Monthly Archives: January 2015

  • SIMEI - 26th International Enological and Bottling Equipment Exhibition

     

     

    SIMEI logoSIMEI – International Enological and Bottling Equipment Exhibition – is the WORLD LEADER in wine technology and the only international biennial exhibition which presents at the same time machinery, equipment and products for production, bottling and packaging of all drinks.

    More than six billion hectoliter drinks of all sorts are drunk usually in the world and the consumption has a steady increase: this important sector needs always more technologically state-of-art machinery and equipment in order to improve the quality and to control the production costs.

    Simei meets all these requirements in a strictly specialized way. The displayed range actually includes small-, medium- and large-sized bottling line equipment, all kind of machinery for wine-making and the various wine treatments, materials and machines for the packaging cycle of bottled liquids, in-house equipment, containers in any shape or form, technological adjuvants and so on in the technically most modernized and economically most advantageous version.

    For more than 50 years SIMEI has been a protagonist among the international exhibitions: a must you can’t miss.

    New dates for the next SIMEI, bringing forward the event from 3rd to 6th November 2015 instead of from 17th to 20th.

    The change thus prevents the overlap with ITMA – the International Textile Machinery Exhibition – also due to take place at Fiera Milano Rho from 12th to 19th November – and therefore facilitates logistics for exhibitors and organizers and planning for visitors (accommodation, traffic, etc.)

    In addition, the opening on 3rd November is very close to the closing of Expo 2015 (31st October), creating an interesting opportunity for visitors, especially foreigners, to participate in two events of global significance.

    The organization of the 26th edition of SIMEI is in full swing and a large number of participations are coming in, confirming the high level of the event, a world leader in wine technology and important international showcase for the beverage sector. Organized by Unione Italiana Vini, the Exhibition brings together all the big players in the wine sector worldwide to present the best technologies and all that is new in production.

    The two international events are confirmed: the “Conference on Sustainability”, which continues the study work started already last year, and the first “International Conference on Sensory Analysis”, whose Steering Committee is chaired by Professor Anita Oberholster, Cooperative Extension Specialist in Enology at the Faculty of Viticulture and Enology, University of Davis, California.

     

    SIMEI – International Enological and Bottling Equipment Exhibition

    HALLS / 9-11-13-15 of Fiera Milano in Rho (MI)
    DATE/From Tuesday 3th to Friday 6th November 2015
    TIME / From 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
    RECEPTION/Admission is free and reserved to professional traders, upon filling in a form to get the entrance card.
    FIRST EDITION /1963
    FREQUENCY /Biennial
    EXHIBITOR PROFILE/Builders of machines, equipment, fittings and products for wine making and for the production, processing, bottling and packaging of drinks.
    VISITOR PROFILE/Producers, bottlers and distributors of any drink (wine, mineral water, beer, carbonated drinks, juices, brandies, spirits, vinegar, cooking oil, etc.)

    ORGANIZER
    Unione Italiana Vini soc. coop.
    Via San Vittore al Teatro 3, 20123 Milan (Italy)
    Tel. 0039 02 72222825/26/28 – Fax 0039 02 866575

     

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        SIMEI – International Enological and Bottling Equipment Exhibition – is the WORLD LEADER in wine technology and the only international biennial exhibition which presents at the same time machinery, equipment and products for production, bottling and... 
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  • Recipe of the Week: pork gnocchi marinated in EVOO

    Meet meat and potatoes in Italian style.

    The ancient potato dumpling recipe known as gnocchi serves as a pasta replacement. And it’s easy and inexpensive to make at home.

    This specific recipe calls for grilled pork marinated in garlic salt and extra virgin olive oil, and a tomato-based pasta sauce — often the way it is served in Italian restaurants — but it works well with other Italian ingredients and sauce of your choosing (a chicken Alfredo version is good).
    It is also used in soups.

