Daily Archives: February 12, 2015

  • Ingredient in Olive Oil Looks Promising in the Fight Against Cancer

    Extra-virgin olive oil contains an ingredient, oleocanthal, that kills cancer cells without harming healthy cells, researchers have found.

    A Rutgers nutritional scientist and two cancer biologists at New York City’s Hunter College have found that an ingredient in extra-virgin olive oil kills a variety of human cancer cells without harming healthy cells.

    The ingredient is oleocanthal, a compound that ruptures a part of the cancerous cell, releasing enzymes that cause cell death.

    Paul Breslin, professor of nutritional sciences in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, and David Foster and Onica LeGendre of Hunter College, report that oleocanthal kills cancerous cells in the laboratory by rupturing vesicles that store the cell’s waste. LeGendre, the first author, Foster, the senior author, and Breslin have published their findings in Molecular and Cellular Oncology.

    According to the World Health Organization’s World Cancer Report 2014, there were more than 14 million new cases of cancer in 2012 and more than 8 million deaths.

    Scientists knew that oleocanthal killed some cancer cells, but no one really understood how this occurred. Breslin believed that oleocanthal might be targeting a key protein in cancer cells that triggers a programmed cell death, known as apoptosis, and worked with Foster and Legendre to test his hypothesis after meeting David Foster at a seminar he gave at Rutgers.

    “We needed to determine if oleocanthal was targeting that protein and causing the cells to die,” Breslin said.

    After applying oleocanthal to the cancer cells, Foster and LeGendre discovered that the cancer cells were dying very quickly – within 30 minutes to an hour. Since programmed cell death takes between 16 and 24 hours, the scientists realized that something else had to be causing the cancer cells to break down and die.

    LeGendre, a chemist, provided the answer: The cancer cells were being killed by their own enzymes. The oleocanthal was puncturing the vesicles inside the cancer cells that store the cell’s waste – the cell’s “dumpster,” as Breslin called it, or “recycling center,” as Foster refers to it. These vesicles, known as lysosomes are larger in cancer cells than in healthy cells, and they contain a lot of waste. “Once you open one of those things, all hell breaks loose,” Breslin said.

    But oleocanthal didn’t harm healthy cells, the researchers found. It merely stopped their life cycles temporarily – “put them to sleep,” Breslin said. After a day, the healthy cells resumed their cycles.

    The researchers say the logical next step is to go beyond laboratory conditions and show that oleocanthal can kill cancer cells and shrink tumors in living animals. “We also need to understand why it is that cancerous cells are more sensitive to oleocanthal than non-cancerous cells,” Foster said.

    Article source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.9/10 (98 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +5 (from 29 votes)
    Extra-virgin olive oil contains an ingredient, oleocanthal, that kills cancer cells without harming healthy cells, researchers have found. A Rutgers nutritional scientist and two cancer biologists at New York City’s Hunter College have found that an ingredient in extra-virgin... 
    Read More →
  • Napa Valley olive oil competition coming soon

    The fifth annual Napa Valley Olive Oil Competition, open to all California olive oil producers, is Friday, April 3, organizers announced.

    Divisions include categories for Extra Virgin, Organic, and Micro Producers as well as for flavored varieties that are co-milled or infused, they said.

    “We are committed not only to the future success of the Napa Valley Olive Oil Competition, but also to increasing public awareness and knowledge of extra virgin olive oil,” organizers said in the announcement. “In pursuit of our dedication to increase public awareness, we offer two opportunities for direct-to-consumer showcasing of the 2015 award-winning olive oils at our coming events.”

    One of these is an invitation to award-winning producers to sell and sample their oils to patrons of the Engage Art Festival, April 25-26 and at the Napa County Fair & Fireworks on July 4. The other is that award-winning chefs are provided the winning oils to use in their recipes at Engage Art Festival and the Napa County Fair & Fireworks, they said.

    Entry forms and details are available at www.celebratenapavalley.org/events/2015/napa-valley-olive-oil-competition. All submissions must be received by March 27. The competition is chaired, and will be judged by, trained olive oil taste panel members using a 100 point system adapted from the International Olive Oil Council. Judges will award Gold, Silver and Bronze placings as well as Best of Class and Best of Show.

