• Attend online course "Food labelling" & learn how to meet consumer demand for information

    Ainia Technology Center will begin next October 28th the 17th edition of the online course “Food labelling” which will explain the requirements for food labelling and the specific assumptions in labelling foods that may contain allergens or aimed at children, those with health claims and other products called “without”, “natural” or “traditional”, among others.

    According to Ainia, 90% of consumers read the labels of the products they buy. This percentage reaches 100% in cases where the consumer has a conditioned power for some health-related factor.

    The course will also explain how to identify the basic elements for food labelling according to the law and how to avoid confusion in the naming of the product.

    Also, as reported by Ainia, the correct way to list ingredients will be displayed, as well as how to identify allergens, highlight the main ingredients in the labelling, the correct indication of the net quantity of the food, how to display the date of minimum durability, the expiration date or the storage conditions and/or usability.

    This training activity, aimed at professionals in the food industry and university students and postgraduates will explain what are the stages in the implementation of mandatory nutrition labelling using case studies as well as the specific constraints on food labeling according to category or segment of the food to which they belong.

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    Ainia Technology Center will begin next October 28th the 17th edition of the online course “Food labelling” which will explain the requirements for food labelling and the specific assumptions in labelling foods that may contain allergens or aimed at children, those... 
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  • Argali is the Name of the New Superior Organic Olive Oil from Greece

    The olives are so many and so beautiful, they are ripe at the right point and, thanks to the rains last month, their pulp is soft and swollen.
    A new harvesting season starts in middle of November. We are very excited and look forward soon to taste the New Superior Organic Olive Oil Argali!

    His name is Giovanni Bianchi and he is a small organic olive oil producer in Gargalianoi (Messinia), Greece.

    After years of insistence by relatives and friends, finally the birth of the brand “ARGALI” to enable people who seek quality in nutrition and respect for the environment to buy their superior organic olive oil.

    In 2015 the EVOO produced by Giovanni Bianchi achieved a “Diplome Gourmet” at AVPA Paris and a distinction in the international competition “L’Orciolo D’Oro”.

    In a few words about Argali Organic Olive Oil

    argaki_01Giovanni Bianchi comments:
    Thank you for giving us a little of your time. We are going to show you who we are, what we do and our product : organic olive-oil.

    Few years ago we coincidentally get involved with the Greece and strongly linked to his history, natural beauties and obviously, we immediately loved one of his best product: the olive’s oil.

    We strongly believe in an full organic approach to food production, against the money profit ideal on which is founded the actually way to make business. We are trying to adapt the protection of natural resources, the respect of nature, a not invasive and unnaturally way of production with our desire to offer you our final product.

    What we do

    Our work is in progress, since we are a young company, our target is not the profit but instead the great chance to share with you our superior organic olive oil. We got almost 200 olive trees in Gargaliani. In our olive grove no fertilizers, pesticides or weed killers are used whatsoever.

    Since 2007 we are certified BioHellas, the most important greek “Inspection and Certification body for organic products”. The soil is fertilized with olive leaves retrieved from the olive mill and the olive trees are not watered.

    ravdoThe olive trees of the Koroneiki variety are perfectly adapted to the dry climate and rocky terrain. The fruits are very small, black and green and are very dense clusters on the branches. While the usual olive oil yield is approximately 10 liters per tree, in our cultivation the trees produce only 2 to 5 liters of the purest green extra virgin olive oil. We deliberately sacrifice quantity to produce the best quality oil with a very light ecological footprint.

    Harvest time is in November and December and the olives are pressed within 12 hours of harvesting to ensure very low acidity. Pressing takes place at 27 degrees Celsius so that the oil maintains its aroma and a large amount of polyphenols (natural antioxidants).

    Where we are

    Our olive grove is in Gargaliani, Messenia. Gargaliani is a small town in the west Peloponnese, situated on a small rising that overlooks a vast valley of olives.

