an ingredient in extra-virgin olive oil kills a variety of human cancer cells without harming healthy cells.

    The ingredient is oleocanthal, a compound that ruptures a part of the cancerous cell, releasing enzymes that cause cell death.

    Paul Breslin, professor of nutritional sciences in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, and David Foster and Onica LeGendre of Hunter College, report that oleocanthal kills cancerous cells in the laboratory by rupturing vesicles that store the cell’s waste. LeGendre, the first author, Foster, the senior author, and Breslin have published their findings in Molecular and Cellular Oncology.

    According to the World Health Organization’s World Cancer Report 2014, there were more than 14 million new cases of cancer in 2012 and more than 8 million deaths.

    Scientists knew that oleocanthal killed some cancer cells, but no one really understood how this occurred. Breslin believed that oleocanthal might be targeting a key protein in cancer cells that triggers a programmed cell death, known as apoptosis, and worked with Foster and Legendre to test his hypothesis after meeting David Foster at a seminar he gave at Rutgers.

    “We needed to determine if oleocanthal was targeting that protein and causing the cells to die,” Breslin said.

    After applying oleocanthal to the cancer cells, Foster and LeGendre discovered that the cancer cells were dying very quickly – within 30 minutes to an hour. Since programmed cell death takes between 16 and 24 hours, the scientists realized that something else had to be causing the cancer cells to break down and die.

    LeGendre, a chemist, provided the answer: The cancer cells were being killed by their own enzymes. The oleocanthal was puncturing the vesicles inside the cancer cells that store the cell’s waste – the cell’s “dumpster,” as Breslin called it, or “recycling center,” as Foster refers to it. These vesicles, known as lysosomes are larger in cancer cells than in healthy cells, and they contain a lot of waste. “Once you open one of those things, all hell breaks loose,” Breslin said.

    But oleocanthal didn’t harm healthy cells, the researchers found. It merely stopped their life cycles temporarily – “put them to sleep,” Breslin said. After a day, the healthy cells resumed their cycles.

    The researchers say the logical next step is to go beyond laboratory conditions and show that oleocanthal can kill cancer cells and shrink tumors in living animals. “We also need to understand why it is that cancerous cells are more sensitive to oleocanthal than non-cancerous cells,” Foster said.

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    Extra-virgin olive oil contains an ingredient, oleocanthal, that kills cancer cells without harming healthy cells, researchers have found. A Rutgers nutritional scientist and two cancer biologists at New York City’s Hunter College have found that an ingredient in extra-virgin... 
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  • Olive leaf extract may help in treating ailments

    Today, we are extracting some powerful medicines from plants from all over the world. The olive is one plant that may hint at some of the extraordinary abilities God may have built into some of the extinct plants. We’ve all heard about the health effects of olive oil. However, it turns out the olive leaf also provides some very healthy extracts.

    One extract, oleuropein, found in all parts of the olive plant, has been shown to delay the formation of poisons formed by mold growing in nut meal. It can also stop the growth of one type of staphylococcus. Other studies suggest this extract may relax the smooth muscles of artery walls, temporarily lowering blood pressure. In addition, it may help the heart function better and inhibit the formation of clogging plaques in the bloodstream. Other extracts from the olive leaf have been shown not only to be antioxidants, but also to slow the production of poisons or even destroy certain bacteria.

    Olive leaf extract is also thought to be effective in helping the body to routinely combat numerous pathogens as well as help restore a flagging immune system. It can destroy many pathogens such as viruses, fungi, bacteria, etc. by interfering with their ability to replicate, which prevents them from spreading. In addition, researchers found that olive leaf extract also helps to destroy viruses by stimulating the body’s immune system to produce more disease-fighting cells.

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    Today, we are extracting some powerful medicines from plants from all over the world. The olive is one plant that may hint at some of the extraordinary abilities God may have built into some of the extinct plants. We’ve all heard about the health effects of olive oil. However,... 
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  • St. Paul’s Hospital in Canada to launch Mediterranean diet course for the public

    St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver is making plans to train hundreds, if not thousands, of people to eat according to the principles of the life-saving Mediterranean diet.

    “Truly changing the way you eat is a massive undertaking,” said physician Andrew Ignaszewski, who is head of cardiology at the hospital. “For people with a northern European or Eastern European pedigree, the Mediterranean diet does not come naturally, the specifics are not intuitive and need to be taught.”

    The course is likely to include educational seminars, group counselling and regular support sessions spread over at least a year, including shopping excursions and cooking instruction.

    Buoyed by the stunning results of a rare long-term diet study conducted with almost 8,000 subjects in Spain, Ignaszewski and his colleagues felt they could help more than just their cardiac patients.

    “There are 10 times more people at risk of cardiovascular disease than people who have been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease,” said Ignaszewski.

    The study, published last year by the New England Journal of Medicine, placed healthy people at risk of cardiac disease into three groups: a simple low-fat diet, a relatively high-fat Mediterranean diet supplemented with large amounts of extra virgin olive oil, and a Mediterranean diet supplemented with large amounts of walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts.