    The complete list of award winners will be available online at www.CelebrateNapaValley.org. at the conclusion of the judging.

    For more information or to submit entries visit www.celebratenapavalley.org/events/2015/napa-valley-olive-oil-competition, Or call the Fair office at (707) 942-5111.

    Source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.5/10 (102 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -3 (from 17 votes)
    The fifth annual Napa Valley Olive Oil Competition, open to all California olive oil producers, is Friday, April 3, organizers announced. Divisions include categories for Extra Virgin, Organic, and Micro Producers as well as for flavored varieties that are co-milled or infused,... 
    Read More →
  • Recipe: Filet of Sole and Shrimp Francese with Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Serves 4

    INGREDIENTS

    6 tbsp. We Olive Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    6 tbsp. butter
    6 pieces of sole
    1 pound of shrimp, cleaned, de-veined and butterflied
    1 cup of flour
    2 eggs
    4 cloves of garlic
    2 lemons, sliced
    1/4 fresh lemon juice
    1/4 cup white wine
    1/2 vegetable stock
    3 tbsp. fresh chopped parsley
    1 tsp. salt
    1 tsp. pepper

    PREPERATION
    1. Start by preheating your oven to 300 degrees. Prepare a large skillet over medium heat, add 3 tbsp. of the oil and 3 tbsp. of the butter. Heat until foaming.

    2. Pour your flour in a shallow dish or deep enough bowl. Whisk two eggs in a medium size bowl. Dredge the fillets in the flour, make sure you coat both sides and then dip the fish in the eggs, and make sure it’s evenly covered. Repeat with all of the fillets and add to your skillet. Cook each side for 4-8 minutes; you want the bottom of the filet to get lightly browned before you flip them. Transfer the fillets to a baking sheet and place them in the oven to stay warm.

    3. Repeat the same exact process with the shrimp. The shrimp however will cook very quickly, around 1-3 minutes each side. Transfer to the same baking sheet with the fish. Once you are done with all of the fish, add the remaining oil and butter and garlic to the skillet. Wait for the butter to foam and add the sliced lemons. Cook for 2 minutes. Add the lemon juice, wine and bring to a boil, cook until somewhat reduced. Add the vegetable stock; bring to a boil until the sauce is lightly thickened. Sprinkle in the parsley, salt and pepper. Reduce the heat to low and add the fish and shrimp to the skillet. Serve immediately. Buon Appetito!!

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.5/10 (90 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +4 (from 30 votes)
    Serves 4 INGREDIENTS 6 tbsp. We Olive Extra Virgin Olive Oil 6 tbsp. butter 6 pieces of sole 1 pound of shrimp, cleaned, de-veined and butterflied 1 cup of flour 2 eggs 4 cloves of garlic 2 lemons, sliced 1/4 fresh lemon juice 1/4 cup white wine 1/2 vegetable stock 3 tbsp. fresh... 
    Read More →
  • Olive Oil producers Prices in EU countries plus Tunisia

    It is not for the IOC to judge whether these price levels reflect an adequate balance between production costs along the supply chain and the prices that consumers are prepared to pay to continue consuming olive oil but they are a concern that all the players will no doubt take into account for the long-term sustainable equilibrium and development of the sector.

    Extra virgin olive oil:
    Producer prices in Spain started to rise constantly in the second half of 2014. After breaking the three-euro barrier in the second week of December 2014, they continued upwards to reach €3.28/kg by the end of January 2015. This is the highest level yet in the period under review and is 60 pc higher than a year earlier and 67 pc above the low recorded in May 2014 (€1.96/kg) (Graph 1).

    Italy: In recent months, producer prices in Italy have been on a very clear upward trend. In the week from 10 to 16 November 2014, they hit the highest level of both the period under review and the last decade, reaching €6.79/kg. After a small dip in the second last week of December 2014, prices switched back upwards to reach €6.03/kg at the end of January 2015, equating with an increase of 103 pc on a year earlier and 128 pc compared with the low recorded in the second week of December 2013 (€2.64/kg). Graph 2 shows how the monthly prices of extra virgin olive oil have changed in recent crop years.