    This beautiful view of green olive groves contrasts with the deep blue of the sea, and in the background there is the picturesque island of Proti. This is the area where Nestor, King of Pilo and one of the Argonauts reigned, and to whom Telemaco turned, when he was searching for his father Ulysses, after the Trojan War.

    For anyone looking for a healthy food and unique taste. Our Organic Olive Oil is ARGALI is ready for you!telara

    You can Buy Argali Organic Olive Oil directly from company website

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    The olives are so many and so beautiful, they are ripe at the right point and, thanks to the rains last month, their pulp is soft and swollen. A new harvesting season starts in middle of November. We are very excited and look forward soon to taste the New Superior Organic Olive... 
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  • Greece will have a prominent role at the WOOE thanks to Gaea Products

    The organizers of the World Olive Oil Exhibition are happy to announce that Aris Kefalogiannis will be one of the key speakers at our Cycle of Conferences on March 2016. The importance of such a professional is that he is not only a successful entrepreneur who has created Gaea, the main international Greek food and olive oil brand, but he is also an ambassador of the Greek food industry and olive oil sector.

    Aris Kefalogiannis managed to lead Gaea in major international markets to the number one Greek brand, gaining numerous international awards for product quality and taste, while Gaea’s extra virgin olive oils are the 1st Carbon Neutral Olive Oils worldwide. Gaea was awarded with the 2013 Import/Export category at the European Business Awards, the 1st Greek company ever to be awarded at this prestigious competition.

    GAEA_EVOO_DOP_KALAMATA_greentubeGaea products are exported to 26 countries, including the USA, Germany, the UK, Russia, and Norway.

    Aris Kefalogiannis is the Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Greek Confederation of Olive Oil Industries (SEVITEL) and, it is worth noting that he is also an Olympic champion with the Greek national water polo team, at the Los Angeles Olympics, held in 1984 (ranked 7th place); he also participated in the Moscow (1980) and Seoul (1988) Olympic Games.

    During a recent interview in the renowned magazine Olive Oil Times, Kefalogiannis analyzed and reflected upon some of the key features that are setting the critical current situation of his country, Greece, and its businesspeople. “Production and exports have continued without interruption during the financial crisis, even after banks were closed and capital controls imposed, with Gaea introducing a new olive oil and olive pack line in the United States on July 13”.

    Kefalogiannis says Gaea is not delaying anything during the crisis: “The target is to keep serving our clients every day; this is the most important thing. As long as we manage to do that, we are aware that we will be healthy and alive as a company. Our emphasis on crisis management is to continue operating and loading our orders”.

    Kefalogiannis suggests that “three pillars” could be central to an economic recovery: 1) the Greek diet, 2) tourism, including culinary tourism, and 3) shipping. “No matter how far you look into Greek history, you will see that olive oil dominates our diet. It is the basis of the Mediterranean diet, and all scientists attest to its benefits”. Featuring traditional Greek products, Gaea has been helping to introduce the traditional diet of Greece to the world, both as part of Mediterranean cuisine and in terms of its unique healthy features.

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    The organizers of the World Olive Oil Exhibition are happy to announce that Aris Kefalogiannis will be one of the key speakers at our Cycle of Conferences on March 2016. The importance of such a professional is that he is not only a successful entrepreneur who has created Gaea,... 
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  • Navigating your way through the bevy of olive oils on the market

    Are you confused by the shelves upon shelves of olive oils staring back at you in the supermarket? The myriad brands and grades are overwhelming, and the range in prices makes things even more confusing. Which one should you buy? Stress no more! We’ve got your back. Read on for help navigating your way through the bevy of olive oils on the market.

    Know The Basics
    There are two different kinds of olive oil you should have in your kitchen: one you cook with and one you use as a condiment or a finishing component. Choose olive oil instead of butter or vegetable oil when cooking. And make a dish sing with a healthy drizzle of the good stuff right before serving.

    Cooking Olive Oils are intended for cooking and are typically less expensive than the full-bodied oils that you want to use on a dish right before serving. Filippo Berio and Bertolli both make good cooking oil versions. Their mild flavor means they won’t overpower a dish, so if you have other flavors you want to shine through, you can rest assured that they will.