    Over five years, the two Mediterranean diet groups had a 30-per-cent lower chance of heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular disease than people on the low-fat diet.

    Such randomized control trial studies are rare and very difficult to execute over a long period of time, but the researchers met regularly with participants and even conducted urine and blood tests to ensure people were complying with the diet they were assigned.

    “Cardiologists live and die by evidence based medicine and once in a while a study comes along that changes our practice,” said Ignaszewski, who called the effect produced by the researchers “huge.”

    “This lifestyle change had the same effect on their relative risk as the most potent medications,” he said. Because the level of physical activity and subjects’ weight was unchanged across all three groups, what people ate was the critical factor, rather than weight loss or exercise.

    Ignaszewski noted the irony that people in the low-fat control group, who had the worst health outcomes, were given the same advice that most cardiac patients receive in North America.

    Low-fat diets designed to lower cholesterol — pushed by doctors and others for decades in North America — have also had the unfortunate side-effect of fuelling an epidemic of diabetes, he said.

    Training people how to eat differently requires a long-term intervention, which is what the new course at St. Paul’s is designed to do.

    It is not enough to tell people to eat more fish and legumes, olive oil and nuts. For every new food that is added, other foods must be eliminated, Ignaszewski said.

    “You need to learn what to eat, day by day, three meals a day,” he said. “For the study subjects in Spain it was relatively easy, many of these things were already part of their diet, in North America it will be much tougher.”

    St. Paul’s Hospital will host a free information session in late January for people who indicate their interest be emailing predimed@providencehealth.bc.ca.

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    St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver is making plans to train hundreds, if not thousands, of people to eat according to the principles of the life-saving Mediterranean diet. “Truly changing the way you eat is a massive undertaking,” said physician Andrew Ignaszewski, who is... 
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  • 10 Paths to Good Health with Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    The Decalogue of The Prevention

    A diet rich in olive oil, particularly extra virgin olive oil, may increase life expectancy because:

    1. It can strengthen the immune system

    2. It may have an anti-inflammatory effect

    3. It can prevent cardiovascular diseases

    4. It reduces cholesterol levels

    5. It decreases the formation of free radicals and cellular aging correlated infarction

    6. It reduces the risk of thrombosis and atherosclerosis

    7. It can lower blood pressure

    8. It may reduce the incidence of some cancers

    9. It can improve the operating capacity of the pancreas

    10. It can have a positive impact on the emergence of diabetes

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    The Decalogue of The Prevention A diet rich in olive oil, particularly extra virgin olive oil, may increase life expectancy because: 1. It can strengthen the immune system 2. It may have an anti-inflammatory effect 3. It can prevent cardiovascular diseases 4. It reduces cholesterol... 
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  • Olive oil is common in diet tips of the world's longest living communities

    Low meat, high vege diet with olive oil and active lifestyle common in long-living communities

    The season of overindulgence is coming to a close: you’ve consumed your bodyweight in chocolate and your sole form of exercise has consisted of lifting a champagne glass while prostrate on the sofa.

    But, before you embark on January atonement, why not consider these simple diet tips from the world’s longest living communities?

    Ikaria

    Home to the largest proportion of 90-year-olds in the world, the people of Ikaria live 10 years longer than Europeans and Americans.

    With significantly lower rates of cancer, heart disease, dementia and depression, the Greek island’s mountainous terrain and limited transport force locals to remain extremely active well into their 80s and 90s. The Ikarian diet revolves around an abundance of olive oil, copious amounts of fruit and vegetables, and very little processed food.

    The inhabitants’ longevity is sometimes attributed to a mountain herbal tea containing spleenwort, purple sage, mint and rosemary.

    Okinawa

    With one of the highest life expectancies in the world, the people of Okinawa, Japan, know a thing or two about longevity. Low in calories but nutrient rich, the Okinawan diet consists largely of fish and vegetables.

    Inhabitants eat very little meat and dairy, instead opting for squid and octopus, which are thought to lower cholesterol and blood pressure due to their high levels of taurine.

    Okinawans eat more tofu and kombu seaweed than anyone else in the world and favour sweet potatoes – which are low GI and rich in antioxidants – over white.

    Sardinia

    With an unusually high proportion of centenarians, the people of Sardinia attribute their longevity to the island’s unpolluted air, stress-free lifestyle and healthy diet.

    Rich in olive oil, vegetables and nuts, the Sardinian diet is low in meat, but occasionally features lean meats and oily fish. Sardinians drink wine made from grapes rich in polyphenols and other antioxidants which are thought to decelerate the ageing process.

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    Low meat, high vege diet with olive oil and active lifestyle common in long-living communities The season of overindulgence is coming to a close: you’ve consumed your bodyweight in chocolate and your sole form of exercise has consisted of lifting a champagne glass while... 
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