Daily Archives: February 1, 2016

  • Olive Oil Sommelier Course Welcomes You at Desenzano, Italy!

    The 8° Edition Olive Oil Sommilier course was designed for food lovers, olive oil tasters, gourmets, food enthusiasts and professionals.

    The course will be held from 18th to 22 th of April on Desenzano del Garda (Lake Garda – Italy), easily accessible by air, train and road.

    The course will take place in a beautiful terrace, right on the lake’s shore with panoramic views of the lake. During the coffee break participants could take a pleasant walk along the shorefront of Lake Garda.

    A wonderfully exciting olive oil & Food experience for those who want a deeper knowledge of the production, commercial processes, tasting and innovative use in the kitchen and restaurants of olive oil “…from the earth to the table”.

    Mid-April, when the days are warming up is the best time to visit Lake Garda, with its varied landscape of beaches, mountains, ancient towns and natural hot springs.

    For this reason we have decided to hold our Olive Oil Sommilier course at Desenzano on the southern shore of the lake. So immerse yourself, learn and experience the wonders of extra virgin olive oil and indulge in the food and sights of magnificent Lake Garda.

    The course will be held in a beautiful terrace, right on the lake’s shore with panoramic views of the lake. During the coffee break you could take a pleasant walk along the shorefront of Lake Garda.

    Desenzano is easily accessible by air, train and road.

    Not just a course but a memorable experience with well balanced theory and practical segments that provide participants with the right skills and knowledge to be able to recognize, use and communicate the rational use of olive oil in the kitchen and on the table through the harmonization of olive oil and food pairing.

    This knowledge will help turn costs into profits for retail, restaurants and also consumers.

    Other opportunities open to course participants is to become an olive oil expert and taster, to be part of an official tasting panel or to be part of jury in various international olive oil competitions

    At course completion, participants will have acquired skills and certification (Sensory Aptitude Certificate) entitling them to join the International Register of “Olive Oil Experts”.

    THE COURSE INCLUSIONS

    • Classroom sessions, guided tastings with more than 50 olive oils of a various origins and practical exercises from Monday to Friday
    • Five overnight stay (double room single use with lake view and private bathroom) – Check-in 17th April and Check-out 22th April 2016
    • Five breakfast buffet
    • Five light lunches buffet
    • “Food Culture & Pairing” masterclass with Artisan Cheese and Salumi
    • Two didactic dinners in local restaurants
    • Guided tour of two local wineries/olive grove/olive mill for a true culinary experience
    • Guided tasting of olive oil, wine, local artisan salumi and cheese
    • Olive Oil Sommelier Diploma
    • Sensory Aptitude Certificate
    • I.D. Olive Oil EXPERT / Sommelier Card 2016
    • Olive Oil Sommelier Apron
    • Professional Olive Oil Sommelier Pin
    • A selection the official olive oil standar defects (I.O.O.C. – EU)

    Location overview

    You will enjoy beautiful views over the countryside surrounding Lake Garda, staying in an elegant 4* 36 room hotel, in an historical home in Desenzano del Garda.

    The hotel is characterized by a large garden and an elegant swimming pool with direct access to the beach with a total view of the Lake

    The hotel has private parking, indoor and outdoor bar on the terrace with lake view and solarium.

    You will combine a stay in Desenzano del Garda in the hills overlooking the beautiful Lake Garda, you will visit to local producer of typical products (wine, cheese, olive oil, grappa) with learning to taste olive oils coming worldwide for a learning holiday with a difference.

    Suitability

    • Suitable for all levels from beginner to advanced tasters
    • Minimum age 18 (although children are accepted accompanied by adults)

    Download program and application form

    For more information, please don’t hesitate to contact Olive Oil Academy – General Secretary

    Contact person: Federica Parroni

    Ph. + 39 0521 184 1531
    Mob: +39 346 541 9847
    Fax: + 39 0521 148 0029
    info@oliveoilacademy.org
    www.oliveoilacademy.org

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.4/10 (270 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -2 (from 136 votes)
    The 8° Edition Olive Oil Sommilier course was designed for food lovers, olive oil tasters, gourmets, food enthusiasts and professionals. The course will be held from 18th to 22 th of April on Desenzano del Garda (Lake Garda – Italy), easily accessible by air, train and road. The... 
    Read More →
  • Olive oil-enriched diet reduces brain oxidative damages

    Researchers aim was to assess the influence of maternal diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids on oxidative and molecular parameters in brains of mouse pups as well as their body weight during their lifetime.

    Female rats received a diet containing 20% of olive oil (OOED) and a standard diet (CD) in different periods: pregnancy, lactation and after weaning until pups’ adulthood.

    On the last prenatal day (Group 1), embryos from OOED group showed smaller body weight, brain weight and lower levels of sulphydryl groups (GSH) in the brain.

    On postnatal day-21 (PND21) (Group 2), pups from OOED group showed higher body weight and brain weight, reduced brain weight/ body weight ratio, and lower brain lipid peroxidation (LP). On PND70 (Group 3), pups from OOED group showed lower brain LP and higher levels of GSH in prefrontal cortex, and lower brain levels of reactive species (RS) in the hippocampus.