    Condiment Olive Oils are generally more expensive than the cooking variety and typically provide a lot more flavor. These oils should be used to make dressings, dips, in place of butter on toast, or drizzled on top of finished dishes like pasta, vegetables, pizza, and grilled food.

    Virgin, Extra-Virgin & Light
    Olive oil is distributed and graded based on three things: flavor, acidity, and processing method. These grades are ultimately what will help you understand which olive oil to use and when. Check out the below for a quick primer on ranking.

    Extra-Virgin
    Consider this the haute couture of olive oil. There are a lot of ins and outs to getting the “extra-virgin” certification, but suffice it to say that olive oil manufacturers must fit a set of standards as dictated by the International Olive Oil Council (IOOC). The test is rated on a nine-point scale and only oils receiving a 6.5 or higher can claim the extra-virgin grade.

    Extra-virgin olive oil must also be bitter, featuring a pleasant but sharp sensation on the tongue. Finally, it should exhibit pungent characteristics, meaning it should provide an aromatic and peppery taste in the mouth.

    Virgin
    This oil, like extra-virgin, is pressed rather than refined — but it may have an acidity of 1 or 2%. Virgin olive oils must rank at least a 5.5 on the IOOC’s 9-point scale. In short, if this were the Academy Awards, Extra Virgin Olive Oil would receive Best Actor, and Virgin Olive Oil would receive Best Actor In A Supporting Role.

    Light
    Though the term “light” when it comes to food typically means it is lower in fat, light olive oil simply means that the oil has been refined. This oil is more similar to canola, corn, and peanut oils and is thus perfect for cooking. Don’t use this as a dip or dressing on a salad, as it lacks almost any flavor.
    What To Look For
    The most important thing to remember when buying and tasting olive oil is that you are never going to drink it like a glass of wine. Olive oil is first and foremost an ingredient, and you should therefore consider how you are going to use it.

    Smell
    Breathe it in. While aromas vary depending on region, all good olive oil should exhibit a sense of freshness. If you’re getting notes of pepper, fresh cut grass, rosemary, or artichoke, you’re on the right track to buying good oil. If it doesn’t smell fresh or exhibits a smell of vinegar, crayons, or rotten apples, then chances are, the oil is rancid.

    Color
    Many dispensers will forge the color of their oil to trick their consumers, so we don’t recommend choosing an olive oil simply based on color. However, in general, darker-green oil tends to be fruitier and grassy, while brighter, yellow-green oils are spicier and more peppery.

    Taste
    Take a sip of the oil and allow it to coat your mouth before you swallow. It should taste like olives and can also have hints of apples, herbs, grass, and pepper. Anything tangy or metallic-tasting means that the oil could be rancid. Rancid oil is a result of overexposure to light, heat, and oxygen.

    Texture
    Good oils should feel silky or creamy in your mouth. They should make their presence known by filling your senses with their aromas, but they should never coat or block your palate. Bottom line: If your mouth feels or tastes greasy afterwards, then the oil is bad.

    Storage
    While olive oil bottles look nice displayed on the kitchen counter, the oil is affected by direct exposure to sunlight and heat. Try to keep your oil in a cool, dark place and preferably in a darker bottle. If stored correctly, your oil should keep for several years.

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    Are you confused by the shelves upon shelves of olive oils staring back at you in the supermarket? The myriad brands and grades are overwhelming, and the range in prices makes things even more confusing. Which one should you buy? Stress no more! We’ve got your back. Read... 
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    Comparing Italian and Tunisian olive oils

    Edmund Mach Foundation finds all the imported Tunisian olive oils were found to be of poor quality. IRMS and H-NMR are powerful techniques for verifying claims of origin.

    Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS), 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR), conventional chemical analysis and chemometric elaboration were used to assess quality and to define and confirm the geographical origin of 177 Italian PDO (Protected Denomination of Origin) olive oils and 86 samples imported from Tunisia.

