Daily Archives: May 16, 2015

  • California Olive Oil Competition winners named

    After more than a month of waiting, results from the 10th California Olive Oil Competition are in.

    Presented by the Yolo County Fair, the competition was held on April 1, featuring 123 entries by 44 olive oil producers throughout the state. These products were sampled by nine judges, who took most of the day evaluating conventional, organic and flavored oils.

    This year, there were several new producers entering their olive oils.

    Being a California only event, the competition really showcased the many olive producers throughout the state as we had entries from as far north as Oroville and as far south as Santa Ynez and many towns in between.

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    The top winners for 2015 are as follows:

    Best of Show Delicate was won by California Olive Ranch from Artois with Other Blends “Miller’s Choice”. California Olive Ranch set out to craft a delicious and affordable American olive oil on par with the best imported olive oils. The Ranch has three of its own orchards and contract with a number of growers near the Sierra Nevada foothills of Northern California. The company is pioneering an innovative farming method wherein the olives are planted on trellis systems much like wine grapes. The olive bushes are irrigated with drip irrigation, reducing the amount of water used. California Olive Ranch olives go from branch to bottle in a few hours.

    The Best of Show Robust was won by Frate Sole Olive Oil from Woodland with “Tuscan Blend”. Frate Sole Olive also won the Best of Show Yolo County Resident. Frate Sole Olive Oil is a family operation committed to sustainable farming since 1999. The Mayer family grows 10 varieties of olives between Woodland and Davis. To ensure quality, the olives are hand-picked at their peak ripeness. The oil is cold-extracted within 24 hours, stored in steel tanks and bottled to meet demand. This is the Mayer’s seventh Yolo gold medal and the second time receiving the Best of Yolo County award.

    • Sutter Buttes Olive Oil from Sutter received the Best Citrus Flavored Oil with Meyer Lemon. Sutter Buttes Olive Oil designs products for the gourmet as well as for the general food lover. They believe that the use of simple, but exceptional ingredients, can transform ordinary into extraordinary. The blends for their infused Extra Virgin Olive Oils start with a base extracted from the Arbequina olive. Sutter Buttes takes perfectly ripe ingredients and locks in flavors so you can enjoy them year round.

    • The Best Other Flavored Oil with Jalapeno/Lime was won by Il Fiorello Olive Oil Company from Fairfield. Located in Suisun Valley, the Il Fiorello is a family owned Olive Farm that produces international award winning extra virgin olive oils and co-milled flavored oils. After a trip to Italy Ann and Mark Sievers came home and planted 100 olive trees at their home in Green Valley. They state “Good olives make Good oils” and have proven it having won over 60 medals in competitions since 2009.

    Best of Show Intermediate was won by California Gold Olive Oil Company from Oakdale with a Mono Cultivar “Estate Coratina” which went on to win The Patty Bogle-Roncoroni Award Best of the Best. This award is in honor of the late Patty Bogle-Roncoroni who was a Fair Board Director for several years. She was very instrumental in getting the Olive Oil Competition started at the Yolo County fair.

    Kevin Tazelaar, the owner of California Gold Olive Oil in Oakdale stated that he is an almond farmer with an olive oil hobby. He and his wife around 1998/99 had gone to an Art and Olive Festival.

    After tasting some really good olive oil, it inspired them to plant some olive trees. He remarked, fast forward to the present, “the hobby” now has about 10 acres tucked here and there around the almond trees.

    Tazelaar commented that in November of 2014 they decided that the Coratina crop looked sufficient enough to justify crushing it alone. His prize winning “Estate Coratina” — The Best of the Best.

    Article source
    On the featured picture by Jim Smith:
    Preparing their olive oil samples for tasting are, from left, Arden Kremer and John Hadley. The pair were among three teams of three judges each sampling some 123 types of olive oils in April.

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    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
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    After more than a month of waiting, results from the 10th California Olive Oil Competition are in. Presented by the Yolo County Fair, the competition was held on April 1, featuring 123 entries by 44 olive oil producers throughout the state. These products were sampled by nine... 
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  • Recipe: Olives, As You’ve Seldom Seen Them

    A little creativity spices up this Mediterranean stalwart for tasty cocktail nibbles.

