Monthly Archives: July 2016

  • The Ambassador of Tunisia receives members of the IOC Executive Secretariat

    On Wednesday 20 July 2016, H.E. Wacef Chiha, the Tunisian Ambassador in Madrid, received members of the Executive Secretariat of the International Olive Council on their return from the 27th extraordinary session of the Council of Members of the Organisation.

    The Executive Director of the IOC, Mr Abdellatif Guedira, himself a Tunisian national, took the opportunity to present to the Ambassador the conclusions of the session that had been organised by the Tunisian authorities with the collaboration of the Tunisian National Office for Olive Oil (ONH) in the city of Hammamet from 11 to 16 July.

    He also thanked the Government of Tunisia, on behalf of the Executive Secretariat staff and the Council of Members, for the warm welcome given to the Council and for the excellent organisation of the meetings and side-events put on for the Member delegates.

    He also used the visit to introduce to the Ambassador the two new IOC Deputy Directors, who entered into office on 1 July, Jaime Lillo from Spain and Mustapha Sepetçi from Turkey, each responsible in their respective capacities for technical, economic and promotional matters and administrative and financial matters.

    The four Heads of Unit and the Head of the Legal Department, who accompanied the IOC Directors, presented the results of the Committees and working groups that had met during the session.

    http://www.internationaloliveoil.org/news/view/686-year-2016-news/727-the-ambassador-of-tunisia-receives-members-of-the-ioc-executive-secretariat

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    On Wednesday 20 July 2016, H.E. Wacef Chiha, the Tunisian Ambassador in Madrid, received members of the Executive Secretariat of the International Olive Council on their return from the 27th extraordinary session of the Council of Members of the Organisation. The Executive Director... 
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  • State of progress of the IOC project to increase the economic yield of the genetic olive resources

    In the framework of its programme of activities for the first semester of 2016, at a project mid-term evaluation meeting with the Common Fund for Commodities (CFC), the project implementing agency (Tunisian Olive Tree Institute) and the collaborating centres (the National Institute of Agricultural Research of Morocco (INRA), the Technical Institute for Fruit Tree and Vine Growing of Algeria (ITAF), the Horticulture Research Institute of Egypt and the National Office for Olive Oil of Tunisia), the IOC assessed the state of progress of its project to create pilot nurseries.

    The main project objectives
    1. Give farmers greater access to native olive genotypes adapted to specific environmental conditions.
    2. Make farmers aware that healthy, authentic and high yielding plant material contributes to the sustainable development of the olive industry in the Mediterranean region.
    3. Increase the yield potential of olive orchards by providing top-quality plants and widening the range of choice of plant material.
    4. Increase the olive growing income of rural households.

    Expected outputs
    1. Establishment of four modern nurseries, one in each participant country, to serve as centres of excellence.
    2. Production of 25,000 olive plants/year/collaborating centre for at least 340 farmers/year.
    3. Supply of top-quality plants compliant with phytosanitary rules and of a broader choice of varieties.
    4. Provide technical assistance and training for nurseries, farmers and outreach officers.

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    In the framework of its programme of activities for the first semester of 2016, at a project mid-term evaluation meeting with the Common Fund for Commodities (CFC), the project implementing agency (Tunisian Olive Tree Institute) and the collaborating centres (the National Institute... 
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  • 5 Olives a Day Keeps the Doctor Away?

    When it comes to illness, pharmaceuticals may have their place, but when speaking of prevention of illness – or better yet long-life vitality – well, Nature has her own pharmacopoeia. Berries, spices, herbs, fruits and vegetables are the medicines that Hippocrates prescribed over two thousand years ago. A body well supported in daily nutrition, proper rest and adequate exercise has a natural defence against many of the modern illnesses this culture seems to think of as inevitable. Thank goodness researchers are getting turned on about finding out what Nature has so abundantly provided – bioavailable functional foods. So here is another little treasure – often overlooked in the appetiser dish.