    Italian olive oils were richer in squalene and unsaturated fatty acids, whereas Tunisian oils showed higher δ18O, δ2H, linoleic acid, β -sitosterol, sn-1 and 3 diglyceride values.

    Furthermore, all the Tunisian samples imported were of poor quality, with a K232 and /or acidity values above the limits established for extra virgin olive oils.

    By combining isotopic composition with 1H-NMR data using a multivariate statistical approach, a statistical model able to discriminate olive oil from Italy and oil imported from Tunisia was obtained, with an optimal differentiation ability arriving at around 98%.

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    Edmund Mach Foundation finds all the imported Tunisian olive oils were found to be of poor quality. IRMS and H-NMR are powerful techniques for verifying claims of origin. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS), 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR), conventional chemical analysis... 
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  • Extra virgin olive oil classified by electronic tongue

    Extra virgin olive oil fruitiness, bitterness and pungency sensations evaluated by a sensory panel and then by electronic tongue. This instrument allows differentiating olive oils with different sensory intensities, and could be used as a preliminary, complementary and practical tool for panelists during olive oil sensory analysis

    Olive oils may be commercialized as intense, medium or light, according to the intensity perception of fruitiness, bitterness and pungency attributes, assessed by a sensory panel.

    In this work, the capability of an electronic tongue to correctly classify olive oils according to the sensory intensity perception levels was evaluated.

    Cross-sensitivity and non-specific lipid polymeric membranes were used as sensors. The sensor device was firstly tested using quinine monohydrochloride standard solutions.

    Mean sensitivities of 14±2 to 25±6 mV/decade, depending on the type of plasticizer used in the lipid membranes, were obtained showing the device capability for evaluating bitterness.

    Then, linear discriminant models based on sub-sets of sensors, selected by a meta-heuristic simulated annealing algorithm, were established enabling to correctly classify 91% of olive oils according to their intensity sensory grade (leave-one-out cross-validation procedure).

    This capability was further evaluated using a repeated K-fold cross-validation procedure, showing that the electronic tongue allowed an average correct classification of 80% of the olive oils used for internal-validation.

    So, the electronic tongue can be seen as a taste sensor, allowing differentiating olive oils with different sensory intensities, and could be used as a preliminary, complementary and practical tool for panelists during olive oil sensory analysis.

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    Extra virgin olive oil fruitiness, bitterness and pungency sensations evaluated by a sensory panel and then by electronic tongue. This instrument allows differentiating olive oils with different sensory intensities, and could be used as a preliminary, complementary and practical... 
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  • Olive oil fraud

    Cyprus Health Services conducting regular market product testings found that the 4litre bottle of Macheras Virgin Olive Oil (bottling date: 05/2015) does not comply with approved standards for virgin olive oil or any other type of olive oil.

    In fact, tested samples were found to contain a variety of vegetable oil. The samples were tested at the State General Laboratory.

    Health Services will be doing hygiene checks at the company’s bottling facilities as they suspect fraud, and that the company was intentionally passing off adulterated oil as Extra Virgin.

    The product has been withdrawn from the market. The Health Ministry advises customers who have already bought the product not to consume it and return it to the place of purchase.

    Macheras olive oil was found not to comply with approved standards once before, in 2011, when tests showed that it contained certain hydro-carbonates unfit for human consumption.

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    Cyprus Health Services conducting regular market product testings found that the 4litre bottle of Macheras Virgin Olive Oil (bottling date: 05/2015) does not comply with approved standards for virgin olive oil or any other type of olive oil. In fact, tested samples were found... 
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  • Involvement of an enzyme in the brown color of green table olives

    Researchers of the Chemistry and Pigments Biochemistry Group and Natural Antimicrobial Group, both from the Special Institute of Fats and Fat Derivative (CSIC), have demonstrated the involvement of an enzyme in the brown color of green table olives in brine.

    This coloring makes them less attractive, so disabling these molecules can prevent the formation of unwanted colors on the product to make it more palatable to the consumer, said today Fundación Descubre in a statement.

