Monthly Archives: December 2015

  • Imports of olive oil and olive pomace oil in Japan and South Korea - 2014/15

    At the close of the 2014/15 crop year, Japanese imports of olive oil and olive pomace oil totaled 61 877 t, recording 10 pc growth on the previous season. Imports are itemised by country of origin in Table 1, which shows that 96 pc of the aggregate tonnage came from European Union countries. For the second year running, Spain is in the lead, accounting for 54 pc of the total tonnage.

    Next in line comes Italy with 41 pc and Greece with 1 pc. Among the EU countries, Spain has seen its share of the Japanese market widen by 14 points from 40 pc in 2008/09 to 54pc in 2014/15, contrasting with Italy whose share narrowed by 11 points from 52 pc to 41 pc in the same period.
    The remaining 4 pc of imports came from non-EU countries, notably Turkey, although its market share fell by 3 points from 6 to 3 pc. Chart 1 gives the import breakdown by category for the last seven crop years. Virgin and extra virgin olive oil accounted for 71 pc of total imports, olive oil for 25 pc and olive pomace oil for 5 pc.

    Between 2008/09 and 2014/15 imports rose overall by 86 pc from 33 307 t to 61 877 t. Growth has been constant, except for a decrease in 2010/11.

    1
    In our May 2015 issue (No 94), we announced that the IOC Believe in Olive Oil promotion campaign in Japan would be getting off the ground in July. With the campaign now underway, recent events have included four workshops in four different Japanese cities (Tokyo, Nagoya, Kyoto and Fukuoka) targeted at the media, chefs, restaurateurs and olive oil importers.

    Held over four days from 20 to 23 October 2015, the workshops were a great success and received extensive media coverage. In each of the city venues, IOC officials described what the IOC does and explained about the grades and definitions of the different types of oil obtained from olives.

    These presentations were followed by a lecture on the health benefits of olive oil by renowned specialists and an olive oil tasting. A cookery demonstration brought the workshops to a close with well-known chefs showing participants how to pair olive oil with dishes from Japanese cuisine.

    Afterwards, the team from the IOC Executive Secretariat met with the authorities and olive oil producers in the Kagawa region where the IOC standard is already applied; the goal is to achieve the application of the IOC standard nationwide in Japan.

    Promotion will continue up to the end of the year and will feature a tour to Italy for media professionals and an olive oil recipe competition on the COOKPAD portal, which has over 20 million users. Find out more at http://believeoliveoil.jp/.

    SOUTH KOREA: At the end of the 2014/15 crop year, South Korean imports totalled 16 352 t of olive oil and olive pomace oil, down by 7 pc on 2013/14. Even so, though still small in volume terms, imports have grown by 71 pc between 2008/09 (9 590 t) and 2014/15 (16 352 t). Spain was the source of 71 pc of South Korean imports, followed by Italy with 25 pc, Turkey with 2 pc and the rest of the countries listed in Table 2. Chart 2 shows the breakdown of imports by category: 72 pc virgin and extra virgin; 9 pc olive oil (blend of refined and virgin) and 19
    pc olive pomace oil.

    2

    Source: International Olive Council MARKET NEWSLETTER No 98 – October 2015

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.6/10 (358 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +6 (from 128 votes)
    At the close of the 2014/15 crop year, Japanese imports of olive oil and olive pomace oil totaled 61 877 t, recording 10 pc growth on the previous season. Imports are itemised by country of origin in Table 1, which shows that 96 pc of the aggregate tonnage came from European... 
    Read More →
  • International Olive Oil Production Costs Study

    The average price of obtaining a kilo of oil in the world is of 2.63 euros, whereas the surface of each of the different producing countries. Specifically, the total cost of obtaining a kilo of oil on average regarding the importance of the production of olive field represents 84%, and based on transport and grinding, 16%.