    The first cause of death worldwide is cardiovascular disease and mostly coronary artery diseases, mainly affected by cholesterol. The daily consumption of high phenolic EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) is widely known and proven to help prevent those diseases and reduce their symptoms. Phenolic compounds in EVOO have health protective benefits with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, cardio-protective and neuroprotective action. But could the consumption of olives also affect the development and progression of heart diseases? Can olives keep the heart healthy just like high phenolic extra virgin olive oil?

    The answer may surprise you.

    At the recently concluded OIS (Oleocanthal International Society) conference which took place at the ancient city of Olympia on June 2-3, Dr. Martha Spyridoula-Katsarou, post-doc researcher at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, presented the latest research on the health benefits of olives. Spyridoula-Katsarou explained how olive consumption could affect cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart diseases. The phenolic analysis of olives was conducted by Dr. Magiatis using the NMR method (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) along with a team of researchers led by Dr. Melliou; Vlahakou, Liaskonis, Kalogridis, Demertzis and Drakoulis

    First here is what you need to know about cholesterol:

    “Bad” cholesterol (LDL) sticks to the artery walls and contributes to plaque build up.“Good” cholesterol (HDL) is stable and carries away “bad” cholesterol (LDL) away from the arteries.

    The 60 day study was composed of 20 healthy subjects aged 22-65 not currently on any medication.

    After testing 30 types of Greek organic olives, for this study they selected the Kalamata type olives produced by the Sakellaropoulos Family because they were found to contain 5 times higher concentration of hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol than the other commercially available varieties. The organic olives selected for this study contained 1300mg per kg of hydroxytyrosol and 560mg per kg of tyrosol. Daily consumption of only 5 of these olives provides 25mg of hydroxytyrosol and 10 mg of tyrosol. This is significant because, just like EVOO, not all olives are created the same. The key to health benefits of olives and EVOO is the type and amount of phenolic compounds they contain.

    Sakellaropoulos Estates is a small family run business with strong traditional values and organic farming methods. The main producer is George Sakellaropoulos, whose aim and dedication has been the harvesting and production of olive oil and olives that offer high beneficial health qualities. The olives, which come exclusively from their own olive groves are rigorously selected and handpicked. They are not pasteurized but naturally fermented for over a 9 month period with no use of chemicals and pesticides. There are 10 different types, each combined with various fruits and herbs of the local area.

    With the help of his son, Nick, who is a chemical engineer, they have managed to produce the Kalamata type olives which were used for the study as explained by Dr. Martha – Spyridoula Katsarou at the Oleocanthal International Society.

    Nick, when asked how he felt about being a part of this ground breaking study said, “We are very proud and honored to be a part of this study and for the achievement of our efforts to produce functional foods. My family’s main objective over the last 20 years, has been in retaining and improving the high phenolic compounds of the olive oil and olives we produce, with much work and dedication, and the emphasis being on the health benefits and not the mass production.” The proof is in the olives themselves.
    Sakellaropoulos Estates Peloponnese Greece

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    When it comes to illness, pharmaceuticals may have their place, but when speaking of prevention of illness – or better yet long-life vitality – well, Nature has her own pharmacopoeia. Berries, spices, herbs, fruits and vegetables are the medicines that Hippocrates prescribed... 
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  • Virgin olive oil helps in preventing and treating hypertension

    Oleic acid plus a constellation of minor constituents as a natural antihypertensive.

    Consumption of virgin olive oil is good for you, but why? Scientific evidence on this issue has been accumulating for a quarter century. Epidemiological, clinical, and animal studies support that the consumption of virgin olive oil, instead of other sources of dietary fats, has antihypertensive effects.

    What contains does virgin olive oil contain that makes it so healthy? Virgin olive oil is an oily fruit whose composition includes large quantities of oleic acid (a monounsaturated fatty acid) and also a variety of compounds present in lower quantities, named minor constituents, such as hydrocarbons, phytosterols, triterpenic compounds, and phenolic compounds. Both oleic acid and these minor constituents confer unique bioactive properties to virgin olive oil.

