Daily Archives: March 13, 2015

  • Hispack & Bta. is back in 2015 with its 3rd edition together

    Hispack and BTA. together constitute one of the largest commercial platforms in the European Union for the food and beverage industry, the main consumer of machinery and packaging material.

    This double event at Fira de Barcelona will feature the various stages of the food product, from ingredients to equipment and technology for the manufacturing process to packaging and arrival at the point of purchase.

    Altogether, more than 1,200 firms and 35,000 trade professionals are expected to attend.
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    Hispack brings together materials, technology, logistics and solutions for the manufacturing of all types of packages and packaging, along with items for point of purchase advertising. BTA., meanwhile, features machinery and equipment for food manufacturing and sales, the meat and related industries, and ingredients and intermediate food products.

    Hispack will be in Halls 1, 2 and 3 of the Gran Via exhibition centre and BTA. will be in Halls 4 and 5.

    Why visit?

    1.A comprehensive cross-cutting offer
    Over 1,200 exhibiting companies from 36 countries that meet all food industry needs, from ingredients to packaging, to food processing and intra logistics.

    2. A place for innovation
    Discover the latest trends and solutions in packaging and food technology in innovation areas such as the Trendpack Area, the Innovation Meeting Point and IRTA and AINIA technology centers.

    3. Activities and networking opportunities
    Take part in a wide range of activities focused on technology, innovation and business. Make contact with the best companies and professionals in the sector in our networking areas.

    hispack.visitantes@firabarcelona.com
    902 233 200
    hispack.com

    visitbta@alimentaria.com
    902 233 200
    bta-bcn.com

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    Hispack and BTA. together constitute one of the largest commercial platforms in the European Union for the food and beverage industry, the main consumer of machinery and packaging material. This double event at Fira de Barcelona will feature the various stages of the food product,... 
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  • "Use caution when storing olive oil" - DR. BLONZ advices

    Question: A local natural foods store recently held a seminar on cooking oils. The talk favored olive oil over alternatives, but it said that when you open any bottle of cooking oil, such as corn, safflower, canola or peanut, the oxygen in the air immediately begins spoiling the oil. They said this was a “hidden cause of disease.” They advised refrigerating all cooking oils after opening. However, product labels make no mention of any need to refrigerate. What do you recommend?

    DR. BLONZ: It is true that air gets in when you open the bottle, and the oxygen in the air participates in the oxidation reactions associated with spoilage. However, it’s a slow process under normal conditions, and there is no evidence to fear that your oil, or your body, is at risk.

    You can keep oils at room temperature, but you should follow some simple guidelines: Keep oils out of the sunlight and away from heat. And always keep the container sealed when not in use. Avoid buying amounts in sizes greater than you typically use in three to four months.

    There’s no problem with storing oil in the refrigerator, but if you decide to go that route, be sure to have a tight seal on the container to keep the oil from picking up any undesirable refrigerator odors. Some oils may become cloudy when refrigerated, but this disappears when they return to room temperature.

    Oils can go rancid if they are mistreated or stored in the wrong way. Rancidity does occur when an oil reacts with oxygen, and aside from giving foods an “off” taste, the consumption of oxidized oil does represent a health risk. The greater the degree of unsaturation (double bonds), the greater the tendency to oxidize. Omega-3 oils, such as flax or fish oil, have more double bonds than other oils, so they are very susceptible to spoilage. This helps explain the nasty aroma of fish left at room temperature for an extended period of time.

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    Question: A local natural foods store recently held a seminar on cooking oils. The talk favored olive oil over alternatives, but it said that when you open any bottle of cooking oil, such as corn, safflower, canola or peanut, the oxygen in the air immediately begins spoiling... 
    Read More →
  • Study: Novel emulsifiers from olive processing solid waste

    The study, published in Food Hydrocolloids, investigated the composition of extracts obtained from solid olive processing waste and tested their potential as high added-value food emulsifiers – finding that the processing waste yields efficient emulsifiers that have potential for use in food and beverage applications.

    “Olive waste, a major pollutant in the Mediterranean and in other areas, could be used as to reclaim high added value food hydrocolloids,” wrote the study authors, led by Andreas Filotheou from ATEI of Thessaloniki, Greece.

    According to the team, the material obtained using direct extractions from the waste products provided emulsifiers comprising of macromolecular aggregates and smaller molecules.

    Tests suggested significant differences in the dynamics of adsorption of different extracts and in their equilibrium interfacial tension are related to their emulsifying capacity and emulsion stability.

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    Rating: 4.4/10 (53 votes cast)
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    Rating: +6 (from 16 votes)
    The study, published in Food Hydrocolloids, investigated the composition of extracts obtained from solid olive processing waste and tested their potential as high added-value food emulsifiers – finding that the processing waste yields efficient emulsifiers that have potential... 
    Read More →