    These experts have stressed that color is one of the main parameters of quality in table olives. Specifically, the pigments responsible for the coloration are chlorophylls and carotenoids when the olive is green or yellowish green.

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    Researchers of the Chemistry and Pigments Biochemistry Group and Natural Antimicrobial Group, both from the Special Institute of Fats and Fat Derivative (CSIC), have demonstrated the involvement of an enzyme in the brown color of green table olives in brine. This coloring makes... 
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  • 6° Edition Olive Oil Sommelier Tuscan Food & Wine Experience

    An intense and exciting experience in the olive oil field for food lovers, gourmets, food enthusiasts and professionals who want a deeper knowledge of the whole production and commercial process of olive oil – “from the earth to the table”, with “hands-on” in the heart of Tuscany, between olive groves and oil mills in production, with oil tasting from around the world, but also of the new Tuscan oil product just in front of you.img02_2

    Not just a course but a memorable experience with well balanced theory and practical segments that provide participants with the right skills and knowledge to be able to recognize, use and communicate the rational use of olive oil in the kitchen and on the table through the harmonization of olive oil and food pairing.olive-oil-sommelier-tuscan

    This knowledge will help turn costs into profits for retail, restaurants and also consumers.img09_1

    Other opportunities open to course participants is to become an olive oil expert and taster, to be part of an official tasting panel or to be part of jury in various international olive oil competitions.6 edition-olive-oil-sommelier-tuscan-food-wine-experience

    At course completion, participants will have acquired skills and certification (Sensory Aptitude Certificate) entitling them to join the International Register of “Olive Oil Experts”.

    A course created and organized by the Olive Oil Academy.

    6° Edition OLIVE OIL SOMMELIER COURSE
    A Master on EVOO for Olive Oil Lovers & Experts
    26th – 30th october 2015
    Bagno Vignoni – Val d’Orcia (Siena) – Tuscany – Italy

    Download brief presentation and application form

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    An intense and exciting experience in the olive oil field for food lovers, gourmets, food enthusiasts and professionals who want a deeper knowledge of the whole production and commercial process of olive oil – “from the earth to the table”, with “hands-on” in the heart... 
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  • Olive oil tourism in California is growing

    The state produces 99 percent of the extra-virgin olive oil in the United States and 4 percent globally, according to the California Olive Oil Council, a trade association. Many artisan labels are within a few hours’ drive of San Francisco and have recently opened their estates to the public.

    The founders of the six-year-old brand Grove 45 in Napa Valley, Nena Talcott and Bonnie Storm, started private tours this year that they lead together. Guests stroll the groves, learn about the different olive trees and taste the oil in dishes at lunch. (Tours, offered through October, are $200 for two and arranged by emailing info@grove45.com.) Also in Napa Valley, Round Pond Estate has small group tours of its orchards and olive mill. Sampling the nine kinds of oils it makes with foods like homegrown vegetables and learning how to use them at home are highlights of the 90-minute excursion. The cost is $65 a person.

    Seka Hills in the Capay Valley, two hours northeast of San Francisco and run by the Indian tribe Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation, has three oil varieties and shows guests how they are made. The tours include an oil sampling, a visit to the mill where the olives are pressed and bottled, and a stroll through the 82-acre orchards. (Tours are free and arranged through the company’s website.)

    Seeing the orchards and olive mill are part of the two-hour group tours at the family-run McEvoy Ranch in Petaluma, but guests also learn the techniques used to grow trees for the oil the company makes. (Tours are $35, by appointment, and can be arranged through the McEvoy website.) The hilltop Trattore Farms in Geysersville, in Sonoma County, has a 90-minute “Get Your Boots Dirty” group tour: Visitors learn how the 1,500 olive trees are sustainably grown, attend a session on making oils and can try the dozen oils the company produces (including one flavored with Persian lime). The cost is $40 a person.

    The tours are worth adding to a travel itinerary, says Curtis Cord, publisher of the online Olive Oil Times. “The smaller producers in California are creating beautiful oils in exceptionally picturesque settings so you get double appreciation from every one you visit,” he said.