    Picking the right potato is important as each variety cooks differently. Most online recipes recommend using russet potatoes, known for its high starch levels and easy mashing.

    grilled pork gnocchi

    Yield: 4 servings

    6 russet potatoes
    3 cups flour
    1 egg
    1 tablespoon salt
    1 jar of tomato-based pasta sauce
    1 grilled pork roast marinated in extra virgin olive oil and garlic, salt, Shredded Parmesan cheese.

    Cooked potatoes are strained before they are combined with other ingredients for gnocchi.

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    Source: Based on a DeLallo recipe.

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    Meet meat and potatoes in Italian style. The ancient potato dumpling recipe known as gnocchi serves as a pasta replacement. And it’s easy and inexpensive to make at home. This specific recipe calls for grilled pork marinated in garlic salt and extra virgin olive oil,... 
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  • New Year Resolutions

    There are some words and expressions which have become part of the olive industry vocabulary which we will try and replace in 2015:

    Educate consumers – used constantly by those promoting the use of extra virgin olive. The implication is that we have the knowledge and need to pass it on to the ‘uneducated’ consumer – in terms of vegetable oil usage anyway. Consumers are not uneducated and make their purchasing decisions for a range of good reasons – taste, health, price, tradition and availability. Perhaps we should communicate better with consumers – a two way process where we can understand their needs and offer our extra virgin olive oil or olive oil to meet them.

    Grassy or freshly cut grass – used to describe the aroma of fresh extra virgin olive oil. Humans don’t eat grass so why would we describe a food as grassy when there are many other fresh green herbs which can be used to describe the fresh herbal aroma. So let’s cut the ‘grassy’.

    Olive leaves – same as for ‘grassy’. We don’t eat olive leaves and they only smell when crushed in the olive oil mills – visited by very few consumers.

    Pungent – used to describe the flavour of robust or intense extra virgin olive oils, and toilet cleaners, industrial chemicals and other caustic products. Amongst its synonyms are stinking, odoriferous and sharp. Robust and intense are more descriptive with less ‘odorous’ implications – so let’s use them and throw out pungent.

    Our New Year Resolution is to communicate the flavour and other benefits of extra virgin olive oils using less patronising language and use descriptive terms that relate to the food with which the oil will be used.

    Source www.savantes.com

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    There are some words and expressions which have become part of the olive industry vocabulary which we will try and replace in 2015: Educate consumers – used constantly by those promoting the use of extra virgin olive. The implication is that we have the knowledge and need to... 
    Read More →
  • Champion Extra Virgin Olive Oil Taster Competition

    A competition to find the most accomplished taster of extra virgin olive oil will be staged in Chicago, USA on 26 August 2015.

    Organised by International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Savantes in association with the North American Olive Oil Association (NAOOA), the competition will be open to all those attending a major event in Chicago planned for August 25 and 26, 2015.

    Tasters will be invited to undertake a series of taste tests which will recognise their:

    ability to detect and describe defects in extra virgin olive oil,
    rank different intensities,
    discern between different aromas and tastes, and
    identify extra virgin olive oils from different varieties and regions worldwide.
    Those that take the tests will also have the option of being ranked on the International Register of Extra Virgin Olive Oil Savantes. A score of 60% will accord the status of Associate Savante and 80% the status of Savante. Currently there are nine Associate Savantes worldwide coming from Spain, Canada, New Zealand, USA and Jordan.

    The International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Savantes programme was founded in 2001 to provide professional development towards the expert understanding of the tastes and uses of extra virgin olive oil. Courses are run annually in various countries including Italy, USA, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and United Kingdom.

    Savantes is an independent enterprise which does not accept sponsorship or support from any organisation which would be seen to compromise the ability to present objectively the full range of styles of high quality extra virgin olive produced around the world. For the courses producers are invited to submit their oils for tasting with the invitations predicated on quality, awards and differentiation.

    Principal and organiser of Savantes, Simon Field said when announcing the plans for the competition ’ This will present a great opportunity for tasters from all parts of the global olive industry to assess their skills, not only in technical tasting but also in recognising varietals from other regions’.

