Monthly Archives: March 2015

  • Olive Oil Export marketing is not just a process of sourcing buyers

    Export marketing is not just a process of sourcing buyers, and approaching them with the expectation of export orders, but conducting step by step procedures with a well-planned strategic marketing plan to acquire rapid success and profitable export sales growth.

    Strategic marketing plan. What is it?

    It’s a set of fundamental steps when followed will lead to success in Exporting your products.

    Step-1 : Identify your target market

    There are many markets, but identifying the right one(s) could easily get export orders from these markets. You can begin identify the target markets by using the interactive flow chart to monitor the demand trends for any product or service worldwide.
    For simplicity I present the interactive map for Olive oil, to monitor which countries are looking for suppliers in which countries, with search volumes displayed country by country. Europages.com
    http://www.europages.co.uk/cartographie/Olive%20oil.html

    Step-2 : Develop Export Marketing strategies

    After having identified the ideal market(s), the next step is to develop the right Export Marketing Strategies in accordance to the target markets and always taking into account your competitor(s).

    • Enter the markets of demand
    • Position your product accordingly
    • Develop products or services that satisfy buyers’ needs
    • Offer advantage pricing
    • Sell private label or your own brand
    • Supply buyer’s requirements or ready stock
    • Promote your company to create awareness

    If steps 1 & 2 have been met, you have an advantage in entering the right markets and obtaining export sales growth.

    Step-3 : Prepare Marketing Communication tools

    Create appealing marketing communication tools like Company Profile, Product Catalog, Brochures/informative leaflets, Multilingual Website creation and for example
    if your target market is France your website cannot be in Greek, under construction, or no land-line but only a cell number because its reflects a negative image of your size, your potential, your production capabilities to your prospects who have landed in your website.

    So in other words, your marketing communication tools is a reflection of your company so it’s imperative to have them professionally designed with quality images, informative content of your product(s) and your company profile.

    Step-4 : Promotion

    A major role in the export marketing success with its main objective to create awareness to B2B buyers of what you are and what you offer by promoting the right message, to the right markets.

    An excellent source are B2B portals like EUROPAGES.COM with global exposure and creating awareness amongst prospects to be found exactly where they are searching for your products.
    B2B websites give you instant access to new export markets by providing an ongoing source of continuous leads at a fraction of the cost of any other advertising solution.
    Exhibitions, Trade shows as well, is a great promotional strategy because it generates live contact with B2B buyers, its only catch is that it’s expensive to follow.

    Today, more and more prospects use the internet to search products, suppliers, so it’s the ideal place to get a head start.

    Step-5 : Generate Export Inquiries

    Success in export Marketing begins with generating export inquiries from prospects and communicating and negotiating professionally with them to get them interested in your products and have them send export inquiries.
    So contact them by offering competitive advantages.

    Before closing I’d like you to ask yourself….
    “Why should they buy your product”
    If you can’t think of 3 good reasons to engage your prospects/customers to buy your products you should be researching.

    Exporting is not a piece of cake, just because we have a great product, it requires dedication, commitment and it’s a continuous process in an ever changing global market.

    Article by Anastacia Markaki, source

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    Export marketing is not just a process of sourcing buyers, and approaching them with the expectation of export orders, but conducting step by step procedures with a well-planned strategic marketing plan to acquire rapid success and profitable export sales growth. Strategic marketing... 
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  • Why consumers should be wary of 'too' cheap olive oil?

    British shoppers have been warned to beware of counterfeit olive oil – as criminal gangs exploit a disastrous Italian harvest by selling potentially dangerous bootleg bottles.

    A senior Italian food fraud investigator told that he has already seen evidence that criminals are moving into olive oil production and distribution.

    Consumers should be particularly wary of olive oil that appears “too cheap to be true”, experts said. Fake oil produced in unhygienic conditions could put Britons at increased risk of E.coli and salmonella.

    The incentive for fraud has increased because the woeful olive harvest has left a shortage of the fruit required to make genuine oil – while the resulting rising price has increased the profits that can be made from selling fake bottles.

    Consumers should be wary of ‘too’ cheap oil

    “Organised criminals are going into it rapidly. We estimate that there will be an increase in criminal interest in this field,” the Italian investigator said.

    He said it was likely that some of the counterfeit product could end up in the UK, which is a big consumer of Italian olive oil. The Italian and British authorities are in discussions about how best to tackle the threat, he added.

    “The criminals have international links and are able to shift this product overseas where other criminals will supply it. There are some networks that are able to supply Italian restaurants overseas, so there is a threat from that,” he said.

    Olive oil prices have doubled in recent weeks as output tumbled by nearly a third to its lowest level in 15 years. Italy’s pre-eminent growing region, Puglia, was hit particularly hard after millions of olive trees were infected with a deadly microbe.