    How do its components protect from hypertension? They influence on factors associated with the pathophysiology of hypertension such as vascular contractibility and protect from heart and kidney cellular loss and functionality, leading to a reduction of blood pressure.

    Is it a miraculous ingredient? No, it is just a food. Virgin olive oil helps in preventing and treating hypertension but its full power arises as part of the Mediterranean diet in a global strategy for a healthy and long-lasting life.

    Source

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    Oleic acid plus a constellation of minor constituents as a natural antihypertensive. Consumption of virgin olive oil is good for you, but why? Scientific evidence on this issue has been accumulating for a quarter century. Epidemiological, clinical, and animal studies support... 
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  • Mycobacteria Treatment for Bladder Cancer More Effective With Emulsification in Olive Oil

    Emulsifying Mycobacterium brumae in olive oil appeared promising for producing a robust immune response in preclinical tests. Recent research has indicated that M brumae is a safer alternative to M bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), an effective treatment routinely used for high-risk non-muscle–invasive bladder cancer and carcinoma in situ.1

    Currently, approximately 5% of patients treated with BCG develop serious side effects, including BCG infection. In contrast, no cases of infection with M brumae were described in humans or animals.

    The challenge with M brumae is that mycobacteria cells, which have a high lipid content in their cell walls, tend to clump when placed in the water-based solutions used for intravesical instillation in patients with bladder cancer. This clumping may interfere with the interaction of the mycobacteria-host cells and negatively influence their antitumor effects.

    Dispersing the M brumae in olive oil led to favorable conditions for reaching the bladder epithelium in vivo. Specifically, the emulsion of M brumae in olive oil was less hydrophobic, had a lower pH, more neutralized zeta potential, and an increased affinity for fibronectin than nonemulsified M brumae. Mice treated with the olive oil-suspended M brumae had a significantly higher systemic immune response.

    “These results highlight the potential of the olive oil-based emulsion as a promising delivery vehicle for the mycobacterial treatment of bladder cancer,” said Esther Julián, a professor in the Department of Genetics and Microbiology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain, and senior author of the study.

    Reference

    1. Noguera-Ortega E, Blanco-Cabra N, Rabanal RM, et al. Mycobacteria emulsified in olive oil-in-water trigger a robust immune response in bladder cancer treatment. Scientific Reports. 2016 Jun 6. doi:10.1038/srep27232. [Epub ahead of print]

    Source: oncologynurseadvisor.com

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    Emulsifying Mycobacterium brumae in olive oil appeared promising for producing a robust immune response in preclinical tests. Recent research has indicated that M brumae is a safer alternative to M bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), an effective treatment routinely used for... 
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  • PRIZE WINNERS AND FINALISTS - IOC MARIO SOLINAS QUALITY AWARD

    The second edition of the International Olive Council’s Mario Solinas Quality Award 2016 has recognized EVOOs from Spain, Italy and Portugal. This edition drew 47 entries from Argentina (3), Australia (1), Chile (3), Greece (1), Israel (1), Italy (2), Peru (1), Portugal (16), Spain (17), Tunisia (1) and Uruguay (1).

    Individual producers, producers’ associations or packers in any producer country could enter extra virgin olive oils for the competition.

    All the competitors can now break the seal of the tank holding the batch of oil they entered for the competition.

    The winners are allowed to announce the prize on the labels of the extra virgin olive oil belonging to the same batch as the winning sample and can obtain a special logo from the Executive Secretariat for this purpose.

    The prize-giving ceremony will be held at the Madrid headquarters of the IOC on a date yet to be determined.

