Daily Archives: April 10, 2015

  • Rural women and olive oil – what a great mix!

    Where to house the new community olive press was the big topic of conversation when Gendie Somerville-Ryan, President of Awana Rural Women on Great Barrier Island, met Carol and Trevor Rendle of Barrier Olive Growers Ltd for coffee. Awana Rural Women, a branch of Rural Women NZ, owns its own premises – a hall and a garage. The garage was undergoing a major upgrade and would make the perfect place for the olive press. All it took was a cup of coffee and a chat and the olive press had a new home.

    “Awana Rural Women activities encourage community cooperation and development and what better way to demonstrate this than to help promote economic growth through horticulture,” said Mrs Somerville-Ryan. “Our facilities are centrally located, of a high standard and well-known around Great Barrier Island. Housing the olive press is very much in line with our philosophy of helping the community to help itself through education, personal development and building community capacity. It’s a win-win for everyone.”

    The community olive press was officially opened by Hon Nikki Kaye, MP for Great Barrier (and Auckland Central). Hon Ms Kaye acknowledged the perseverance and hard work of everyone involved in getting this project not only off the ground but up and running. “The reason this cooperative approach has worked on the Barrier is that so many people contribute. The olive press is important for economic reasons – it gives people another option to stay on the Island,” said Hon Nikki Kaye. “Awana Rural Women have been the backbone of the community and it is fitting they have been part of this project.”

    A recent survey showed that there were over 600 olive trees already fruiting on Great Barrier Island but developing an industry from the olives is impractical when the fruit has to be shipped off Island for pressing. Barrier Olive Growers has purchased the press and growers will be able to press their fruit for a nominal charge – hopefully kick-starting an olive oil “export” industry for the Barrier.

    Awana Rural Women can see a great future for Barrier olive oil, from an olive oil festival to an olive picking and pressing experience. However, the first step is to get the 2015 vintage harvested and pressed – and enjoyed by those on the Barrier and beyond.

    Article source

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    Where to house the new community olive press was the big topic of conversation when Gendie Somerville-Ryan, President of Awana Rural Women on Great Barrier Island, met Carol and Trevor Rendle of Barrier Olive Growers Ltd for coffee. Awana Rural Women, a branch of Rural Women... 
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  • Easter Recipe: Grilled Leg of Lamb with Olive Oil

    Ingredients

    • 1 4–5-lb. boneless leg of lamb
    • 1 lemon, halved
    • 4 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
    • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
    • 2 tbsp. minced fresh rosemary leaves
    • 10 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

    Preparation

    1 Unroll the leg of lamb fat side down onto a work surface. Using a knife, make ¼” slashes all over the inside of the leg. Squeeze the lemon over both sides of the lamb and drizzle with olive oil. Season generously with salt and pepper and rub lamb with rosemary and garlic. Transfer lamb to a parchment paper–lined rimmed baking sheet and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to overnight.

    2 Let lamb come to room temperature. Build a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill or heat a gas grill to medium-high. (Alternatively, arrange a rack 5″ from the broiler element and heat oven to broil.) Spread lamb over grill grate and cook, turning occasionally, until browned and cooked to desired temperature, about 15–18 minutes for medium rare. Transfer to a cutting board and let sit for 5 minutes. Following the seams of fat and muscle, cut lamb into 5 large pieces. To serve, thinly slice each piece against the grain and transfer to a serving platter.

    About The Recipe
    Andreas Xerakia, a Greek-born resident of New York City (pictured below with his family), slow-roasts a whole lamb every year for his family’s celebratory Easter dinner. Here’s a smaller, more streamlined version of that dish.

    recipe source

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    Ingredients1 4–5-lb. boneless leg of lamb 1 lemon, halved 4 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 2 tbsp. minced fresh rosemary leaves 10 cloves garlic, roughly choppedPreparation 1 Unroll the leg of lamb fat side down onto a... 
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  • World Olive Oil Market in the early months of 2014/15

    In the first four months of the 2014/15 crop year (October 2014–January 2015), the figures for trade in olive oil and olive pomace oil in the countries listed in the table show year-on-year import increases for Brazil (+7 pc), Japan (+6 pc) and Australia (+2 pc) but decreases for Canada, China and the United States (−4 pceach).