    In one type of the fraud, the counterfeit olive oil is relatively harmless, although it is illegal and dupes the consumer out of their cash. In these cases, “Italian extra virgin olive oil” is produced using older, inferior oils from other countries and passed off as a fresh, top-of-the-range product from Italy.

    But another version of the fraud poses a far greater risk. In this case, vegetable oil is presented as olive oil by blending it with chlorophyll – for colour – and beta-carotene for flavour.

    The rising cost of olives could push up oil prices

    This poses a danger for people with allergies to chlorophyll – who can develop symptoms such as chest pains and rashes. There is also a risk from the poor hygiene standards employed by the bootleggers, the Italian investigator warns. “It’s not just a question of sub-standard products; it’s a question of health and safety. They do not respect hygiene requirements for food production. They often work in garages and the basements of houses, so it is not a clean place and you can get bacteria contamination,” he said.

    The best way for consumers and restaurant buyers to determine whether olive oil is counterfeit is to look at the price. Olive oil comes in so many different varieties and qualities of pressings that it is difficult to compare prices, but broadly it has varied from about £4 to £6.50 a litre at the supermarkets over the past two years.

    Experts predict that the rising cost of olives will push up the price of olive oil by about a quarter once it has fed through into the retail system – making any litre bottle of olive oil for much less than £5 look suspicious.

    Eoghan Daly, of the Institute of Food Safety Integrity and Protection, said: “They could be mixing in a farm building where they could be introducing E.coli and salmonella risks into the olive oil through cross-contamination. Or in an industrial place, where there could be all sorts of hazardous chemicals.

    “And there could be physical contamination through foreign objects such as bits of glass.”

    The healthy eating trends of 2015

    He stressed he was outlining a worst-case scenario.

    “The UK is a significant consumer of olive oil with a supply chain running directly from Italy to the UK. It’s a reality that this is happening,” added Mr Daly.

    He said the counterfeit product is much more likely to find its way into Britain’s catering and restaurant trade and small, local shops than the big retailers.

    Mr Daly is keen for the fraudsters to be found and punished as soon as possible. “If they get away with it, maybe it will be mineral oil rather than vegetable oil they use next time,” he warned.

    Know your olives: Facts about the fruit

    * Olive trees and oil production can be traced back to the ancient Syrian city-state of Ebla in around 2400BC.

    * About 70 per cent of the world’s olives are grown in Spain and Italy. Greece, Portugal, Morocco and Tunisia produce most of the rest.

    * The harvest in Puglia, southern Italy has been hit hardest in this year’s bad crop, down by more than 40 per cent.

    * Olive oil is produced by pressing whole olives and is used in cooking, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and soaps.

    * The oil is rich in vitamins and energy and regarded by many as the healthiest of the edible oils. It is used across the world as a dressing, for frying, on bread and in baking.

    * Extra virgin olive oil is the purest form. It’s made by purely mechanical means. It is the only cooking oil made without chemicals and industrial refining.

    * Olive oil started appearing in British kitchens in the 1970s when people adopted parts of the Mediterranean diet.

    Source

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    British shoppers have been warned to beware of counterfeit olive oil – as criminal gangs exploit a disastrous Italian harvest by selling potentially dangerous bootleg bottles. A senior Italian food fraud investigator told that he has already seen evidence that criminals are... 
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  • Anuga FoodTec 2015: excellent registration figures - from Germany and abroad

    Registration figures for the seventh Anuga FoodTec, the international supplier trade fair for the food and beverage industry, from 24 to 27 March 2015 in Cologne, have been outstanding.

    Alongside countless market leaders from Germany and abroad, many small and medium-sized companies will also be appearing at Anuga FoodTec.

    In keeping with the motto “One for all – all in one” Anuga FoodTec will represent the entire production chain, divided into the areas Food Processing, Food Packaging, Food Safety and Services & Solutions.

    Individual topics, such as suppliers for the meat industry, are showing remarkable growth. As an overarching theme, the broad term “Resource efficiency” will be emphasized across all areas of the trade fair and also represented within the supporting programme.

    Almost 1,500 suppliers from around 40 countries and 43,000 trade visitors from around 130 countries are expected at the trade fair

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    Koelnmesse GmbH
    Messeplatz 1
    50679 Cologne, Deutschland
    Tel. +49 1806 578 866 Fax +49 221 821 99-1020
    anugafoodtec@visitor.koelnmesse.de www.anugafoodtec.com

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    Registration figures for the seventh Anuga FoodTec, the international supplier trade fair for the food and beverage industry, from 24 to 27 March 2015 in Cologne, have been outstanding. Alongside countless market leaders from Germany and abroad, many small and medium-sized companies... 
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  • Olive oil gets preference over canola oil in India

    Companies involved in selling branded cooking oils are shying away from building packaged FMCG brands in canola oil due to low consumer awareness, unsteady imports and labelling issues.

    Adani Wilmar and Cargill Foods, for example, would rather focus on building brands in the premium olive oil segment in their FMCG business than enter the canola oil category despite its health benefits and lower pricing.

