Daily Archives: March 1, 2015

  • Enjoy gluten-free recipe: Fried Egg and Smashed Avocado with Olive Oil

    Ingredients

    1 cup garbanzo bean flour (aka chickpea flour)
    1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
    1 tablespoon plain yogurt, whey (the liquid that separates from yogurt), or water
    Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    4 eggs
    1 avocado

    Directions

    In a medium mixing bowl, stir together the flour and salt. In a small bowl, whisk together the yogurt and 3⁄4 cup lukewarm water, then whisk the liquid into the flour in four additions, until the batter is smooth.

    Heat an 8-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Spray with cooking spray or brush with a thin film of oil. Pour 1⁄4 cup of batter into the skillet and immediately tilt it to make the batter evenly cover the bottom of the skillet. Cook until bubbles appear in the center of the crepe, about 2 minutes; flip with a spatula, and cook briefly on the other side, about 30 seconds. Flip the crepe onto a plate and cover it with a clean cloth to keep it warm, and repeat with the rest of the crepe batter.

    To cook the eggs:

    Carefully crack 2 eggs into the pan, without touching, and fry to desired doneness. Repeat with 2 more teaspoons olive oil and 2 more eggs. Place 4 crepes on individual plates, top each with 1⁄2 an avocado mashed with a fork and 1 olive oil–fried egg.
    Squeeze 1 lemon wedge over the crepe, sprinkle with salt and Aleppo pepper, and serve.

    4 servings

    Notes

    This batter can be made and kept in the fridge for up to three days, though you may need to whisk in a tablespoonful or two of water if it becomes too thick. Once cooked, the crepes can be stacked between wax paper or nonstick parchment paper, wrapped airtight, and refrigerated for one day or frozen for up to a month. To serve frozen crepes, defrost them in the refrigerator, then reheat them briefly in a hot skillet.

    Recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.7/10 (292 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -5 (from 107 votes)
    Ingredients 1 cup garbanzo bean flour (aka chickpea flour) 1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon plain yogurt, whey (the liquid that separates from yogurt), or water Extra Virgin Olive Oil 4 eggs 1 avocado Directions In a medium mixing bowl, stir together the flour and salt.... 
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  • Oleocanthal in extra virgin olive oil rapidly and selectively induces cancer cell death

    The researchers, nutritional scientist Paul Breslin (Rutgers University), biologist David Foster (Hunter College) and chemist Onica LeGendre (Hunter College) investigated the effect of oleocanthal (OC) on human cancer cell lines in culture.

    Oleocanthal, a phenolic compound in extra virgin olive oil, has been implicated in the health benefits associated with diets rich in olive oil.

    Amazingly, oleocanthal induced cell death in all cancer cells examined – as rapidly as 30 minutes after treatment in the absence of serum.

    OC treatment of non-transformed cells suppressed proliferation, but did not cause cell death.

    Oleocanthal induced both primary necrotic and apoptotic cell death via induction of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP).

    Researchers provide evidence that oleocanthal promotes LMP by inhibiting acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activity, which destabilizes the interaction between proteins necessary for lysosomal membrane stability.

    The data presented here indicates that cancer cells having fragile lysosomal membranes – as compared to non-cancerous cells – are susceptible to lysosomotropic agent-induced cell death. Therefore, targeting lysosomal membrane stabiltiy represents a novel approach to induce cancer-specific cell death.

    Source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.2/10 (204 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +1 (from 59 votes)
    The researchers, nutritional scientist Paul Breslin (Rutgers University), biologist David Foster (Hunter College) and chemist Onica LeGendre (Hunter College) investigated the effect of oleocanthal (OC) on human cancer cell lines in culture. Oleocanthal, a phenolic compound in... 
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  • What is happening to the battleship Spanish olive oil?

    Spanish olive oil system was to dominate the world but increasingly difficult, with signals that are alarmed by all operators.

    After the protest of olive growers in Andalusia against Carrefour and GDO Iberian, guilty of promoting sales below cost of olive oil, now also the futures market and the Spanish giant Deoleo, difficulties, for several reasons.

    The board of MFAO (futures market of olive oil) is experiencing one of the most difficult moments of the past decade, due to its necessary transformation, from Resale evolved, to the financial instrument in effect, according to the dictates of European regulation on the Multilateral Trading System.

    The new European regulation puts MFAO like financial markets secondary type derivatives, requiring organizational and capital requirements that are ill-adapted au futures market of agricultural commodities. A situation that has blocked MFAO since last November and, presumably, until next May. The board of the futures market has thus had to launch an austerity plan with extraordinary reduction of all costs by 55%.

    While also Deoleo had to announce the end of the year at a loss of 74 million euro, compared to 20 million profit in 2013. The loss was largely due to the costs of entry of the new shareholder, CVC Partners, valued at 81 million euro. A worry more investors, however, especially the decline in sales of Deoleo, fell below the 800 million euro, 773 million, a decrease of 4.9% compared to 2013.

    According Deoleo the last quarter of 2014 would have aggravated the situation , with the increase in wholesale prices and the simultaneous demand volumes for sales below cost by the large retailers. According Deoleo the problem is in the attitude and policies of retail that “harms the margins along the entire value chain, compromising the future of the industry.”