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    The state produces 99 percent of the extra-virgin olive oil in the United States and 4 percent globally, according to the California Olive Oil Council, a trade association. Many artisan labels are within a few hours’ drive of San Francisco and have recently opened their estates... 
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  • San Diego Archaeological Center announces Ancient Indulgences: Olive Oil

    Ancient Indulgences: Olive Oil, the second of a series of events about the history of life’s little pleasures on Saturday, September 26, 2015, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

    The event will be held at the San Diego Archaeological Center located at 16666 San Pasqual Valley Road, Escondido, CA 92027.

    The domestication of olives in the Mediterranean region occurred approximately 8,000 years ago. The oil from the olive was one of several characteristics that made the fruit attractive enough to result in its domestication. Yet, it was the deliberate pressing of oil out of olives that was revolutionary and led to significant cultural and socio-economic changes throughout the region.

    Olive oil became an important source of fuel but also had uses in healing, cooking, and was an essential component in ritual practice. Many of these uses are still around today making olive oil one of the most important staples of the modern household.

    Adolfo Muniz, PhD will present a lecture on the archaeological evidence of olive oil domestication. After the lecture, mingle with others while enjoying red and white Southern California wines provided by Halter Ranch Vineyard and olive oil and delicious breads from Whole Foods Encinitas.

    You can also enter a silent auction for a chance to win amazing olive oils and tickets to the San Diego Museum of Man and San Diego Children’s Discovery Museum.

    Admission: 21 and over only
    $20 for members
    $25 for non-members

    Space is limited and you must register in advance. Spots are filling up, so book your ticket now!

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    Ancient Indulgences: Olive Oil, the second of a series of events about the history of life’s little pleasures on Saturday, September 26, 2015, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The event will be held at the San Diego Archaeological Center located at 16666 San Pasqual Valley Road, Escondido,... 
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  • Slovenian olive oil is only now being recognized internationally for its excellence

    Olive growing in Slovenia’s Littoral (Primorska) region has a long history. However, after years of neglect, Slovenian olive oil is only now being recognized internationally for its excellence.

    Even in Roman times, olive growing was widespread in what is now southwestern Slovenia. Olive oil was one of the most important traditional products of the area, and by the 19th century, almost every village in Slovenian Istria had an olive press. In the 20th century, however, various factors led to a decline in olive oil production. Industrialization resulted in a decline in rural population, and a series of frosts substantially reduced the number of olive trees.

    After World War II, the Communist authorities did establish several olive-growing cooperatives, but the production of olive oil was never considered a priority. The production of sunflower oil was considered more important, and Slovenian olive oil became a rare commodity.

    As late as in 2006, an otherwise comprehensive Dorling-Kindersley guide to olive oil essentially ignored Slovenian oil, merely noting that Slovenian supermarkets were full of imported varieties. The book was right; for years, Slovenian shoppers could choose between Spanish, Italian, and Greek olive oil, but Slovenian oil was difficult to obtain.

    But even as the book hit the shelves, change was underway among Slovenia’s olive groves. An increasing realization of the quality of Slovenian oil has led many producers to begin marketing small quantities of top-notch olive oil. The results soon began to pay off. Slovenian olive growers soon started to receive awards at international olive oil exhibitions, such as the prestigious SOL fair in Verona, Italy. Since Slovenia’s olive groves are among the most northerly in Europe, the country olive oil is known for its strong taste, which soon became highly prized among connoisseurs.

    In the wake of the enthusiastic international reception, Slovenian olive growers began to increase the production of oil. The growth was also encouraged by changing trends in Slovenian cooking, with a renewed popularity of Mediterranean dishes and products from the Slovenian countryside. In recent years, new olive groves have even begun to appear in the northerly Goriška Brda region, where they were previously exceedingly rare.