    Difficult to brand

    Angshu Mallik, COO, Adani Wilmar, said, “Almost 90 per cent of canola oil imports get blended with mustard oil and imports are erratic in the canola oil category due to the labelling issues. As a result it is difficult to build a canola oil brand in India. We would rather import olive oil from Spain or Italy for our FMCG portfolio under our existing brands than enter the canola oil category.”

    Last year, the Food Safety and Standards Authority (FSSAI) had stopped the import of vegetable oils under any particular brand name insisting that every container of canola oil should get labelled as “imported rapeseed low erucic” acid oil.

    Rising consumption

    Canola oil is one of the largest exports from Canada and the Canola Council of Canada has been trying to convince the Government that canola is different from the oil extracted from conventional rapeseed. Vegetable oil consumption in the country is increasing by about 400,000 tonnes (3.6 per cent) per year and the Canola Council of Canada wants to tap into this opportunity.

    But given the labelling norms controversy, players such as Cargill Foods, is avoiding the canola oil category.

    Adulteration issues

    “Even though 2 lakh tonnes of canola oil gets imported, most of it gets adulterated with mustard oil. We would rather focus on growing our olive oil portfolio with Leonardo as an FMCG brand,” says Siraj A Chaudhry, Chairman, Cargill India.

    Players who continue to be in the canola oil market, Dalmia Continental for example, have moved the courts to revoke the labelling norms.

    “Commodity players do not want to invest behind the development of canola oil and get hassled by the FSSAI norms for this category. Now that we have an interim order from the Bombay High Court, we are using the name of canola oil in our labelling since we do not want to confuse consumers,” said VN Dalmia, Chairman, Dalmia Continental and owner of Hudson Canola oil.

    RPS Kohli, Director, Jivo Wellness and President Canola Council of India, said that commodity players do not want to jump into a category which has low volumes and awareness.

    Playing on health part

    “Sales for canola oil have grown by word of mouth rather than big budget advertising in the olive oil category,” said Kohli.

    While the canola oil category is pegged at ₹150 crore, the olive oil segment is a ₹600-crore market. “Olive oil is perceived to be healthier oil than canola and we will enhance presence in the segment with our brands like Leonardo and Gemini as we are growing at 20 per cent which is much ahead of category growth,” said Chaudhry.

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    Companies involved in selling branded cooking oils are shying away from building packaged FMCG brands in canola oil due to low consumer awareness, unsteady imports and labelling issues. Adani Wilmar and Cargill Foods, for example, would rather focus on building brands in the... 
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  • The South African "SA Olive Competition"

    The SA Olive Competition is held annually to award the finest of that year’s vintage. Entries are blind judged over a period of three days.

    ”The South African consumer is increasingly aware of the high quality of locally produced olive oils and keeps a close eye on the results of this competition,” says Andries Rabie, prior SA Olive chairperson.

    2014 AWARDS
    The competition, was in its ninth year, attracted 76 locally-produced extra virgin olive oils. A total of 17 exceptional extra virgin oils received gold medals in three categories – 3 for Delicate, 8 for Medium and 6 for Intense style oils.

    WHAT THE SEAL MEANS:
    1. The content is 100% South African.
    2. The year of harvest is prominently displayed, indicating the freshness of the oil.
    3. The producer is committed to the standards set in the SA Olive Codes of Practice and based on international quality standards.
    4. Labelling is honest and transparent.


    About SA Olive

    SA Olive is an association representing the common interests of the South African olive industry. SA Olive members consist of olive growers, olive oil producers, table olive producers, tree nurseries and olive importers.
    SA Olive is committed to supporting a healthy future, i.e. ensuring a healthy future for its members, healthy growth and development for the industry and a healthy lifestyle for all South Africans.

    20150319-185508.jpg

    Postal address: P O Box 357, Paarl, 7620
    Physical address: 258 Main Street, Paarl
    Tel nr: 021-870 2900
    Fax nr: 021-870 2915
    Contact the Manager, Vittoria Jooste, at
    manager@saolive.co.za
    Contact the Chair, Nick Wilkinson, at chairman@saolive.co.za
    Contact the Secretariat at info@saolive.co.za
    Read more here.

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    The SA Olive Competition is held annually to award the finest of that year’s vintage. Entries are blind judged over a period of three days. ”The South African consumer is increasingly aware of the high quality of locally produced olive oils and keeps a close eye on the... 
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  • The EU has recommended that 11million Italian olive trees be cut down

    Comes after a deadly microbe spread by insects was discovered in them and fears that unless they are destroyed it will spread to other areas of Italy. Some of the trees that might have to be chopped down are centuries old.

    The price of olive oil is expected to rocket after the EU ordered the felling of millions of trees infected with a deadly microbe.

    Brussels has recommended that about 11million olive trees in southern Italy, many centuries old, be chopped down.

    They have been infected with Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterium spread by an aphid. The disease, first identified in the Americas has already wiped out a million trees in Salento, southern Puglia.