    Prize Winners

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    The second edition of the International Olive Council’s Mario Solinas Quality Award 2016 has recognized EVOOs from Spain, Italy and Portugal. This edition drew 47 entries from Argentina (3), Australia (1), Chile (3), Greece (1), Israel (1), Italy (2), Peru (1), Portugal (16),... 
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  • Tunisia is the second country, after Spain, with the highest olive area

    Tunisia, as a founding member of the IOC from its creation in February 1956, has participated actively in the successive international Agreements on olive oil and table olives and has contributed to all the working groups set up to monitor research and development and olive oil chemistry activities over the last 60 years. As one of the signatories of the first International Olive Oil Agreement in 1959, together with Belgium, France, Greece, Israel, Italy, Libya, Morocco, Portugal, Spain and the United Kingdom, Tunisia has the second largest olive-growing area in the world after Spain.

    Fifty years ago, Tunisia was using 800 000 ha of land for olive growing, which accounted for 16 pc of the world olive acreage. More than 99 pc of the production from Tunisian olive orchards is used for oil extraction, while the remainder is used for table olive processing. The country has more than 800 million olive trees, of which 35 pc are less than 5 years old; 54 pc are between 20 and 70 years old and 15 pc were planted over 70 years ago. Only 5 pc of the olive-growing area is cultivated under irrigation.

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    Tunisia, as a founding member of the IOC from its creation in February 1956, has participated actively in the successive international Agreements on olive oil and table olives and has contributed to all the working groups set up to monitor research and development and olive oil... 
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  • New Disease Reported in California Olive Orchards - Olive Oil Commission

    During a recent meeting of the Olive Oil Commission of California, several board members reported evidence of a new disease that appears to be affecting California olive trees. Posted here are pictures by University of California Plant Pathologist Florent Trouillas which illustrate symptoms in twigs and leaves from infected orchards that may help you determine if this problem occurs in your olive orchards.

    Neofabraea-Leaf-Spot-on-Arbosana-705x391Defoliation on Arbosana cultivarNeofabraea Leaf Spot on Arbosana Neoafabraea twig lesions at wounds caused by mechanical harvester on Arbosana Neofabraea twig lesions on Arbosana[1]

    According to Trouillas, the putative pathogen, known as Neofabraea, was initially reported in Coratina and Picholine cultivars in two commercial orchards in Sonoma County in 2013. OOCC Board members report it is being found in some orchards located in the Sacramento Delta growing areas on Arbosana and, possibly, Arbequina varieties and may be more prevalent in humid growing areas. It is apparently related to the “bulls-eye rot” pathogen in apples and pears. Symptoms in olive include defoliation, leaf spots, twig die-back and twig lesions.

    The OOCC Research Committee will be looking at this problem and may consider funding of research to investigate the pathogen identity and biology, as well as control strategies for this new disease. In the meantime, please take a look at the photos included here to help determine if this disease is present in your orchard. If you believe you see evidence of this new disease, please contact your county farm advisor.

    source: oliveoilcommission.org

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    During a recent meeting of the Olive Oil Commission of California, several board members reported evidence of a new disease that appears to be affecting California olive trees. Posted here are pictures by University of California Plant Pathologist Florent Trouillas which illustrate... 
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  • List of demarcated areas in the EU territory for the presence of Xylella fastidiosa

    Pursuant to Article 4(4) of Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2015/789, the following demarcated areas are established by the Member States concerned for the presence of Xylella fastidiosa as referred to in Article 4(1) of that Decision (EU) 2015/789.

    As a result of the detection of new outbreaks of the Xylella fastidiosa bacterium in France and Italy, the European Commission has updated the list of demarcated areas in order to disseminate this information to other Member States.

    The demarcated area consists of the infected zone and a 10 km buffer zone as specified in Article 4(2) of Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2015/789.

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    Pursuant to Article 4(4) of Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2015/789, the following demarcated areas are established by the Member States concerned for the presence of Xylella fastidiosa as referred to in Article 4(1) of that Decision (EU) 2015/789. As a result of the detection... 
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