Monthly Archives: November 2015

  • Olive Oil appear to boost Brain Power when added to Plant-Based Diet

    We know that fish has a well-earned reputation as brain food. But not every stay-sharp ingredient has gills and lives underwater.

    Some land-based sources of healthy fats include olive oil and nuts. Olive oil and nuts appear to boost brainpower when added to a plant-based diet.

    Not surprisingly the Mediterranean diet was seen as a valuable aid. This diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and beans.

    In a recent study, people who ate the Mediterranean diet boosted with nuts improved their memory when examined on a test designed to look at recall. The scientists are not certain why this is the case but one of the theories is that it helps with flow of blood to the brain.

    Article by Dr. Brian McDonough, source
    Dr. Brian McDonough has been medical editor at KYW Newsradio for more than a quarter-century (since 1987)! Brian McDonough has been honored as Family Physician of the Year by the Delaware Academy of Family Physicians, and is a Sir William Osler.

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    We know that fish has a well-earned reputation as brain food. But not every stay-sharp ingredient has gills and lives underwater. Some land-based sources of healthy fats include olive oil and nuts. Olive oil and nuts appear to boost brainpower when added to a plant-based diet. Not... 
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  • Italian olive oil producers accused of fraud

    Top Italian olive oil producers are under investigation for allegedly passing off lower-quality products as “extra virgin”, raising fresh concerns about allegations of consumer fraud in the industry.

    Turin police are examining whether seven companies – Carapelli, Bertolli, Santa Sabina, Coricelli, Sasso, Primadonna, and Antica Badia – have been selling virgin olive oil as 100% extra virgin.

    According to allegations in Italian press reports, an analysis of samples from all seven brands found that they did not meet EU labelling rules for extra virgin olive oil.

    One of the companies under investigation, Coricelli, said the inquiry was based entirely on taste tests by professional tasters that could not reliably discern whether the oil met industry standards.

    “The protested batch, before being sold on the market, had been carefully analysed either by the company or independently recognised laboratories and all the analysis confirmed compliance to the quality standards,” Coricelli said.

    The company promised to present the prosecutor investigating the case with counter-analysis to confirm that its behaviour was “fair and correct”. The other companies under investigation did not respond to requests for comment.

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    Top Italian olive oil producers are under investigation for allegedly passing off lower-quality products as “extra virgin”, raising fresh concerns about allegations of consumer fraud in the industry. Turin police are examining whether seven companies – Carapelli, Bertolli,... 
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  • Xylella fastidiosa: knowledge gaps and research priorities for the EU

    More than 100 scientists and other experts from around the world will meet this week to propose and discuss research initiatives that can further scientific understanding of the Xylella fastidiosa bacterium and help find solutions for its control. Registration for the meeting is closed but the opening and closing plenary meetings will be streamed live via the EFSA website.

    As well as the two plenary meetings, four breakout sessions will look at:

    Surveillance and detection.
    The vectors: identity, biology, epidemiology and control.
    The plants: host range, breeding, resistance and certification.
    The pathogen: biology, genetics, control.

    The workshop – to be held in Brussels on 12-13 November – is hosted by EFSA in collaboration with the European Commission’s Directorates-General for Research and Innovation, Agriculture and Rural Development, and Health and Food Safety.

    X. fastidiosa is one of the most dangerous plant pathogens worldwide, damaging important crops including fruit trees, grapevine and ornamentals. Emergency measures have been in place in the EU since the first outbreak of X. fastidiosa in the territory in 2013.

    See the full programme here.

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    More than 100 scientists and other experts from around the world will meet this week to propose and discuss research initiatives that can further scientific understanding of the Xylella fastidiosa bacterium and help find solutions for its control. Registration for the meeting... 
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  • Mario Solinas Quality Award of the International Olive Council for the 2015/16 Campaign

    Every year the International Olive Council organises the competition for the Mario Solinas Quality Awards, whose main objective is to select, among the EVOOs that participate those with the highest organoleptic characteristics in each of the categories set (Green fruitiness -Intense, Medium and Mild fruitiness- and Ripe fruitiness.