    Import data for Russia are only available for the first three months of the year and point to a 13 pc rise. The figures for December 2014 and January 2015 show large decreases in imports compared with the same months a season earlier. Specifically, season-on-season imports were down in December in Russia, in December and January in China and the United States, and in January in Australia and Canada.
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    It will be necessary to keep track of developments over the coming months to see whether these decreases are one-off or whether they are linked to the lower supply on the world market caused by this season’s small harvest and higher prices. On the other hand, in January Brazil more than made up for the decrease in imports recorded in
    December.

    The January 2015 data were not available for the EU at the time of publication but the October–December 2014 data show an increase of 18 pc in intra-EU acquisitions and of 8 pc in extra-EU imports compared with the same period a season earlier. Owing to the hefty drop in Spain and Italy’s output, imports from outside the EU will probably be considerably higher than last season, particularly imports from Tunisia where the harvest is much higher than last year.

    Source: International Olive Council MARKET NEWSLETTER No 92 – March 2015

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    In the first four months of the 2014/15 crop year (October 2014–January 2015), the figures for trade in olive oil and olive pomace oil in the countries listed in the table show year-on-year import increases for Brazil (+7 pc), Japan (+6 pc) and Australia (+2 pc) but decreases... 
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  • Spotlight on World Table Olive Consumption - IOC report

    Over the past 25 years, world table olive consumption has seen a 2.7-fold increase, rising by 169.4 pc from 1990/91 to 2014/15. This trend is illustrated in Chart 1 where it can be seen that consumption has increased the most in the member countries of the IOC, which are the top producers.

    In some cases, consumption has climbed on the back of sharp increases in production, for instance in Egypt where table olive consumption has soared from 11 000 t in 1990/91 to 320 000 t in 2014/15, or in Algeria and Turkey where it has gone up from 14 000 t to 215 000 t and from 110 000 t to 350 000 t, respectively.

    Consumption has risen on a smaller scale in the rest of the IOC membership. Chart 2 reports annual per capita consumption of table olives in 2013. Albania leads the ranking with 14.8kg/capita/year; total table olive consumption in this country amounts to 41 000 t while it has a population of no more than 2 774 000 people.
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    Far behind comes Lebanon (5.6 kg), followed by Turkey, Syria, Algeria and Egypt (between 4.0 kg and 4.7 kg), Jordan (3.6 kg), Israel (3.0 kg), Libya (2.3 kg), Tunisia (2.0 kg) and Uruguay (1.2kg). The rest (Morocco, Argentina, Iraq and Iran, in descending order) consume between 1 and 0.6 kg of table olives per annum.

    During the same time span (1990/91–2014/15), consumption in the European Union increased by 81.5 pc from 346 400 t to 629 000 t. Annual per capita consumption is reported in Chart 3. As can be observed, Spain, the world’s top producer is also the leading consumer (4.0 kg), followed by Malta (3.8 kg), Cyprus (3.0 kg) and Italy (2.4 kg).
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    Further down the ranking are countries with a per capita consumption between 1.8 kg and 1.0kg (Bulgaria, Greece, Luxembourg and France, listed in descending order), between 0.9 and 0.5 kg (Romania, Czech Republic, Belgium, Sweden, Portugal, United Kingdom, Germany, Austria and Croatia) and not more than 0.4 kg (Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Lithuania, Latvia, Ireland, Poland, Netherlands and Hungary).
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    Lastly, Chart 4 plots annual per capita consumption of table olives in non-IOC member countries. The top four consumers are also producers and consume between 1.9 kg and 1.3 kg (Palestine, Chile, Saudi Arabia and Peru). Next come Australia and Canada with 0.9 kg and 0.8 kg respectively; Switzerland and the United States with 0.7 kg each; Brazil and Russia, each with 0.5 kg although total table olive consumption has risen steeply in these two countries, this is not mirrored in per capita consumption owing to the size of their population); and Mexico with 0.1 kg.

    Source: International Olive Council MARKET NEWSLETTER No 92 – March 2015

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    Over the past 25 years, world table olive consumption has seen a 2.7-fold increase, rising by 169.4 pc from 1990/91 to 2014/15. This trend is illustrated in Chart 1 where it can be seen that consumption has increased the most in the member countries of the IOC, which are the... 
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