    The original sin of Spain olive oil, having transformed the olive oil in a commodity, is now revealing its worst effects, revealing the shortcomings of the strategic plan of the Spanish domination of the industry.

    Now Italy take the cultural and political leadership, to redirect the fund along other tracks. It will be capable of and he is alive?

    Source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.9/10 (170 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +6 (from 44 votes)
    Spanish olive oil system was to dominate the world but increasingly difficult, with signals that are alarmed by all operators. After the protest of olive growers in Andalusia against Carrefour and GDO Iberian, guilty of promoting sales below cost of olive oil, now also the futures... 
    Read More →
  • Recipe: Crab Taquitos with Salsa and Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Makes 18 taquitos; serves 6

    The salsa and aioli can be made ahead. Buy the freshest corn tortillas you can find.

    INGREDIENTS

    The salsa
    1½ cups tomatillos (about ½ pound)
    1 large avocado
    1 clove garlic
    ¼ bunch fresh cilantro, stemmed
    Kosher salt, to taste

    The aioli
    1 large egg yolk
    1 cup mild extra virgin olive oil
    1 clove garlic, minced
    1 small jalapeño or serrano chile, minced (about 3 teaspoons)
    Kosher salt, to taste
    Lemon juice, to taste

    The taquitos
    2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter
    2 small carrots, finely diced
    1 rib celery, finely diced
    2 large shallots, minced
    Grated zest of 2 limes
    1 pound cooked Dungeness crab meat
    18 (5-inch) fresh corn tortillas
    Vegetable oil, for softening tortillas and frying taquitos

    DIRECTIONS

    1. Make the salsa.

    Put the whole tomatillos in a bowl of cold water (this makes them easier to peel), then peel off the sticky outer husk. Transfer the tomatillos to a food processor and add the avocado, garlic and cilantro. Process until smooth, thinning with water as necessary to make a sauce with a pourable consistency. Season to taste with salt, then transfer to a bowl and set aside.

    2. Make the aioli.

    Put the egg yolk in a medium bowl set on top of a kitchen towel (this will help stabilize the bowl as you whisk). Pour the oil into a measuring cup with a pouring spout.

    Begin whisking the egg yolk with your dominant hand, holding the measuring cup of oil in your other hand. Pour the oil into the yolk, drop by drop at first, whisking continuously, until the mixture begins to visibly thicken and emulsify; if you add the oil too quickly at the beginning, the emulsion will break and the aioli will not thicken properly. Once you’ve established the emulsion, continue to add the oil in a steady stream, whisking constantly, until all of the oil has been incorporated.

    “If at any point the aioli starts to look ropy or has visible whisk lines, whisk in a few teaspoons of warm water, which will help smooth it out,” Savitsky says.

    When all of the oil has been incorporated, stir in the minced garlic and chile, and season to taste with salt and lemon juice. This recipe will make more aioli than you need for the taquitos. The remainder can be stored in the refrigerator up to a week.

    3. Make the taquito filling.

    In a medium frying pan over medium heat, heat the olive oil and butter. When the butter has melted, add the carrots, celery and shallots, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring, until the vegetables are soft but not browned, about 10 minutes.

    Transfer to a bowl and add the lime zest and crab meat, breaking up any large chunks of crab and making sure to discard any cartilage or shell. Add 3 tablespoons of the prepared aioli and stir to combine. The mixture should be moist but not overdressed; add additional aioli if necessary.

    4. Stuff and roll the taquitos.

    Pour a small film of vegetable oil into a small frying pan; When the oil is hot, fry the tortillas one at a time just until pliable, flipping once, about 30 seconds total. Repeat with remaining tortillas.

    If you don’t want to fry the tortillas, you can wrap them in a clean kitchen towel and microwave them until pliable, 30 seconds to 1 minute, then fill and fry as described in Step 5.

    Place about 3 tablespoons of the crab mixture in a line about one-third of the way from the bottom edge of each tortilla. Gently fold the bottom of the tortilla over the filling and roll up like a cigar. The cylinders should be about 1-inch in diameter. To keep the tortillas rolled up, place 3 of the rolls side by side and pierce through all of them with two evenly spaced wooden skewers.

    5. Fry and serve.

    In a heavy-bottom pot suitable for deep frying, pour canola oil to a depth of 1½ inches and turn the burner to medium-high. Heat the oil until it starts to ripple; test the temperature by gently submerging a set of skewered taquitos — the oil should start quickly bubbling on contact. If it does not, the oil is too cool. If it bubbles furiously, the oil is too hot.

    Working in batches, fry the taquitos for 2 to 3 minutes, until lightly browned. The ends should be crisp but the middles should remain slightly soft. Transfer to paper towels to drain and sprinkle with salt. Repeat with remaining taquitos.

    Serve hot, accompanied by the Tomatillo-Avocado Salsa.

    Per serving: 466 calories, 23 g protein, 44 g carbohydrates, 23 g fat (5 g saturated), 68 mg cholesterol, 312 mg sodium, 7 g fiber.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.7/10 (99 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +11 (from 27 votes)
    Makes 18 taquitos; serves 6 The salsa and aioli can be made ahead. Buy the freshest corn tortillas you can find. INGREDIENTS The salsa 1½ cups tomatillos (about ½ pound) 1 large avocado 1 clove garlic ¼ bunch fresh cilantro, stemmed Kosher salt, to taste The aioli 1 large... 
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