    The international competition for extra virgin olive oils leading to the Mario Solinas Quality Award of the International Olive Council (IOC) is based on Decision No DEC-1/82-IV/00 which the Council adopted on 8 June 2000. According to this decision, the Award was launched in the 2000–2001 crop year in the wake of the Council’s 1993 decision to create it as a memorial and tribute to one of the most important advocates of the sensory analysis of virgin olive oil, the late Professor Mario Solinas of Italian nationality.

    Its main objective is to select the extra virgin olive oils entered for the competition that display the best organoleptic characteristics in each of the categories established in these rules.

    Extra virgin olive oils presented by registered individual producers, producers’ associations and packers may be entered for the competition. Two editions of the competition will be held in 2016 in order to increase the number and geographical diversity of entries. The deadlines will be 27 January 2016 for the first edition and 21 June 2016 for the second.

    The prizes for the winning oils shall be awarded by the Executive Director of the International Olive Council or other authorities, at a place and on a date which have yet to be determined. The prizes shall comprise a medal (gold, silver or bronze) for the winners in each category who will also receive a diploma. The three finalists in each category will receive a finalist diploma.

    The results of the competition shall be published on the IOC website.

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    Every year the International Olive Council organises the competition for the Mario Solinas Quality Awards, whose main objective is to select, among the EVOOs that participate those with the highest organoleptic characteristics in each of the categories set (Green fruitiness -Intense,... 
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  • John Kampouris: The olive oil market has enormous growth potential

    The writer, professor and entrepreneur Ioannis Kampouris from Imvrian descent, knows the secrets of olive oil. So he created an olive oil full of flavors, aromas and memories that won prizes in international competitions.

    The legacy of his grandparents becomes his standard for the uncompromising quality of E-LA-WON products.
    John Kampouris smWe are talking about extra virgin olive oil with fresh olive scent, which begins to conquer distinctions and awards in domestic and international quality competitions.
    Mr. Ioannis Kampouris’ motto is “dreams and quality know no borders. The olive oil market has enormous growth potential. ”

    Question: What are the hidden secrets of your product name?
    Answer: The name is the original syllabographic version of the word OIL = E-LA-WON in Linear B, the first version of the Greek Language, in the Mycenaean period from the 17th to the 13th century BC. The ideogram, shown in perspective-linear forms which are part of our logo, is visually readable.

    Question: So your product took you as far as Japan and Israel ?
    Answer: In the annual International Competition of Olive «OLIVE JAPAN» held in Tokyo in April 2015 by the Japan Link of Olive Oil Sommelier that brings the highest standards of integrity and professionalism and applies the strictest quality criteria, distinguished ELAWON as one of the excellent virgin olive oils and won the silver medal. We also won the gold medal at the Olive Oil World Contest «Terraolivo International Competition 2015» in June 2015, held in Israel.

    Question: And what about the packaging prize?
    Answer: In “7th Elaiotechnia 2015 Mediterranean exhibition of olive and olive oil ‘, the most comprehensive report on the olive sector in Greece, ELAWON won the Gold Packaging Award and got a praise for the overall image. The package is like a museum showcase andn it offers a day experience full of aesthetics, history and flavor.

    Question: Do these distinctions create responsibility?
    Answer: It works as an incentive for even greater distinctions in international competitions. We insist on the systematic work and on maintaining our quality standards of the E-LA-WON, like the aromas range, the unique flavors of the blessed Peloponnesian land. We respect the consumer and propose a timeless genuine product that encompasses our love and desire. Although we are young in the project, we have five generations of family tradition which goes back to 1858.

    Question: Did the crisis scare you?
    Answer: I am a writer, professor and businessman and was recently turned into somebody dealing with land and olive oil. What moved me to take this turn was a combination of memories, passion and sorrow. Memories of the olive trees of Imvros, which is Turkish now. An unforgettable childhood… The “Liostasi”, the oil mill in the village next to the stream, the smell of oil from the golden faucet, damp with all the scents of the island, the “sfides” with the oil of the year in the basement, this first oil-bread, called “ladopsomo” with salt and oregano, all these images made me, when I was away from the place of my homeland, convey all this tradition to my privately owned olive groves in the blessed land of the Peloponnese, in the eternal land of the Atreides.