    Interestingly, the group of animals whose diet was modified from OOED to CD on PND21 showed greater weight gain compared to the group that remained in the same original diet (OOED) until adulthood.

    Furthermore, OOED consumption during pregnancy and lactation significantly increased BDNF only, as well as its main transcripts exon IV and VI mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, OOED significantly up-regulated FGF-2 mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex.

    These findings open a pioneering line of investigation about dietary adjunctive therapeutic strategies and the potential of healthy dietary habits to prevent neonatal conditions, and their influence on adulthood.

    Source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.3/10 (243 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 88 votes)
    Researchers aim was to assess the influence of maternal diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids on oxidative and molecular parameters in brains of mouse pups as well as their body weight during their lifetime. Female rats received a diet containing 20% of olive oil (OOED) and... 
    Read More →
  • How, when and why to fertilize the olive tree with nitrogen and potassium

    Two experiments were conducted for 13 years in two olive groves of southern Spain to study the long-term effect of nitrogen (N) fertilization on trees and soil. In the first experiment, 12-year-old ‘Picual’ olive trees were arranged in a split plot design with method of N application (soil versus a 50% soil:50% foliar combination) as the whole plot factor, and amount of N applied annually (0, 0.12, 0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 kg N tree−1) as the subplot factor. In the second experiment, N application to 50-year-old ‘Picual’ trees was based on the previous season’s leaf N concentration.

    Urea was the source of N in both experiments. During the last 4 years, soil samples were taken at 0–20, 20–40, 40–60, 60–80, and 80–100 cm depth to evaluate the effect of N application on soil eutrophication. Fertilization with N had no significant effects on yield, fruit characteristics, and growth of olive trees for the 13 years of study, even when leaf N concentration increased with the amount of fertilizer N applied. Combining soil and foliar application may reduce the amount of fertilizer N necessary to correct a possible N deficiency because our experiments showed this practice to be more effective in increasing leaf N that applying N only to the soil. Our results question the established deficiency threshold of 1.4% of N in dried leaf because no reduction in yield or growth was observed for lower concentrations. However, leaf N concentration did not drop below 1.2% after 13 years with no N application, probably because of N inputs from rainfall and the mineralization of organic N. Whereas under natural conditions of the non-fertilized treatments NH4+–N represented the dominant fraction of mineral N in soil, accumulation of high amounts of NO3−–N in the soil profile occurred in the fertilized plots, which represents a high risk of N leaching from soil.

    All these results suggest that annual applications of fertilizer N are unnecessary to maintain high productivity and growth in olive. Applying N only when the previous season’s leaf analysis indicates that leaf N concentration is below the deficiency threshold, is thus a recommended practice to optimize N fertilization in olive orchards and to reduce N losses by leaching.

    Experiments under both greenhouse and field conditions were performed to study the influence of the type of salt applied (KCl or K2SO4) and to compare the effectiveness of their method of application (soil versus foliar) on leaf K concentration and yield in olive trees established under rainfed conditions.

    In the experiment performed in the greenhouse, mist-rooted 3-month-old ‘Picual’ olive plants growing in 2-l pots containing perlite were irrigated with a complete nutrient solution containing either 0.05 or 2.5 mM KCl during 128 days after transplanting (DAT). A group of plants received one K soil application at a dose equivalent to 1 kg of K per tree at 63 DAT. Another group received four foliar applications at 63, 78, 93 and 108 DAT with a K concentration of 10.5 g/l. The experiment under field conditions was developed with 80-year-old ‘Hojiblanca’ olive trees. Soil application was performed in March every year at a rate of 1 kg K/tree by injecting K fertilizer around the trees. Foliar sprays were carried out in April, March, June and July every year with the same K concentration used for the greenhouse experiment. The results showed that, under both field and greenhouse conditions, either KCl or K2SO4 increased K concentration in leaves.

    Also, both K salts had a positive effect in increasing K content in fruits under field conditions, although the intensity of the increase varied among years.

    Tree water stress and low K status seemed to influence K uptake.

    The method of K application, soil or foliar, did not affect the effectiveness of K fertilization.

    Bibliography
    R. Fernández-Escobar, L. Marin, M.A. Sánchez-Zamora, J.M. García-Novelo, C. Molina-Soria, M.A. Parra, Long-term effects of N fertilization on cropping and growth of olive trees and on N accumulation in soil profile, European Journal of Agronomy, Volume 31, Issue 4, November 2009, Pages 223-232, ISSN 1161-0301

    H. Restrepo-Diaz, M. Benlloch, C. Navarro, Ricardo Fernández-Escobar, Potassium fertilization of rainfed olive orchards, Scientia Horticulturae, Volume 116, Issue 4, 20 May 2008, Pages 399-403, ISSN 0304-4238

    Source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.5/10 (191 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -7 (from 85 votes)
    Two experiments were conducted for 13 years in two olive groves of southern Spain to study the long-term effect of nitrogen (N) fertilization on trees and soil. In the first experiment, 12-year-old ‘Picual’ olive trees were arranged in a split plot design with method of N... 
    Read More →