    Slovenian olive oil is still less common than imported varieties, and because it’s produced in limited quantities, it often carries a higher price tag. However, it’s very poplar among many Slovenian consumers, who prize it not just for its quality but are also determined to support a product that has shaped the culture and the history of southwestern Sloveni

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    Olive growing in Slovenia’s Littoral (Primorska) region has a long history. However, after years of neglect, Slovenian olive oil is only now being recognized internationally for its excellence. Even in Roman times, olive growing was widespread in what is now southwestern Slovenia.... 
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  • Synthesis of aroma compounds of virgin olive oil occurs through the lipoxygenase

    Increasing the hydroperoxide lyase activity causes an increased synthesis of volatile compounds. The activity is rapidly inactivated during olive fruit milling.

    Synthesis of the aroma compounds of virgin olive oil (VOO) occurs through the lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway comprising mainly the actuation of LOX and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) enzymes. It’s important to determine whether the cleavage of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides catalyzed by HPL is a limiting factor for the biosynthesis of VOO volatile compounds during the oil extraction process.

    For this purpose, HPL activity and the availability of substrates for this activity were modified during the oil extraction process from olive fruits of cultivars Arbequina and Picual, which give rise to oils with quantitatively different volatile profiles. Experimental data suggest that the HPL enzyme activity is just slightly limited during the oil extraction process in both cultivars, being this limitation apparently more significant during the processing of Arbequina fruits than of Picual fruits.

    However, this difference in HPL limitation seems to be more related to the differences in the amount of hydroperoxides produced in each cultivar than to the level of HPL activity during the olive processing.

    Bibliografy
    Araceli Sánchez-Ortiz, Ana G. Pérez, Carlos Sanz, Synthesis of aroma compounds of virgin olive oil:
    Significance of the cleavage of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides during the oil extraction process, Food Research International, Volume 54, Issue 2, December 2013, Pages 1972-1978, ISSN 0963-9969

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    Increasing the hydroperoxide lyase activity causes an increased synthesis of volatile compounds. The activity is rapidly inactivated during olive fruit milling. Synthesis of the aroma compounds of virgin olive oil (VOO) occurs through the lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway comprising... 
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  • Study on the degree of knowledge and habits on olive oils among Spanish consumers

    The study “Trends in taste” developed by Consumolab (center inside Ainia specialized in the study of behavior and consumer preferences) shows that most valued foods are the less bitter (68% respondents). A preference that plays against EVOO, especially if we consider that 97.3% of respondents say that they are guided by taste when buying a product.

    The report data are based on an online survey done to consumers of the Consumolab panel, made up of people of both sexes aged between 18 and 60 years who have been segmented by age and gender. All of them have been asked for their preferences for sweet, salty, sour and bitter tastes.

    Thus, according to the report, sweet and salty flavors are the favorite of consumers. Specifically, 55% of Millennials (young adults between 20 and 35 years) choose sweet tastes as well as 47.5% of respondents belonging to Generation X (born between the early 60s and 80s). By gender, women are also more partisan of sweetness (51.2%). Finally, Baby Boomers (people born between the 40s and 60s) and men don’t like sweetness, but don’t choose bitter either, they prefer salty (50%).

    As for the preferences in acid and bitter tastes, both increase with age and are more liked by men than women (2.8% and 0.6%, respectively).

    Data were based on 383 surveys accomplished in the linear of the most important supermarkets in Madrid and Córdoba: Carrefour, Hipercor, Lidl and Mercadona.

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    The study “Trends in taste” developed by Consumolab (center inside Ainia specialized in the study of behavior and consumer preferences) shows that most valued foods are the less bitter (68% respondents). A preference that plays against EVOO, especially if we consider... 
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  • Patented a formula that ensures the age of olive trees

    José Luis Penetra Cerveira LousadaPortuguese researcher José Luis Penetra Cerveira Lousada (or the “tree datador”, as he likes to be called), who works at the University of Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro (Vila Real, Portugal), has patented, along with his team, a formula that ensures the age of olive trees and ancient chestnut. Mercacei has interviewed him to get to know his job in detail.