    Question: What makes your product stand out?
    Answer: It is the same recipe handed down from generation to generation. A unique dining experience, the result of long experience and know-how, responsibility and respect of the human-consumer. Also its authentic taste, that of pure olive oil, exactly as it was 3500 years ago, from olives grown in mild ways, environmentally friendly, pesticide-free, chemical-free formulations and zero pollution index.

    Question: What is the variety of your product? What are the features available?
    Answer: Our oil olive is of the “Koroneiki” variety, the queen of the oil that is in the highest position in the value system of the Mediterranean gastronomy products. It is a result of “cold” export, with marvelous organoleptic properties, low acidity with fruity tomato leaf aromas and lemon flower, with subtle and spicy almond flavor and a slightly bitter aftertaste of the early harvest, as the harvest is done when the olives are painted with their best colour, the golden. It contains high amount of polyphenols – oleocanthal and oleacain- that contribute to the protection of blood lipids from oxidative stress.

    Question: Is the olive oil market in our country interesting?
    Answer: The “Liquid Gold of Greece” must be given the place it deserves in the stock of nutrition and health. We looked back to go forward and we built the E-LA-WON whose values excel in quality, taste and price. The product is produced in strictly limited quantities and will be available in delicatessen and selected luxury hotels in Greece, Norway, the United Arab Emirates, Germany and England while in the immediate plans is the development and distribution in the US and Russia.

    Question: And how does all this feel for the creator?
    Answer: “When you make it, you feel like an alchemist of nature, as it encapsulates bottled sunshine and the generosity of Greek olives and these waves of flavors that are emerging and dancing as if in a festival …”

    Article originaly was published here

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    The writer, professor and entrepreneur Ioannis Kampouris from Imvrian descent, knows the secrets of olive oil. So he created an olive oil full of flavors, aromas and memories that won prizes in international competitions. The legacy of his grandparents becomes his standard for... 
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  • Movements in the prices paid to producers for extra virgin olive oil

    Graph 1 tracks the weekly movements in the prices paid to producers for extra virgin olive oil in the three top EU producing countries plus Tunisia while Graph 3 shows the weekly changes in the producer prices for refined olive oil in the three main EU producers. The monthly price movements for the same two grades of oil are tracked in Graphs 2 and 4.

    It is not for the IOC to judge whether these price levels reflect an adequate balance between production costs along the supply chain and the prices that consumers are prepared to pay in their domestic currency to continue consuming olive oil. Nevertheless, this is a concern that all the players on the market will no doubt take into account with an eye to the long-term sustainable equilibrium and development of the sector.

    Extra virgin olive oil: Producer prices in Spain started to rise in November 2014. After topping €4/kg in the second week of August 2015, they continued upwards to reach a period high (€4.23/kg) in the third week of August, at which point they switched direction, falling to €3.73/kg by the last week of October 2015. This latest price level is still 42 pc higher than a year earlier and 90 pc above the low recorded in the third week of May 2014 (€1.96/kg).

    Italy: In the week from 10 to 16 November 2014, producer prices in Italy hit the highest level of both the period under review and the last decade, reaching €6.79/kg. After decreasing slightly in the second last week of December 2014 prices turned back upwards, only to fluctuate again and then drop sharply, reaching €4.38/kg by the end of October 2015, i.e. still 7 pc higher than a year earlier and 66 pc more than the low recorded in the second week of December 2013 (€2.64/kg). Graph 2 shows how the monthly prices of extra virgin olive oil have behaved in recent crop years.

    Greece: In the third week of January 2015, prices in Greece crossed the three-euro/kg line. After small fluctuations, they rose to period highs (€3.54/kg) in the last weeks of August and first week of September 2015. In recent weeks they have been holding steady and were lying at €3.29/kg at the end of October 2015, +24 pc higher than the same period a season earlier.

    Tunisia: After starting to move upwards in the first week of January 2015, producer prices recorded some small fluctuations, then climbing to period highs in the last weeks of August. Then, like elsewhere, they started to drop, reaching €3.73/kg by the end of October 2015, equating with period-on-period growth of +29 pc.