    It’s often said that, as a general rule, most people don’t like change.
    We like things the way we like them, especially if we have been liking them that way for a long time.

    That’s especially true with food.

    Some of us (me!) are thrilled when a skilled restaurant chef changes up a recipe in a fun and delicious new way.

    Others (you know who you are!) cringe when their plate is brought to them and it’s obvious that the kitchen has “done something” to their traditional mashed potatoes. Or that there is a hunk of blue-cheesy butter melting over their perfectly good steak. (Me: “Yay!” Them: “Ugh.”)

    Sometimes change is for the better; it can bring out new flavours and textures you never knew were hiding in there.

    Playing with temperature is one way of changing things for the better. Some foods, especially those that you’ve probably always enjoyed cold, improve immensely when heated.

    NADINE’S GREAT RECIPES

    Hummus is one of those things. Usually you whiz it up in the food processor, store it in the fridge and pull it out when you need a quick appetizer. But instead of serving it cold, try scooping it into an earthenware dish, drizzling with a bit of olive oil and toasted pine nuts and baking it in the oven for about 20 minutes. You’ll wonder why everyone isn’t doing this.

    Grapes? Before you plunk down that boring cluster of grapes on a cheese plate, roast them in the oven until juicy and pile them atop crostini that has been smeared with some room temperature cheese, such as blue or brie. Mind. Blown.

    I’ve got lots more, but I’ll leave you with this quick little party nibble for hot, marinated olives. I still enjoy some olives cold, especially in a shot of icy cold vodka. But if the closest you’ve ever been to warm olives is on top of a pizza, these will knock your flip-flops off.

    Sometimes a little change will do you good.

    HOT SPICED OLIVES

    INGREDIENTS
    500 ml (2 cups) assorted olives with pits intact; a mixture of green and black are nice
    250 ml (1 cup) good-quality extra virgin olive oil
    3 large garlic cloves, smashed with the side of a knife
    15 ml (1 tbsp) fennel seeds
    2-3 bay leaves
    Couple sprigs of fresh thyme or 10 ml (2 tsp) dried thyme
    Several pinches chili flakes
    Generous grinding of cracked black pepper
    6 good-sized pieces of lemon rind; use a carrot peeler to shave nice, big pieces from the lemon

    To serve: Crusty bread, fresh lemon wedges

    DIRECTIONS
    Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Place everything in the skillet, but hold back three pieces of fresh lemon rind.

    Gently heat the olives and spiced oil until the oil begins to bubble gently around the olives. You don’t want the temperature to be so high that the olives fry or the lemon rind burns; it’s more like a slow, gentle simmer.

    Keep moving the olives around in the oil until the olive skins start to crinkle a bit and soften slightly. Take an olive out, let it cool a bit and taste. The pits will be hot, so be careful!

    Most olives will be salty enough, but if you think the olives and the oil could use a bit more salt and pepper, go ahead and season to your taste. Carefully tip olives and the oil into a nice clay serving dish.

    Fish out the spent lemon rind and tuck in a few fresh pieces here and there.

    Squeeze some fresh lemon juice over the top and serve with warm crusty bread and some nice, full-bodied wine.

    Alternative preparation: Place everything in a foil baking dish, cover with foil and place on the outdoor grill over low heat for about a half-hour.

    Recipe by NADINE FOWNES, source

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    A little creativity spices up this Mediterranean stalwart for tasty cocktail nibbles. It’s often said that, as a general rule, most people don’t like change. We like things the way we like them, especially if we have been liking them that way for a long time. That’s especially... 
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  • Olive oil wholesale prices, 15 may 2015

    In May recorded slightly lower the price on Italian origin extra virgin, as a result of little demand on the market. Recorded a further pricing rise of the olive oil originally from Greece and Spain.

    Marcello Scoccia / Vice Presidente e Capo panel ONAOO

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    Source

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    In May recorded slightly lower the price on Italian origin extra virgin, as a result of little demand on the market. Recorded a further pricing rise of the olive oil originally from Greece and Spain. Marcello Scoccia / Vice Presidente e Capo panel ONAOOSource VN:F [1.9.22_1171]please... 
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  • Potassium and sodium nutrition for olive trees

    Potassium (K) is an essential macronutrient shown to play a fundamental role in photosynthetic processes and may facilitate photoinhibition resistance.