    These are some of the results of the International Olive Oil Production Costs Study, accesed by Mercacei, commissioned by the IOC Council of Members. It has been conducted under the supervision of IOC Former Executive Director Jean-Louis Barjol and Deputy Director Ammar Assabah and the coordination of the Head of the IOC Statistics Department María Isabel Gómez, with the support of José María Penco (agronomist and project manager, Spanish Association of Olive Growing Municipalities (AEMO) and Juan Vilar (President, GEA Westfalia Separator Ibérica and lecturer at the University of Jaen).

    The objective of this study goes beyond merely determining the cost of producing one kilogram of olive oil in the IOC member countries. Its core aim is to help olive growers to identify the stages of crop management where they are less competitive than others and to encourage them to apply strategies to improve their competitiveness, for instance through technical assistance schemes.

    In this study, data have been analysed for 15 member countries of the IOC: Albania, Algeria, Argentina, Greece, Iran, Israel, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Portugal, Spain, Tunisia, Turkey and Uruguay. Therefore, seven cultivation systems have been defined into which all world olive orchards can be classified. Four of the systems are traditional (S1 to S4) and three are intensive (S5 to S7). Inside this chatacteristics, two categories of olive processing system are defined by modern centrifugation and traditional pressing.

    Conclusions
    The study concludes that the most frequent cultivation system in all the countries is the traditional rainfed system on steep slopes (33 %), followed by the traditional rainfed system on moderate slopes (30 %) and the intensive irrigated system (18 %). The least frequent systems are the traditional irrigated system on steep slopes (0.6 %) and the superintensive system (4 %).
    The research done by this stury demonstrates that drip irrigation is the predominant irrigation system. Water consumption is higher in the southern Mediterranean countries than in the northern Mediterranean European countries.
    It is clear that cultivation is less mechanised in the southern Mediterranean countries, with the exception of Israel. Thus, local and autochthonous varieties predominate in the traditional cultivation systems whereas new varieties are preponderant in the intensive systems.

    Production
    Regarding production, oil yield is greater in the traditional olive growing countries in the Southern Mediterranean region and much lower in the South American countries.
    Olive crop production under rainfed conditions is considerably higher in the eastern Mediterranean countries – the cradle of olive growing – than in the western Mediterranean countries.
    Otherwise, oil production per hectare increases with crop intensification and irrigation, showing a linear increase from S1 (370 kg./ha.) to S7 (1,579 kg./ha).
    Average production, all systems and countries combined, works out at 816 kg. of oil/ha. The countries with the highest unit production are Israel, Albania and Algeria and those with the lowest are Italy, Iran, Morocco and Tunisia.

    Costs
    Cultivation costs differ sharply between both the producing countries and the cultivation systems. Therefore, the intensive and irrigated cultivation systems (S6 and S7) have the highest production costs/ha but also the highest production; as a result, unit costs are lower. Conversely, the more traditional and rainfed systems have higher unit production costs/kg olives, i.e. they are less profitable.
    On-farm olive production costs account for 84 % of the total cost of producing one kilogram of oil; olive transportation and processing account for the remaining 16 %. Attention therefore needs to focus on optimising agricultural production where is there is more room for improvement.
    At processing level, costs differ greatly between countries, ranging from 0.16 euros/kg. crushed olives in Uruguay to 0.03 euros/kg. in Spain, and are chiefly determined by average mill size.
    As we have already pointed out the average total cost of production of one kilogram of oil, itemised by cultivation system, ranges from 3.45 euros/kg. in the traditional rainfed system on steep slopes (S1) to 2.05 euros/kg. in the superintensive system (S7). Costs vary linearly between these two figures as crop intensification increases.

    The arithmetic average cost of producing one kilogram of oil in all countries works out at 2.78 euros/kg. Of this figure, 2.33 euros/kg. are on-farm costs and 0.45 euros/kg. are transport and oil processing costs.

    Taking into account the significance of the participant countries in terms of olive crop area, the mean world weighted cost of producing one kilogram of oil comes to 2.63 euros/kg.