    Refined olive oil:

    In August 2015 producer prices for refined olive oil hit their highest levels for the period under review. In Spain they then started to drop, reaching €3.34/kg by the end of October 2015, although this level was still 31 pc higher than in the same period of the preceding crop year.

    The trend in Italy has been similar in that prices had dropped to €3.35/kg by the end of October 2015, although again this was still higher (+32 pc) than the same period the season before. No price data are available for this product category in Greece.

    At the end of October 2015, the price of refined olive oil (€3.34/kg) and extra virgin olive oil (€3.73/kg ) differed by €0.39/kg in Spain whereas in Italy the difference between the two categories was considerably wider (€1.03/kg – Graph 3).

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    Source: International Olive Council  MARKET NEWSLETTER No 98 – October 2015

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    Graph 1 tracks the weekly movements in the prices paid to producers for extra virgin olive oil in the three top EU producing countries plus Tunisia while Graph 3 shows the weekly changes in the producer prices for refined olive oil in the three main EU producers. The monthly... 
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  • World trade in olive oil and table olives – 2014/15 crop year

    Imports of olive oil (customs heading 15.09) and olive pomace oil (customs heading 15.10) through eleven of the 12 months in the 2014/15 crop year (October 2014–August 2015) are reported in the table below for a number of countries.

    Compared with the same period in 2013/14, Japanese imports have risen by 11 pc, showing strong growth since March 2015. Imports into the United States have gone up by 1 pc while remaining stable in China.

    Conversely, imports are lower in Australia (−20 pc, moving constantly downward since November 2014), Canada (−9 pc) and Brazil (-6 pc), which recorded sharp decreases in May and June. The August 2015 data for Russia were not available at the time of writing but the ten-month figures are lower (−29 pc), prompted by a switch of trend in December 2014.
    2015-11-06_olive_oil_imports
    The August 2015 data were not available either for the EU at the time of publication but the figures for the first ten months of 2014/15 show steady intra-EU acquisitions but a steep 295 pc in extra-EU imports compared with the same period a season earlier.

    Owing to the heavy drop in 2014/15 production in Spain and Italy, extra-EU imports by both countries soared, particularly imports from Tunisia (+1300 pc and +359 pc, respectively) compared with a season earlier.

    As reported in the previous issue of this newsletter, this upward movement began in December 2014 and is connected with the large climb in Tunisian production in 2014/15, which positioned Tunisia as the world’s top exporter that season.

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    Imports of olive oil (customs heading 15.09) and olive pomace oil (customs heading 15.10) through eleven of the 12 months in the 2014/15 crop year (October 2014–August 2015) are reported in the table below for a number of countries. Compared with the same period in 2013/14,... 
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  • Japan and South Korea imports of olive oil and olive pomace oil

    At the close of the 2014/15 crop year, Japanese imports of olive oil and olive pomace oil totalled 61 877 t, recording 10 pc growth on the previous season. Imports are itemised by country of origin in Table 1, which shows that 96 pc of the aggregate tonnage came from European Union countries.

    For the second year running, Spain is in the lead, accounting for 54 pc of the total tonnage. Next in line comes Italy with 41 pc and Greece with 1 pc. Among the EU countries, Spain has seen its share of the Japanese market widen by 14 points from 40 pc in 2008/09 to 54 pc in 2014/15, contrasting with Italy whose share narrowed by 11 points from 52 pc to 41 pc in the same period.

    The remaining 4 pc of imports came from non-EU countries, notably Turkey, although its market share fell by 3 points from 6 to 3 pc. Chart 1 gives the import breakdown by category for the last seven crop years. Virgin and extra virgin olive oil accounted for 71 pc of total imports, olive oil for 25 pc and olive pomace oil for 5 pc.

    Between 2008/09 and 2014/15 imports rose overall by 86 pc from 33 307 t to 61 877 t. Growth has been constant, except for a decrease in 2010/11.

    In our May 2015 issue (No 94), we announced that the IOC Believe in Olive Oil promotion campaign in Japan would be getting off the ground in July. With the campaign now underway, recent events have included four workshops in four different Japanese cities (Tokyo, Nagoya, Kyoto and Fukuoka) targeted at the media, chefs, restaurateurs and olive oil importers.