    Olive trees in southern Puglia in Italy. The EU has recommended that 11million trees be cut down after they were found to be infected with a deadly microbe

    It is feared that unless drastic action is taken to fell the groves, the bacterium will spread to other olive-producing regions of Italy such as Tuscany and Umbria, and even to other Mediterranean countries.

    Xylella fastidiosa can also infect vines, almond trees and other crops.

    Puglia, a region in the heel of Italy, produces about 11million tons of olives a year, more than a third of the national crop, and they are used to make some of the country’s best oils.

    If the trees are destroyed, it could effect production and send the prices of olive oil soaring

    The initial area to be culled is 20,000 acres – about 30 sq miles – between Lecce to Brindisi. It contains around 11million trees, according to Unaprol, the largest consortium of growers.

    Many of Italy’s oldest olive groves, some dating back 500 years, have been infected by the bacterium, which causes plants to shrivel, leaving them incapable of bearing fruit.

    The effect on production will mean shortages in the supply of olive oil and is likely to lead to higher prices for shoppers in Britain and around the world.

    Vytenis Andriukaitis, the European Commissioner for Food Safety and Security, said he was ‘profoundly concerned by the gravity of the situation’.

    He added: ‘We have to take decisive measures with immediate effect. Naturally it is very painful for the growers but it is necessary to remove all the affected trees, it is the most effective measure.’

    A committee will meet on Thursday next week to rubber stamp the directive, which growers fear will create a desert in the area as it will not be possible to replant it with olive groves.

    Popular singer and olive producer Albano Carrisi said culling the trees is ‘cruel’ and ‘useless’. He said: ‘Do not disfigure our beautiful Puglia.

    Puglia without olives is like the Vatican without cardinals’. Gianni Cantele, president of one Puglia producers’ consortium, Coldiretti, said it was ‘a natural disaster’.

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    Comes after a deadly microbe spread by insects was discovered in them and fears that unless they are destroyed it will spread to other areas of Italy. Some of the trees that might have to be chopped down are centuries old. The price of olive oil is expected to rocket after the... 
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  • A journey into 'Virgin Territory' and recipe: Soupy Spanish Rice with Clams and EVOO

    American consumers spend hundreds of millions of dollars each year on extra-virgin olive oil alone, and we are generally on the same page about the notion that it’s a healthful fat. Yet we know less about it, and about olive oil in general, than we should. Only one in four of us is aware that the oil does not improve with age, and 85 percent of us think “light olive oil” has fewer calories than other olive oils, according to a recent study. (For the record, the designation refers to refined olive oil with little aroma or flavor.)

    The research results are reason enough for Nancy Harmon Jenkins to have written “Virgin Territory: Exploring the World of Olive Oil” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, February 2015). More significantly, the respected author and historian is passionate about the subject, and clearly fascinated by it. She has spent four decades cooking, learning, sampling, touring, harvesting her own olives and trying to vanquish misperceptions about the oil. (Yes, Virginia, you can fry in extra-virgin olive oil.)

    This is her seventh cookbook, with much to offer, including her well-written, mostly Mediterranean-based recipes. There are the expected Great Moments in olive oil history, because Jenkins is recognized as an expert in the field and likes to share information. The chapters on the process of making oil and the science around the ingredient are in layman’s terms.

    Her explanation of why we should care about identifying what is truly “extra-virgin” is presented without hyperbole. Such oil is extracted and processed without chemical treatment and refining; it contains no more than 0.8 grams of oleic acid per 100 grams of oil, and it must be free of defective flavors and aromas. It does not necessarily come from a first pressing. Its combination of polyphenols is said to be the most healthful of all olive oils.

    Jenkins’ bottom line: Rely on taste more than labels.

    To that end, she walks readers through how to taste olive oils and the language with which to describe them, preferably at a venue where you can sample more than one or two at a time. Beyond calling for extra-virgin olive oil in a preface to the recipes — a matter of style that might not get picked up by less-careful readers — Jenkins does not specify particular types of olive oils for certain dishes. But she does list reliable sources and brands, including Costco’s Kirkland Signature Extra-Virgin Olive Oil and Trader Joe’s Kalamata Extra-Virgin Olive Oil from Greece.

    One oil for cooking and one for finishing are all that is needed in a discerning home cook’s kitchen. Proper storage is more crucial, she says, meaning keep it out of the refrigerator and away from the heat of a nearby stove or microwave.

    RECIPE: SOUPY SPANISH RICE WITH CLAMS with extra-virgin olive oil

    In this version of the Catalan dish, the clams are cooked separately in their shells to keep sand or grit from settling into the rice.
    The recipe calls for an unsmoked Spanish paprika; if you can’t find it, use Aleppo pepper or piment d’Espelette instead.
    Serve with crusty bread.

    Make ahead: The saffron needs to steep for at least 1 hour.