    The countries where the average weighted costs are considerably above the mean are, in descending order, Iran, Lebanon, Algeria, Uruguay, Italy and Israel. Otherwise, the countries where average weighted costs are very far below the mean are clearly Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey.

    There are very wide cost differences between countries. The highest mean price is recorded in Iran (6.26 euros/kg.) and the lowest in Turkey (1.93 euros/kg).

    Costs in Jordan, Albania, Argentina, Spain, Greece and Portugal lie around the world average.

    Generally, the countries where the cost of producing one kilogram of olive oil is the most advantageous are located in the southern and eastern Mediterranean region (specifically Morocco and Tunisia in North Africa, and Turkey). Olive cultivation can therefore be expected to expand in these countries in the future, either with domestic or foreign capital.

    Costs are inevitably higher in some producing countries for clear, concrete reasons, for instance because of higher water costs in Israel and low oil yields in Uruguay.

    There are major between-country differences in costs, even within the same cultivation systems. Apart from features specific to each country, this is due to differences in olive crop management practices. Hence, there is ample room for lowering costs in the countries where they are the highest through the transfer of technology and expertise and permanent training.

    source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.3/10 (332 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -16 (from 128 votes)
    The average price of obtaining a kilo of oil in the world is of 2.63 euros, whereas the surface of each of the different producing countries. Specifically, the total cost of obtaining a kilo of oil on average regarding the importance of the production of olive field represents... 
    Read More →
  • Olive oil paying off for Sacramento area casino tribe

    The alfalfa fields, ranches and small, organic produce farms of the Capay Valley, located about an hour outside of Sacramento, California, have helped it earn a reputation for being an ideal location for agriculture. The serene setting is also the unlikely home of the Cache Creek Casino, the valley’s most lucrative business.

    Run by the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation of California, the casino sees a lot of traffic and has caused tension between local farmers and the tribe. That source of tension however, is the very reason the Yocha Dehe are able to fund its newest venture located across the rural highway; its own brand of olive oil. Along with the tribe’s olives, approximately 40 of the region’s growers process their own olives at the Yocha Dehe’s state-of-the-art facility using equipment imported from Florence, Italy.

    Since former Tribal Chairman Marshall McKay’s visit to the nearby University of California, Davis’ olive center about a decade ago, the Yocha Dehe tribe has advanced to the forefront of the industry. Only in its fifth year of production, the tribe grows, mills and markets its extra-virgin olive oil, which is used in more than 200 restaurants, including the Chez Panisse named best restaurant in America in 2001. Seka Hills, a premium version of the oil, can be found in upscale farmers markets and premium specialty shops.

    While the arbequina olives are new in the valley, the Yocha Dehe and other Native American groups are not. McKay says, “People, outsiders came into the valley: Gold Rush prospectors, cattle ranchers, soldiers.” His ancestors fled to the hills, but many were still massacred, according to KTOO. Tribes thrived in villages for thousands of years until European contact.

    Growing up in sever poverty and in single parent homes was the norm for the tribe, according to Yocha Dehe tribal secretary, James Kinter. Then in the 1980’s as laws governing Indian gaming began to loosen, the Yocha Dehe opened a bingo hall, and eventually a casino in 1985. The casino now averages 2,000 visitors a day and reportedly earns the tribe hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

    While new found wealth for the tribe, the casino and its development has caused concern for some of its neighbors regarding increased traffic on the rural roads and the tribes operating under different regulations than others in the valley. They are also concerned about future casino-related development and the impact it could have on the agricultural character of the valley. However, McKay says that tensions between the tribe and its farming neighbors have eased due to the opening of the olive mill and agricultural work being done by the Yocha Dehe.

    article source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.2/10 (206 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 84 votes)
    The alfalfa fields, ranches and small, organic produce farms of the Capay Valley, located about an hour outside of Sacramento, California, have helped it earn a reputation for being an ideal location for agriculture. The serene setting is also the unlikely home of the Cache Creek... 
    Read More →