    Held over four days from 20 to 23 October 2015, the workshops were a great success and received extensive media coverage. In each of the city venues, IOC officials described what the IOC does and explained about the grades and definitions of the different types of oil obtained from olives.

    These presentations were followed by a lecture on the health benefits of olive oil by renowned specialists and an olive oil tasting. A cookery demonstration brought the workshops to a close with well-known chefs showing participants how to pair olive oil with dishes from Japanese cuisine.

    Afterwards, the team from the IOC Executive Secretariat met with the authorities and olive oil producers in the Kagawa region where the IOC standard is already applied; the goal is to achieve the application of the IOC standard nationwide in Japan.

    Promotion will continue up to the end of the year and will feature a tour to Italy for media professionals and an olive oil recipe competition on the COOKPAD portal, which has over 20 million users. Find out more at http://believe-oliveoil.jp/.

    SOUTH KOREA:
    At the end of the 2014/15 crop year, South Korean imports totalled 16 352 t of olive oil and olive pomace oil, down by 7 pc on 2013/14. Even so, though still small in volume terms, imports have grown by 71 pc between 2008/09 (9 590 t) and 2014/15 (16 352 t).

    Spain was the source of 71 pc of South Korean imports, followed by Italy with 25 pc, Turkey with 2 pc and the rest of the countries listed in Table 2. Chart 2 shows the breakdown of imports by category: 72 pc virgin and extra virgin; 9 pc olive oil (blend of refined and virgin) and 19 pc olive pomace oil.

    Source: IOC MARKET NEWSLETTER No 98 – October 2015

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    At the close of the 2014/15 crop year, Japanese imports of olive oil and olive pomace oil totalled 61 877 t, recording 10 pc growth on the previous season. Imports are itemised by country of origin in Table 1, which shows that 96 pc of the aggregate tonnage came from European... 
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  • The world olive oil market Leadership through Partnership

    Τhe Baltimore-based importer and distributor of olive oil and vinegar Pompeian Group, is entering into a new equal partnership with the DCOOP Group of Spain, the largest olive oil cooperative in the world. Pompeian, through its group of olive oil companies in the United States, and DCOOP, through its subsidiary Mercaóleo, will conduct an exchange of shares with a transfer of assets between both holding companies. The partnership creates the global leader in olive oil, striving to meet the soaring demand for high quality, authentic olive oil with full traceability from tree to bottle. The first-of-its-kind agreement brings together the best possible raw materials and the finest production and bottling facilities in the world, merging assets that include an ultra-modern production facility in Spain directly next to the olive farms.

    Pompeian Group is the top importer and manufacturer of olive oil in the United States that produces the #1 selling extra virgin olive oil on the market. A pioneer in bringing quality olive oil to the American table, Pompeian is the first national brand to carry the USDA Quality Monitored Seal. In addition, Pompeian’s commitment to quality is extended through North American Olive Oil Association (NAOOA) and British Retail Consortium certifications and Carbon Trust membership. The family-owned Pompeian Group includes manufacturing plants on both the east and west coast. Additionally, the brand owns an olive grove in California. The Pompeian Group produces olive oils and vinegars sold under the Pompeian brand name.

    The DCOOP Group of Spain is made up of 75,000 family farmers. The cooperative produces more than 250,000 metric tons of olive oil per year through 50 million trees. The world’s largest olive grower, the DCOOP farmers produce a diverse crop, including Picual, Cornicabra, Manzanilla, Verdiales, Lechines and Arbequina olives.

    “We are excited to work side by side with the DCOOP Group on this partnership to form a uniquely integrated group,” said David Bensadoun, Chief Executive Officer of Pompeian Group. “Pompeian Group and the DCOOP Group share the same values and passion to work directly with family farmers to provide the highest quality olive oil in the world. The agreement will allow Pompeian Group to continue sourcing and producing the finest olive oil for U.S. consumers all year round.”

    DCOOP Group Chief Executive Officer Antonio Luque gave the following statement: “Pompeian Group is the most notable brand of olive oil in the United States and we are delighted to work together to ensure that the American table has consistent, quality olive oil. This partnership is the first step in building a leading olive oil enterprise that will provide consumers with full transparency from farm to plate.”