    Pinch saffron threads INGREDIENTS:
    1/2 cup warm water, plus 2 cups boiling water
    1-1/2 pounds shell-on littleneck or Manila clams
    1 to 1-1/2 cups dry white wine, or more as needed
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 large onion, chopped
    1 pound peeled, chopped tomatoes
    3 cloves garlic, crushed
    1 sweet red bell pepper, seeded and diced
    1 sweet green bell pepper, seeded and diced
    3 sprigs thyme
    1/2 teaspoon mild Spanish paprika (pimenton; see headnote)
    3/4 cup short-grain rice, such as Valencia or Arborio
    Sea salt
    1/2 cup minced flat-leaf parsley

    DIRECTIONS:
    Combine the saffron and the 1/2 cup of warm water in a small stain-proof bowl; steep for at least 1 hour.

    Discard any clams that do not close when gently tapped. Place the remaining clams in a large saucepan. Add enough wine to fill to about 1 inch at the bottom of the pot. Cook over medium heat just until the clams open, transferring them to a bowl as soon as they do. Discard any clams that fail to open.

    Strain the cooking liquid through a double or triple layer of cheesecloth into a small saucepan to remove any grit. If the clams are grit-free, leave some of them in their shells (it makes a nice presentation when the dish is ready); otherwise, shuck the clams and keep them warm in the strained cooking liquid over low heat.

    Heat the oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the onion, tomatoes, garlic and peppers; cook for 6 to 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes start to dissolve and soften. Add the saffron and its soaking water, then stir in the thyme and paprika.

    Add the reserved clam cooking liquid; cook for 5 minutes, then add the rice, the 2 cups of boiling water and 1/8 to ¼ teaspoon of the salt. Cook, uncovered, for about 15 minutes; the rice should soften yet still be fairly firm.

    Stir in the cooked clams; cook for about 5 minutes, then remove from the heat. Cover and let sit for 5 minutes, allowing the rice to finish cooking. Discard the thyme sprigs, then stir in the parsley. Serve warm.

    Nutrition per serving: 410 calories, 20 grams protein, 31 grams carbohydrates, 19 grams fat, 3 grams saturated fat, 35 milligrams cholesterol, 740 milligrams sodium, 3 grams dietary fiber, 5 grams sugar

    Servings: 6

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    American consumers spend hundreds of millions of dollars each year on extra-virgin olive oil alone, and we are generally on the same page about the notion that it’s a healthful fat. Yet we know less about it, and about olive oil in general, than we should. Only one in four... 
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  • The olive oil market has shown significant growth in recent years in India

    The domestic market has grown from 1,000 tonnes in 2003 to 12,000 tonnes in 2013, according to estimates by the Indian Olive Association. “For a market that consumes about 12 million tonnes of edible oils, olive oil’s share works out to just 0.1 per cent.

    The edible olive oil market has been growing at 45-50 per cent over the last five years, with significant growth in Tier II markets. We’re seeing a lot of traction in Tier-II cities with growth doubling year-on-year,” stated Rajneesh Bhasin, president, Indian Olive Association and managing director, Borges India.

    Borges India commands a 35-50 per cent market share at present. “Our innovations like the ‘extra light’ olive oil sub-category, a refined variant, introduced in 2010, has helped us win a considerable consumer share. Initially, the product category was around 3,000 tonnes in India predominantly driven by the massage oil, but over the years, the category has grown to 11,000 tonnes, with a major shift, almost 70 per cent, being edible olive oil,” he said.

    Believing Borges India to be a market leader in the edible olive oil space in the country today, Bhasin is confident to take it to 40 to 50,000 tonnes in the next five years. “The product category has been growing at a CAGR of 30-40 per cent so far.

    Even if the market maintains a minimum 25 per cent CAGR growth, we will be able to achieve the targeted growth. We are aiming to increase the consumption by at least one per cent in the next decade,” he replied. He also informed that Borges India is set for a Rs 100 crore turnover by 2015.

    Commenting on the initiatives taken by the Indian Olive Association, Bhasin stated, “Due to the persistent lobbying efforts of the Indian Olive Association, the duty on extra virgin olive oil has come down from 450 per cent few years back to 0-two per cent and of refined olive oils to seven-eight per cent.

    Presently, table olives are at a disadvantage because of higher duty, and the association is working on it as well.” Established in 1896, Borges Mediterranean Group is into all the key Mediterranean food categories with subsidiaries in eight countries. Borges India, established in 2009, is a fully owned subsidiary of Borges Mediterranean Group.

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    The domestic market has grown from 1,000 tonnes in 2003 to 12,000 tonnes in 2013, according to estimates by the Indian Olive Association. “For a market that consumes about 12 million tonnes of edible oils, olive oil’s share works out to just 0.1 per cent. The edible olive... 
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  • San Joaquin Valley Olive Oil Competition calling all olive oil makers

    The Big Fresno Fair is launching its inaugural San Joaquin Valley Olive Oil Competition. The competition, in partnership with the California Olive Oil Council, is open to all olive oil producers in the State of California with olive oil made from the most recent olive harvest. There will be two classes for entries: Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Flavored Olive Oil. Awards will be given out for Gold and Silver medals in each category, as well as one overall “Best of Show.” Entries are now being accepted and the deadline to enter is May 8, 2015.

