Daily Archives: April 8, 2016

  • Olive Press's 'Mission' oil earned Best of California & Best of Class awards at the state fair

    According to the California State Fair press release, California extra virgin olive oil is one of the state’s fastest-growing agricultural industries. Consumers appear to be starting to turn to local olive oils after huge publicity about olive oil adulterations and cheating in Europe, where producers allegedly added other oils and coloring to feign extra virgins.

    We do know that olives are Sonoma Valley’s second-largest agricultural crop after grapes.

    And Sonoma Valley’s own Olive Press just cleaned up on medals at the California State Fair, San Joaquin Valley Olive Oil Competition and at the Los Angeles International Olive Oil Competition.

    The California State Fair’s just-released Olive Oil Competition awards include a multitude of medals for Fred and Nancy Kline’s Olive Press, including top Best of California Extra Virgin Olive Oil for its Mission line in the Single Variety Delicate category, and Best of Class for extra virgin olive oil, again for Mission. They also received several gold and silver medals for their Manzanillo, Sevillano, Arbosana, Arbequina, Picual, and Italian blend extra virgin olive oils. The Olive Press’s Lemonato, Clementine and lime flavored olive oils gained silver and bronze medals.

    McEvoy Ranch won gold for its certified organic estate Robust Blend EVOO.

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    According to the California State Fair press release, California extra virgin olive oil is one of the state’s fastest-growing agricultural industries. Consumers appear to be starting to turn to local olive oils after huge publicity about olive oil adulterations and cheating... 
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  • Talking with Eataly NYC olive oil expert

    If you live in Tuscany, chances are you’ve been called on by friends to help with their olive harvest or you have olive trees yourself. If you’re here for a visit, you are most likely enjoying flavorful Tuscan extra-virgin olive oil where it is grown and pressed. But what about our friends back in the United States? How can they enjoy the true flavors and be sure that they are getting authentic Tuscan oil? We talked to Nicholas Coleman, olive oil buyer for Eataly, about his profession and his passion.

    Meet Nicholas Coleman, olive oil buyer for Eataly

    Oonagh Stransky: Tell me about your relationship with Arezzo and the surrounding countryside.

    Nicholas Coleman: In 2007 I embarked on a journey from the Arctic Circle in Finland down to the Sahara Desert in Morocco. It was my quest for truth, understanding and adventure, of the sort many people undertake in their early twenties. I happened to be in Italy during the olive harvest and was put in contact with Nadia Gasperini Rossi, from the ancient city of Arezzo. She took me under her wing, showed me how to hand-harvest, hand-clean and coddle olives from tree to mill in mint condition.

    OS: What was the most difficult aspect of your training with the Italian Olive Oil Tasters Organization?

    NC: I had spent years tasting hundreds of oils from around the world, so I had a pretty clear sense of identifying regional olive cultivars based on their smell, flavor and texture. Two weeks before the course, I abstained from alcohol, coffee, dairy and meat. I basically maintained a vegan diet. This process effectively neutralized my palate so I could sense the subtle nuances in oil.

    OS: What is your role at Eataly in NYC?

    NC: I spend most of my time at Eataly educating the public and staff about the 100+ extra virgin olive oils we carry. It’s the finest selection of single-estate mono-cultivar Italian oils in America. I also teach the master class at Lidia Bastianich’s culinary school, highlighting the unique organoleptic properties of oils from throughout Italy.

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    Rating: 3.4/10 (256 votes cast)
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    Rating: -6 (from 78 votes)
    If you live in Tuscany, chances are you’ve been called on by friends to help with their olive harvest or you have olive trees yourself. If you’re here for a visit, you are most likely enjoying flavorful Tuscan extra-virgin olive oil where it is grown and pressed. But what... 
    Read More →