Daily Archives: August 30, 2015

  • South Texas is a good place to grow olive trees

    One economist argues that South Texas could be a sweet spot for another kind of oil — olive oil.

    “One of the opportunities for diversification in South Texas includes olive oil production. It’s a good place to grow olive trees and the U.S. imports 95 percent of the olive oil that it consumes,” said Thomas Tunstael, professor at the University of Texas at San Antonio Institute for Economic Development.

    The Eagle Ford Shale is where there was an oil and gas drilling bonanza and is just north of the Valley, and the largely untapped Burgos Basin is to the south in Mexico. Tunstael was one of half a dozen analysts who explored the future of energy in South Texas at a conference hosted by the Rio Grande Valley Hispanic Chamber of Commerce on Thursday afternoon.

    The United States imports about 300,000 tons of olive oil each year. Domestic production is largely lacking — at about 12,000 tons in 2013, according to the economic development institute. Since olives and the production of olive oil typically has a higher profit margin for an agricultural product and the Valley has a similarly Mediterranean climate, it’s a potentially good fit, he said.

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    One economist argues that South Texas could be a sweet spot for another kind of oil — olive oil. “One of the opportunities for diversification in South Texas includes olive oil production. It’s a good place to grow olive trees and the U.S. imports 95 percent of the olive... 
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  • Study on the degree of knowledge and habits on olive oils among Spanish consumers

    The study “Trends in taste” developed by Consumolab (center inside Ainia specialized in the study of behavior and consumer preferences) shows that most valued foods are the less bitter (68% respondents). A preference that plays against EVOO, especially if we consider that 97.3% of respondents say that they are guided by taste when buying a product.

    The report data are based on an online survey done to consumers of the Consumolab panel, made up of people of both sexes aged between 18 and 60 years who have been segmented by age and gender. All of them have been asked for their preferences for sweet, salty, sour and bitter tastes.

    Thus, according to the report, sweet and salty flavors are the favorite of consumers. Specifically, 55% of Millennials (young adults between 20 and 35 years) choose sweet tastes as well as 47.5% of respondents belonging to Generation X (born between the early 60s and 80s). By gender, women are also more partisan of sweetness (51.2%). Finally, Baby Boomers (people born between the 40s and 60s) and men don’t like sweetness, but don’t choose bitter either, they prefer salty (50%).

    As for the preferences in acid and bitter tastes, both increase with age and are more liked by men than women (2.8% and 0.6%, respectively).

    Data were based on 383 surveys accomplished in the linear of the most important supermarkets in Madrid and Córdoba: Carrefour, Hipercor, Lidl and Mercadona.

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    The study “Trends in taste” developed by Consumolab (center inside Ainia specialized in the study of behavior and consumer preferences) shows that most valued foods are the less bitter (68% respondents). A preference that plays against EVOO, especially if we consider... 
    Read More →