    Producers may submit multiple entries under one category but may not submit a particular entry to more than one category. All entries must be available for commercial sale at the time of submittal. Judging will be held on May 21 and 22, at the California Olive Oil Council, headquartered in Berkeley. The judging panel will be comprised of six olive oil sensory experts provided by the California Olive Oil Council. Winners will be announced on May 29, 2015.

    Each submission must include an entry form, at least two 250 ml bottles of the olive oil with retail labels attached and a $60 non-refundable fee per entry. Entries can be dropped off at The Big Fresno Fair Administration Office or can be shipped to SJVOOC – The Big Fresno Fair, 1121 S. Chance Ave. Fresno, CA 93702 no later than 5 p.m. on May 8, 2015. Any entry delivered by mail, freight or express must be prepaid. The Administration Office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for drop offs.

    For more information about the new San Joaquin Valley Olive Oil Competition including downloadable entry forms and deadlines, please visit www.fresnofair.com/sjv-olive-oil-competition, email questions to srianda@fresnofair.com or call The Big Fresno Fair office at (559) 650-FAIR.

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    The Big Fresno Fair is launching its inaugural San Joaquin Valley Olive Oil Competition. The competition, in partnership with the California Olive Oil Council, is open to all olive oil producers in the State of California with olive oil made from the most recent olive harvest.... 
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  • EU fixing monthly quantitative limits for Tunisian olive oil imports

    The Official Journal of the European Union published the Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2015/189 of 6 February 2015 fixing the allocation coefficient to be applied to applications for import licences for olive oil lodged from 2 to 3 February 2015 under the Tunisian tariff quota and suspending the issue of import licences for the month of February 2015.

    The Commission Regulation (EC) No 1918/2006 of 20 December 2006 opening and providing for the administration of tariff quota for olive oil originating in Tunisia lays down monthly quantitative limits for the issue of import licences.

    The reason of limit fixed last saturday is import licence applications have been submitted to the competent authorities in respect of a total quantity exceeding the limit laid down for the month of March in Article 2 of that Regulation.

    In these circumstances, the Commission must set an allocation coefficient allowing import licences to be issued in proportion to the quantity available. Since the limit for the month of March has been reached, the quantities for which import licence applications were lodged for 2 and 3 March 2015 shall be multiplied by an allocation coefficient of 5,45% and the issue of import licences in respect of amounts applied for as from 4 March 2015 shall be suspended for March 2015.

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    The Official Journal of the European Union published the Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) 2015/189 of 6 February 2015 fixing the allocation coefficient to be applied to applications for import licences for olive oil lodged from 2 to 3 February 2015 under the Tunisian tariff... 
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  • Vegetarian recipes with Extra Virgin Olive Oil - you won’t miss

    From feta with spinach and blood orange to baked dal and sweet potato – you won’t miss your meat with these inspired dishes.

    The oven has been busy this week – baking spiced aubergines, trays of roast vegetables with eggs and a layered dish of dal and sweet potatoes. There have been frying pans of peppers and wheat on the hob, and sesame-coated cheese for bright citrus salads. It was only as we ladled out the last of the layers of baked dal onto our plates that I realised the kitchen hasn’t seen a joint of meat all week.

    Feta with spinach and blood orange

    Serves 2

    INGREDIENTS
    sesame seeds 3 tbsp
    runny honey 2 tbsp
    feta 250g
    blood oranges 3
    extra virgin olive oil 30ml
    white wine vinegar 1 tbsp
    spinach leaves 100g

    DIRECTIONS
    Toast the sesame seeds in a dry, shallow pan till golden then remove from the heat. Brush the honey on the surface of the feta then place the cheese flat side down in the sesame seeds and press gently. Turn the cheese over, brush the surface generously with honey then turn and pat down gently to cover with seeds.

    Place the sesame-covered cheese on a piece of tin foil then place in a baking dish. Bake for 10 minutes until the cheese has started to soften.

    While the cheese bakes, remove the peel from two of the oranges with a very sharp knife, then cut them into thickish slices, about six per fruit. Squeeze the remaining orange into a bowl, and add the olive oil, vinegar, a little salt and some black pepper, coarsely ground, and then the sliced oranges.

    Wash the spinach and dry in a salad spinner, then toss with the orange slices and their dressing. Divide the spinach and orange slices between two plates, then spoon over some of the orange and olive oil dressing. Cut the warm feta in half, and place one piece on each plate.