    Greece: After holding steady at €2.51/kg through July and August 2014, producer prices in Greece climbed for several weeks. After declining at the beginning of October they rose to high levels in the next three months, then breaking the three-euro/kg barrier in the third week of January 2015. By the end of the month, they stood at €3.01/kg, showing 21 pc growth on the same period a season earlier.

    Tunisia: Towards the end of December 2014, producers were paid €2.73/kg for their extra virgin olive oil. Prices held steady for a few weeks but then started to move upwards to €2.93/kg by the end of January 2015 (+16 pc compared with a year earlier). In the coming months it will be interesting to see how and if prices are affected by the flexibility offered by the EU in the monthly quotas fixed for February and March for Tunisian

    Refined olive oil: Producer prices for refined olive oil moved in a similar upward direction in Spain and Italy from June 2014. In Spain they dipped slightly in the last two weeks of September 2014, then rallying to €2.82/kg by the end of January 2015, up by 46 pc on the same period of the preceding crop year. While prices in Italy generally moved in parallel with those in Spain, they did record a peak in the third week of January 2014 (€2.83/kg).

    A year later, they were standing at €2.84/kg at the end of January 2015, translating into a period-on-period increase of 36 pc which restores Italian prices to their usual position above Spanish prices. No price data are available for this product category in Greece.

    At the end of January 2015, the price of refined olive oil and extra virgin olive oil in Spain differed by €0.46/kg, with €2.82/kg being paid for the first category and €3.28/kg for the second. In Italy, the difference in price between the two categories is considerably wider than in Spain (€3.19/kg – Graph 3).

    Graph 1 tracks the weekly movements in the prices paid to producers for extra virgin olive oil in the three top EU producing countries plus Tunisia while
    Graph 3 shows the weekly changes in the producer prices for refined olive oil in the three main EU producers.
    The monthly price movements for the same two grades of oil are given in Graphs 2 and 4.

    Graph_1

    graph_2

    graph_3

    graph_4

    Source: International Olive Council Newsletter N90 January 2015

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.2/10 (38 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 0 (from 12 votes)
    It is not for the IOC to judge whether these price levels reflect an adequate balance between production costs along the supply chain and the prices that consumers are prepared to pay to continue consuming olive oil but they are a concern that all the players will no doubt take... 
    Read More →
  • World picture for Olive Oil & Table Olives at the start

    Trade in olive oil and olive pomace oil got off to a good start in 2014/15 in the majority of the countries listed in the table below. In the first two months of the crop year (October and November 2014), imports were higher in Russia (+30 pc), Australia (+19 pc), Brazil (+10 pc), Japan (+8 pc), China (+7 pc), Canada (+6 pc) and the United States (+3 pc) compared with the same two-month period a year earlier.

    November 2014 data were not available for the EU at the time of publication but the October 2014 data show a 2 pc increase in intra-EU acquisitions and a decrease of 53 pc in extra-EU imports compared with October 2013.
    2015-02-12_olive_oil_imports

    WORLD PICTURE FOR TABLE OLIVES at the start of 2014/15

    In October and November 2014, the first two months of the 2014/15 crop year, table olive imports in the six countries listed in the table were higher in the cases of Russia (+10 pc) and Brazil (+1 pc) versus the same period a season earlier but lower in Australia (-12 pc), Canada (-10 pc) and the United States (-6 pc).

    At the time of publishing this newsletter, the November 2014 data were not available for the EU but in October 2014, the first month of the new crop year, intra-EU acquisitions were 1 pc lower than in October 13 whereas extra-EU imports were 34 pc higher.
    2015-02-12_1109

    Source: International Olive Council Newsletter N90 January 2015

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.9/10 (61 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +6 (from 22 votes)
    Trade in olive oil and olive pomace oil got off to a good start in 2014/15 in the majority of the countries listed in the table below. In the first two months of the crop year (October and November 2014), imports were higher in Russia (+30 pc), Australia (+19 pc), Brazil (+10... 
    Read More →