    What does your method on dating olive trees have in particular?
    One of the most prominent features of many trees, especially those from regions with very specific cyclic environmental alterations (temperature, precipitation, photoperiod…), is that its wood is formed by concentric rings corresponding to successive annual increases in their growth. If its trunk is sectioned transversely, these rings appear presenting a succession of bright and dark spots depending on their anatomical structure. The first rings correspond to wood formed during the first stage of the growing season (spring), while the darker areas correspond to the wood produced in the final phase of this period (summer/fall). In this sense, evaluating the age of a tree is relatively easy, since all you have to do is count the number of rings present in a cross section of a trunk taken as close as possible to the base area.

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    Portuguese researcher José Luis Penetra Cerveira Lousada (or the “tree datador”, as he likes to be called), who works at the University of Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro (Vila Real, Portugal), has patented, along with his team, a formula that ensures the age of olive... 
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  • Amazing olive oil packaging for Gino’s Garden created by Marios Karystios

    Once a year, Gino Haddad picks a small quantity of olives from his groves in the Rihaneh region of Lebanon. Each batch goes from field to cold-press within six hours of selection; ensuring its status amongst the highest quality oil’s available.

    Oil is produced annually in limited quantity.

    Marios Karystios olive packaging Gino’s Garden’ designboom the handmade packaging is meant to reflect the special quality of ‘Gino’s Garden’ olive oil.

    To reflect Gino’s unique approach, designer Marios Karystios created specific packaging to carry the product. ‘Gino’s Garden’ bottles are ceramic pieces produced in two uneven olive shapes.

    Karystios, with help from Christina Laouri, used mathematical calculations to make the forms not only manufacturable by hand; but perfect for carrying Gino’s olive oil.

    Both designs are produced in Greece by ceramist Stelios Laskaris.

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    details of olive oil pouring3_resize

    the two shapes were optimized using several mathematical calculations6_resize

    detail of tag and cork top1_resize

    the bottles were designed by Marios Karystios4_resize
    source

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    Once a year, Gino Haddad picks a small quantity of olives from his groves in the Rihaneh region of Lebanon. Each batch goes from field to cold-press within six hours of selection; ensuring its status amongst the highest quality oil’s available. Oil is produced annually in limited... 
    Read More →
  • Master Milling Certificate Course from UC Davis Olive Center in October

    The best olive milling course in the US will held in October 1-4, led by international expert Leandro Ravetti, is running out of space — sign up now and save!

    UC Davis Olive Center

    The four-day course will be held at the Robert Mondavi Institute on the UC Davis Campus.
    This year’s program, with its home base set at the Silverado Vineyard Sensory Theater, will be led by Leandro Ravetti, one of the world’s leading experts in olive oil from harvest to processing.

    An agricultural engineer hailing from Argentina, Ravetti worked for many years with the National Institute of Agricultural Technology in olive production research, serving as advisor to several of the country’s largest olive growers and olive oil producers. In 2001, he made the cross-continental leap to Australia where he currently leads a “Modern Olives” technical team, consulting and providing guidance to that country’s major growers and processors, and helping to facilitate the planting of 3.5 million trees.

    Since 2005, Ravetti has served as executive director of Boundary Bend Ltd., Australia’s leading, fully integrated olive company, helping to spearhead the company’s rapid growth, high efficiency, and a collection of oils that continue to garner top awards at international competitions and tastings. Under Ravetti’s leadership, through his focus on innovation, data, and analysis, the company continues to maximize production efficiency without sacrificing quality.

    The course will include a field trip to five olive oil processors in Yolo County, including to Boundary Bend’s new U.S. facility in nearby Woodland.

    Register Online: UC Master Milling Certificate Course

    UC Davis Olive Center
    Robert Mondavi Institute, Sensory Building
    392 Old Davis Road
    Davis, CA 95616

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    The best olive milling course in the US will held in October 1-4, led by international expert Leandro Ravetti, is running out of space — sign up now and save!The four-day course will be held at the Robert Mondavi Institute on the UC Davis Campus. This year’s program,... 
    Read More →