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    From feta with spinach and blood orange to baked dal and sweet potato – you won’t miss your meat with these inspired dishes. The oven has been busy this week – baking spiced aubergines, trays of roast vegetables with eggs and a layered dish of dal and sweet potatoes. There... 
    Read More →
  • Greek Recipe: OLIVE BREAD

    Time of cooking 1.5 hour

    Ingredients
    1kg of baking flour
    1tbsp of yeast
    1tsp of sugar
    1.5 tsp of salt
    1 tbsp of balsamic vinegar
    4 tbsp of Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    400ml of warm water
    150g of black olives

    Directions
    Mix all the ingredients except olives.

    Knead the mixture very well and leave the dough to rise in the oven or warm place (30ºC) until it doubles its size.

    Then re-knead and add olives with a bit of olive oil.

    Put the dough on a baking tray and for the decoration cut the top with a knife and add some olives.

    Place the tray in the oven (100ºC) for 15min and then raise the temperature to 200ºC for about an hour.

    Recipe source

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    Time of cooking 1.5 hour Ingredients 1kg of baking flour 1tbsp of yeast 1tsp of sugar 1.5 tsp of salt 1 tbsp of balsamic vinegar 4 tbsp of Extra Virgin Olive Oil 400ml of warm water 150g of black olives Directions Mix all the ingredients except olives. Knead the mixture very... 
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  • Get Olive Oil from Your Private Olive Tree in Italy with GPS coordinates

    Imagine telling your family that you have just adopted an olive tree in Tuscany…

    If you love our beautiful region rich in history, culture, art and gorgeous landscapes, adopting a tree from Italian Azienda Agricola Merlini groves would give a real contribution to the preservation of its landscape.

    Act now, adopt an olive tree!

    Adopt now one of Azienda Agricola Merlini olive trees and give a concrete contribution to the preservation of Tuscan landscape, forged through the centuries by man’s work!

    With your help small companies like Azienda Agricola Merlini will be able to survive and continue their essential work handed down since centuries in order to preserve our precious heritage: a natural jewel, a treasure of knowledge that belongs to us all!!

    Would you like to make a truly original gift and offer it to someone special?

    Adopting a tree is a fun and easy way to help the environment. It also makes a unique, affordable and (if you wish) long-lasting gift or memorial. It is a special surprise for those who love Tuscany, its nature, culture and flavors: give someone you love a enjoyable piece of the Tuscan heritage, and the opportunity to take care of one of its olive trees!

    How much does it cost?

    Just € 100.00 per year **

    ADOPT AN OLIVE TREE AND:

    1. You will receive the Olive Oil from your tree: 1.00 liter of extra virgin olive oil produced by Farm, Azienda Agricola Merlini, shipped directly to your home, or the person you chose**. The olives of your plant will be pressed together with the ones of the neighboring trees (it is indeed a family affair!)

    2. You will receive the Adoption Certificate. The tree will be tagged with the name of your choice for the adoption year/s, and the name will be stated on the Adoption Certificate together with its GPS coordinates.

    3. You will be able to come and see your olive tree when you want and also to participate to the harvest. (We just have one request. Please, let us know in advance – 30 days – that you are coming, so we can organize your visit.)

    4. We will email you (or the recipient) pictures and information regarding your olive tree. You will be constantly informed from “bloom to fruits” either by mail or social network.

    Read HOW TO ADOPT AN OLIVE TREE

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    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +3 (from 17 votes)
    Imagine telling your family that you have just adopted an olive tree in Tuscany… If you love our beautiful region rich in history, culture, art and gorgeous landscapes, adopting a tree from Italian Azienda Agricola Merlini groves would give a real contribution to the preservation... 
    Read More →
  • Hispack & Bta. is back in 2015 with its 3rd edition together

    Hispack and BTA. together constitute one of the largest commercial platforms in the European Union for the food and beverage industry, the main consumer of machinery and packaging material.

    This double event at Fira de Barcelona will feature the various stages of the food product, from ingredients to equipment and technology for the manufacturing process to packaging and arrival at the point of purchase.

    Altogether, more than 1,200 firms and 35,000 trade professionals are expected to attend.
    2015-03-13_1512
    Hispack brings together materials, technology, logistics and solutions for the manufacturing of all types of packages and packaging, along with items for point of purchase advertising. BTA., meanwhile, features machinery and equipment for food manufacturing and sales, the meat and related industries, and ingredients and intermediate food products.

    Hispack will be in Halls 1, 2 and 3 of the Gran Via exhibition centre and BTA. will be in Halls 4 and 5.

    Why visit?

    1.A comprehensive cross-cutting offer
    Over 1,200 exhibiting companies from 36 countries that meet all food industry needs, from ingredients to packaging, to food processing and intra logistics.

    2. A place for innovation
    Discover the latest trends and solutions in packaging and food technology in innovation areas such as the Trendpack Area, the Innovation Meeting Point and IRTA and AINIA technology centers.