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    Τhe Baltimore-based importer and distributor of olive oil and vinegar Pompeian Group, is entering into a new equal partnership with the DCOOP Group of Spain, the largest olive oil cooperative in the world. Pompeian, through its group of olive oil companies in the United States,... 
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  • Giving Olive Oil a Tasty New Purpose

    No longer just for dipping and drizzling, olive oil is a good fat in the creative hands of local chefs

    Tuna tartare with olive oil “caviar” at Picasso, and a cone of Gelatology’s olive oil gelato. | Photo by Krystal Ramirez

    Olive oil has come a long way since the stuff Vito Corleone used as a front for his family business. Between the estates that produce it, the harvest dates, the various flavor infusions and countless other factors, modern EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) experts can sound rather pretentious as they rattle off facts about their favorite oils. And with such diverse and high-quality products available, it’s not surprising that chefs are inventing more interesting uses for them. Here are a few dishes Don Corleone probably never would have imagined.

    Potato Puree

    Alizé chef Mark Purdy uses olive oil in his potatoes in lieu of milk and butter. The result is a smooth-but-firm take on mashed potatoes. Purdy says oils offer him something the traditional preparation cannot: the opportunity to subtly flavor the potatoes to accompany the entrée. In fact, he says the oil actually ends up being the star of the side dish. “The potato itself is kind of neutral,” he says. “So it’s just a way to get the oil’s flavor on the plate.” Included with entrée, the Palms, 702-951-7000, AlizeLV.com.

    “Caviar”

    Since Ferran Adria and José Andrés launched the molecular gastronomy craze, chefs have been scrambling to capture the essence of just about any ingredient they can think of in spherical encapsulations reminiscent of fish eggs. Swing by Artisanal Foods and you’ll find an entire shelf section dedicated to Caviaroli. Or, to see them in use, head to Picasso (Bellagio, 866-259-7111, Bellagio.com/Picasso), where chef Julian Serrano garnishes his tuna tartare with olive oil caviars because, Serrano says, “they add a nice oily component that has a little bit of bite.” $45/200 grams, $30/50 grams, 2053 E. Pama Lane, 702-436-4252, Artisanal Foods.com.

    Muffins

    Giada de Laurentiis has long been a proponent of baking with olive oil. In one entry on her official blog, GiadaWeekly.com, de Laurentiis noted that it was a healthier alternative to butter, and promised, “It gives cakes, muffins, and breads a melting tenderness, and makes them seductively rich and moist.” You can judge for yourself during the weekend brunch at her eponymous restaurant in the Cromwell, where she serves up EVOO-infused muffins in both banana and gluten-free blueberry varieties. $4 each, 702-777-3777, Caesars.com/Cromwell.

    Cake

    Giada isn’t the only chef to embrace the use of olive oil in baked goods. At Hearthstone Kitchen & Cellar, chef Brian Massie offers a moist, round honey olive oil sponge cake. The two main ingredients combine to create a sweet, smooth base that seems to coat the interior of your mouth—but in a good way. The topping of blood orange sorbet is almost superfluous on a cake this good, although a dollop of whipped cream complements it nicely. $9, Red Rock Resort, 702-797-7344, HearthstoneLV.com.

    Gelato

    Superstar gelato maker Desyree Alberganti has plenty of far-out flavors on the rotating menu at her new shop, Gelatology. In fact, once you’ve tried her jalapeño cornbread gelato, or the foie gras version, olive oil doesn’t even seem all that wild. And it’s not. On the contrary, it’s a comforting take on plain vanilla. But the oil gives this scoop something special, offering up mild hints of its underlying flavors, while adding an extra layer of “smooth” to the product. It may not be as flashy as some of its neighbors in the freezer, but has just as much to offer. $4-$8.50, 7910 S. Rainbow Blvd., 702-914-9144, Facebook.com/GelatologyLV. 

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    No longer just for dipping and drizzling, olive oil is a good fat in the creative hands of local chefs Tuna tartare with olive oil “caviar” at Picasso, and a cone of Gelatology’s olive oil gelato. | Photo by Krystal Ramirez Olive oil has come a long way since the stuff... 
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  • Autumn veg recipes for an exciting packed lunch

    Kale pesto, roast pumpkin, celeriac remoulade, roasted radicchio with olive oil are easy to make and will have you looking forward to lunchtime.