    In some plant species, sodium (Na) can partially substitute for K. Although photosynthetic enhancement has been well established, the mechanisms by which K or Na affects photosynthesis are not fully understood. Olive (Olea europaea L.) trees were previously shown to benefit from Na nutrition when K is limiting.

    In order to study the effect of K and Na on photosynthetic performance, we measured gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in young olive trees supplied with either K, Na or no fertilizer, and subjected to manipulated levels of CO2, O2 and radiation.

    Light and CO2 response curves indicate substantially superior photosynthetic capacity of K-sufficient trees, while Na substitution generated intermediate results.

    The enhanced performance of K, and to a lesser extent, Na-supplied trees was found to be related mainly to modification of non-stomatal limitation. This indicates that K deficiency promotes inhibition of enzymatic-photochemical processes.

    Results indicate lower chlorophyll content and altered Rubisco activity as probable causes of photosynthetic impairment. Potassium deficiency was found to diminish photoprotection mechanisms due to reduced photosynthetic and photorespiratory capacity.

    The lower CO2 and O2 assimilation rate in K-deficient trees caused elevated levels of exited energy. Consequently, non-photochemical quenching, an alternative energy dispersion pathway, was increased. Nonetheless, K-deficient trees were shown to suffer from photodamage to photosystem-II. Sodium replacement considerably diminished the negative effect of K deficiency on photoprotection mechanisms.

    The overall impact of K and Na nutrition plays down any indirect effect on stomatal limitation and rather demonstrates the centrality of these elements in photochemical processes of photosynthesis and photoprotection.
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    Potassium (K) is an essential macronutrient shown to play a fundamental role in photosynthetic processes and may facilitate photoinhibition resistance. In some plant species, sodium (Na) can partially substitute for K. Although photosynthetic enhancement has been well established,... 
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  • This is how You should be storing Olive Oil tips from the kitchen

    Where do you store your olive oil? It’s tempting — and awfully convenient – to store oil right next to the stove, within arm’s reach, but is that really the best spot?

    Olive oil is a pantry staple that we use almost daily, and whether you have a standard work-a-day oil, or fancy bottle of extra-virgin, the key to making sure it lasts is proper storage. So, now that you know the difference between regular and extra virgin olive oil, it’s time to make sure you’re storing it properly.

    3 Things to Keep Away from Olive Oil

    Olive oil has three enemies: oxygen, light, and heat. When exposed to those elements, the oil will turn rancid more quickly. The best way to prevent this (and extend your oil’s shelf life) is proper storage.

    The Right Way to Store Olive Oil

    When it comes to storing olive oil, there are two things to consider: where you store it and how you store it.

    Where to Store Olive Oil

    Olive oil should be stored in a cool, dry, dark cupboard, away from the heat and light. Choose a spot in the kitchen that’s away from the oven. The best temperature for storing oil is 57 degrees, though room temperature, or 70 degrees, is also okay.

    How: For a longer shelf life, don’t store oil in direct sunlight.

    How to Store Olive Oil

    Store olive oil in a dark-colored glass bottle, which helps to keep out the light, or in a stainless steel container. This will protect the oil from exposure to sunlight. If you buy your olive oil in a large tin, consider pouring smaller amounts in a dark-colored bottle to use as you need it.

    Avoid storing oil in plastic containers because chemicals from the plastic can seep into the oil. Also avoid reactive metal containers, like iron or copper, which can cause a reaction with the oil, making it unsafe.

    It’s also important to limit the oil’s exposure to oxygen. Over time, oxygen can degrade the quality of the oil, eventually turning it rancid. Use oil soon after buying it, and always keep it stored with a cap or lid.

    Do you have a favorite container for your olive oil? Live us message below, Thank You!

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    Where do you store your olive oil? It’s tempting — and awfully convenient – to store oil right next to the stove, within arm’s reach, but is that really the best spot? Olive oil is a pantry staple that we use almost daily, and whether you have a standard work-a-day... 
    Read More →