    3. Activities and networking opportunities
    Take part in a wide range of activities focused on technology, innovation and business. Make contact with the best companies and professionals in the sector in our networking areas.

    hispack.visitantes@firabarcelona.com
    902 233 200
    hispack.com

    visitbta@alimentaria.com
    902 233 200
    bta-bcn.com

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    Rating: +1 (from 13 votes)
    Hispack and BTA. together constitute one of the largest commercial platforms in the European Union for the food and beverage industry, the main consumer of machinery and packaging material. This double event at Fira de Barcelona will feature the various stages of the food product,... 
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  • "Use caution when storing olive oil" - DR. BLONZ advices

    Question: A local natural foods store recently held a seminar on cooking oils. The talk favored olive oil over alternatives, but it said that when you open any bottle of cooking oil, such as corn, safflower, canola or peanut, the oxygen in the air immediately begins spoiling the oil. They said this was a “hidden cause of disease.” They advised refrigerating all cooking oils after opening. However, product labels make no mention of any need to refrigerate. What do you recommend?

    DR. BLONZ: It is true that air gets in when you open the bottle, and the oxygen in the air participates in the oxidation reactions associated with spoilage. However, it’s a slow process under normal conditions, and there is no evidence to fear that your oil, or your body, is at risk.

    You can keep oils at room temperature, but you should follow some simple guidelines: Keep oils out of the sunlight and away from heat. And always keep the container sealed when not in use. Avoid buying amounts in sizes greater than you typically use in three to four months.

    There’s no problem with storing oil in the refrigerator, but if you decide to go that route, be sure to have a tight seal on the container to keep the oil from picking up any undesirable refrigerator odors. Some oils may become cloudy when refrigerated, but this disappears when they return to room temperature.

    Oils can go rancid if they are mistreated or stored in the wrong way. Rancidity does occur when an oil reacts with oxygen, and aside from giving foods an “off” taste, the consumption of oxidized oil does represent a health risk. The greater the degree of unsaturation (double bonds), the greater the tendency to oxidize. Omega-3 oils, such as flax or fish oil, have more double bonds than other oils, so they are very susceptible to spoilage. This helps explain the nasty aroma of fish left at room temperature for an extended period of time.

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    Question: A local natural foods store recently held a seminar on cooking oils. The talk favored olive oil over alternatives, but it said that when you open any bottle of cooking oil, such as corn, safflower, canola or peanut, the oxygen in the air immediately begins spoiling... 
    Read More →
  • Study: Novel emulsifiers from olive processing solid waste

    The study, published in Food Hydrocolloids, investigated the composition of extracts obtained from solid olive processing waste and tested their potential as high added-value food emulsifiers – finding that the processing waste yields efficient emulsifiers that have potential for use in food and beverage applications.

    “Olive waste, a major pollutant in the Mediterranean and in other areas, could be used as to reclaim high added value food hydrocolloids,” wrote the study authors, led by Andreas Filotheou from ATEI of Thessaloniki, Greece.

    According to the team, the material obtained using direct extractions from the waste products provided emulsifiers comprising of macromolecular aggregates and smaller molecules.

    Tests suggested significant differences in the dynamics of adsorption of different extracts and in their equilibrium interfacial tension are related to their emulsifying capacity and emulsion stability.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.4/10 (53 votes cast)
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    Rating: +6 (from 16 votes)
    The study, published in Food Hydrocolloids, investigated the composition of extracts obtained from solid olive processing waste and tested their potential as high added-value food emulsifiers – finding that the processing waste yields efficient emulsifiers that have potential... 
    Read More →
  • BeoGourmet - Welcome to Belgrade gourmet gathering!

    Would you like to extend your activity in Serbia and in the Balkan region? There is an unique opportunity and solution to take part in the most complete oenological and gastronomical gathering in the Balkans BeoGourmet.

    BeoGourmet Belgrade Wine and Food weekend to be held on 25th and 26th April in the hotel Crowne Plaza in Belgrade with a very significant participation by professional operators and gastronomic fans from Serbia and from the countries in the region.

    Main target of this event is gastronomical meeting between the eastern and the western part of Europe.

    The objective of this meeting is to get to know the achievements and the traditions in gastronomy and enology.

    Event organizers offering the best and promotional conditions for you.

    Participation fee is 400€ which includes transport and importation of the samples from Ljubljana (Slovenia) to Belgrade.

    Event organizers propose for your stay Crowne Plaza hotel with the best price.

    For any further information and application please contact by telephone +381 11 7113938,
    cell + 381 63 238322, website www.beogourmet.com.

    See you in Belgrade!

    Kralja Milutina 51, Beograd, Srbija
    tel + 381 11 711 39 38
    mob + 381 63 23 83 22
    mail info@beogourmet.com
    web site www.beogourmet.com

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    Would you like to extend your activity in Serbia and in the Balkan region? There is an unique opportunity and solution to take part in the most complete oenological and gastronomical gathering in the Balkans BeoGourmet. BeoGourmet Belgrade Wine and Food weekend to be held on... 
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