    Pumpkins are in season and people are arguing over when it’s OK to start wearing tights (call us crazy, but surely when your legs are cold?). It’s official, then: welcome, season of mists, Puffa jackets, and a new range of delicious veg. Surely, we can’t be the only impulse shoppers to buy a massive bag of kale at the weekend, only to find it at the back of the fridge, forgotten, on Thursday?

    Save your on-the-edge kale by making pesto: blanch in boiling water, drain and pat dry. Remove any tough stalks. Blitz with olive oil, sea salt, pepper, a handful of skinned nuts (optional), and a chunk of hard cheese, such as parmesan or mature cheddar. Add more oil as needed, season to taste. We sometimes add anchovies. Refrigerate until needed. Mix through warm, cooked pasta for a speedy lunch. Upgrade a shop-bought sandwich or soup with a dollop – it’s great in minestrone.

    Pumpkins tend to end up as soup or filled with tealights but, as with most veg, they benefit from roasting. Cut a small pumpkin into 2-3cm wedges. Lay on a foil-lined baking tray. Drizzle with olive oil, sea salt, a good grinding of pepper, a pinch of chilli flakes, and any other spices you fancy adding – try fennel, cumin or caraway seeds. Roast at 200C/400F/gas mark 6 until tender and caramelised. Chop into chunks, then mix with a drained tin of chickpeas, adding the roasting juices. To make a dressing, add 1 tbsp tahini, the juice of half a lemon, 1 crushed garlic clove and a pinch of sea salt to a small jam jar and shake to combine. Pour over your pumpkin and chickpea salad at lunchtime. A squirt of chilli sauce would also be good.

    Our favourite thing to make with celeriac is remoulade. Peel and cut a small celeriac into thin batons – or use a julienne peeler. Combine with around 2 tbsp creme fraiche, the juice of ½ lemon and 2 tsp dijon mustard, season to taste. Spread on a lightly toasted bagel and drape with smoked salmon for a dreamy seasonal sandwich. Leftover remoulade is delicious for lunch or dinner with a hot, buttered baked potato.

    Bitter leaves are beautifully wintry but, well, a bit too salady for when it’s nippy out. A roasted radicchio open sandwich is mellower and much more filling. Cut a head of radicchio in half and lay on a small foil-lined baking tray. Drizzle with olive oil, a little balsamic vinegar, season, then roast at 180C/350F/gas mark 4 until tender. Transfer to a plastic container, shave over some parmesan, then eat at lunch on top of a couple of slices of toast.

    Recipes by Caroline Craig and Sophie Missing, authors of The Little Book of Lunch (Square Peg)

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    Kale pesto, roast pumpkin, celeriac remoulade, roasted radicchio with olive oil are easy to make and will have you looking forward to lunchtime. Pumpkins are in season and people are arguing over when it’s OK to start wearing tights (call us crazy, but surely when your legs... 
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  • Butterflied Roast Chicken with Olive Oil for Thanksgiving

    There are so many techniques out there; many people I know claim that their recipe is “the best.” My dear pal and colleague, Laurie Burrows Grad, esteemed for her cookbooks and prowess in the kitchen, is adamant that this is “The One” — the best roast chicken ever.

    It is Seriously Simple and delicious!
    To butterfly a whole chicken means to remove the chicken’s backbone so you can open it like a book, or a butterfly, and lay it flat so it will cook evenly.

    If you don’t want to butterfly the chicken, ask your butcher to do it for you. Laurie suggests that you embellish the chicken with rosemary or other fresh herbs.

    I sometimes cut up an orange or a sweet Meyer lemon and add it to the potatoes on the bottom of the pan. You can also add carrots and mushrooms to the potatoes.

    BUTTERFLIED ROAST CHICKEN

    INGREDIENTS:
    – Extra Virgin Olive oil
    – 1 large roasting chicken (4 to 4 1⁄2 pounds), butterflied
    – Seasoning salt, to taste
    – Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
    – 12 small new potatoes, sliced in half
    – 8 peeled shallots, sliced in half
    – Olive oil cooking spray
    – Salt, to taste

    DIRECTIONS:
    – Heat a convection oven to 450 degrees or a standard oven to 500 degrees.
    – Rub olive oil on both sides of the chicken, season with seasoning salt and pepper, and place in a large roasting pan skin side up, splayed out.

    – Place the cut potatoes and shallots around the sides and coat them with olive oil cooking spray. Season the potatoes and onions with salt and pepper.

    – If using a convection oven, roast the chicken at 450 degrees for 45 to 50 minutes. If using a regular oven, roast it at 500 degrees for 45 to 50 minutes. To make sure it is cooked through, use a meat thermometer and make sure the thigh is at 165 degrees.

    – Remove and let rest for 10 minutes. Carve and serve alongside the potatoes and onions.

    Makes 4 servings.

    Recipe source

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    Rating: 3.3/10 (509 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +19 (from 219 votes)
    There are so many techniques out there; many people I know claim that their recipe is “the best.” My dear pal and colleague, Laurie Burrows Grad, esteemed for her cookbooks and prowess in the kitchen, is adamant that this is “The One” — the best roast chicken ever.... 
    Read More →
  • EU Financial Instruments for agriculture & rural development

    EU agriculture and agri-food sectors, and indeed the wider rural economies of the EU, can be key drivers of job creation and growth in the coming years. But it will not happen without investment, and – crucially – the right type of investment.

    Before turning to the role and potential impact of Financial Instruments, I would like to remind you how important agriculture and the agri-food sectors are to the European economy. Reliable data show that the sector has been more resilient in times of crisis than many others.

    Not only that, but through investment and innovation, and the Commission’s ambitious pursuit of trade agreements, the sector has managed to find a number of new markets, thereby stimulating an further growth and job creation.

    Following the recent reform of the Common Agricultural Policy, farmers will be far more market-oriented in their production decisions.

    And through the new Rural Development Programmes, Member States and regions also have at their disposal a wide range of co-funded investment opportunities designed to help individuals or companies make additional investment, creating further growth and jobs.

    It is in this context that I see Financial Instruments as a very important tool for boosting EU agriculture.

    Financial instruments are key tools to increase the leverage of the EAFRD. The Commission has worked closely with our bank, the European Investment Bank, to develop schemes that reflect the present and future needs of our farmers, foresters and related rural businesses.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.2/10 (406 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +21 (from 143 votes)
    EU agriculture and agri-food sectors, and indeed the wider rural economies of the EU, can be key drivers of job creation and growth in the coming years. But it will not happen without investment, and – crucially – the right type of investment. Before turning to the role and... 
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  • Thermal conditioning to increase quality parameters of EVOO

    Thermal conditioning of olive paste comes into the mill contributing to the increase in quality parameters of extra virgin olive oil.

    The Thermal Conditioning Module consists in a highly efficient tubular heat exchanger installed in the line after the crusher, able to bring down the olive paste temperature immediately before sending it to malaxer for gradual heating and consequent release of oil.

    During the last few decades Institutions, International organizations and producers have made a major effort to increase consumers’ awareness of Extra Virgin Olive Oil culture, taste quality and health benefits. Simultaneously, the olive oil industry had increased its interest in quality production, fruit selection and differentiation of characteristics in order to satisfy the widest range of consumers and also gain new potential markets.

    As is deeply demonstrated in the literature, the fundamental basis to produce excellent olive oil quality and differentiate his characteristics, are in the olive fruit and in particular in healthy fruit at the right stage of ripeness at harvesting. That knowledge helps to move ahead of time year by year the milling period with respect to the usual traditional beliefs of the past. Looking at quality production and moving ahead of time the mill processing period brings the harvest climate closer and closer to the outdoor autumn temperature as opposed to the traditional outdoor winter temperature.

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    Rating: 3.6/10 (295 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +11 (from 113 votes)
    Thermal conditioning of olive paste comes into the mill contributing to the increase in quality parameters of extra virgin olive oil. The Thermal Conditioning Module consists in a highly efficient tubular heat exchanger installed in the line after the crusher, able to bring down... 
    Read More →