    He continued, ‘There are many tasters at all levels of the industry who are self-trained or formally trained. Now is the time for them to have their skills recognised and publicised on an international register of tasters. We also hope it will encourage those who do not achieve the higher scores to engage in further training and experience to come back next year to gain higher recognition.’

    Further details of the competition and Chicago Conference will be available through a link to www.savantes.com by the end of January.

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    A competition to find the most accomplished taster of extra virgin olive oil will be staged in Chicago, USA on 26 August 2015. Organised by International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Savantes in association with the North American Olive Oil Association (NAOOA), the competition will... 
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  • "Totally Olive" shop in Las Vegas - taste before buying

    Totally Olive Shop carries a large variety of ultra-premium extra virgin olive oils, balsamic vinegars and specialty foods, giving customers the opportunity to taste products before making a purchase. Our staff can make recommendations for recipes and pairings to create unique flavors that enhance the dish being prepared.

    Who are your customers? Our customers are amateur home gourmet chefs looking to create new flavors and tastes, beyond the standard way of cooking traditional dishes. People who are health conscious and prefer cooking with a lower calorie and healthier choice such as extra virgin olive oil.

    What makes your business unique? People can come in and taste our products before buying.

    What is your business philosophy? Offer a high-quality product at a reasonable price with excellent, knowledgeable and friendly staff.

    What’s the most important part of your job? Ensuring that a high quality of customer service is maintained and constant training is taking place on the products we carry.

    What is the hardest part about doing business in Southern Nevada? With the amount of people now living in Southern Nevada, it’s hard to get your name out into the marketplace in a cost-efficient manner.

    What is the best part about doing business in Southern Nevada? The large population base and the diversity of the population.

    What obstacles has your business overcome? Getting our name into the marketplace and educating people on the health benefits of using extra virgin olive oil versus butter and other types and qualities of olive oil.

    How can Southern Nevada improve its business climate? Continue with its current direction. Las Vegas has a lot more to offer than just gambling.

    What have you learned from the recession? That you can still offer excellent customer service even though you have to better manage expenses. There are more cost-effective ways to operate than you previously knew.

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    Totally Olive Shop carries a large variety of ultra-premium extra virgin olive oils, balsamic vinegars and specialty foods, giving customers the opportunity to taste products before making a purchase. Our staff can make recommendations for recipes and pairings to create unique... 
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  • Recipe and its origin: Ratatouille with Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Succinctly defined, Ratatouille is a traditional French Provencal vegetable stew.
    But that simplifies this delicious dish, which has a complicated history, carries much debate on its best preparation, and, for many, is most closely associated with the 2007 Disney animated movie which bears its name.

    Ratatouille is all of these things, but, most important, this dish is a crowning glory to several of nature’s tastiest vegetables.

    Let’s start with the name, which is an expressive derivation of the French verb “touiller,” meaning “to stir up.” And Ratatouille is indeed a flavorful stirring up of its primary and standard ingredients: tomatoes, onion, bell pepper, zucchini, eggplant, squash, garlic and a smattering of assorted herbs and spices.

    RATATOUILLE

    (The ingredients should be cooked in batches, then combined)

    ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 medium-size eggplant, peeled and cut into ½-inch pieces
    1/3 clove garlic, minced
    A pinch of salt and a grind of pepper
    * * * *
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2 yellow squash, cut into ½-inch pieces
    2 zucchini, cut into ½-inch pieces
    1/3 clove garlic, minced
    A pinch of salt and a grind of pepper
    * * * *
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    1 large onion, cut into ½-inch pieces
    1 bell pepper, cored, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    1/3 clove garlic, minced
    A pinch of sale and a grind of pepper
    * * * *
    5 tomatoes, finely chopped
    1 cup of fresh basil leaves, shredded and loosely packed
    1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
    1 teaspoon lemon juice

    DIRECTIONS

    Heat the ¼ cup of olive oil, add the eggplant, and cook, stirring over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes.
    Add the garlic, salt and pepper and cook for another minute
    Spoon the eggplant onto a plate and set aside
    Put 2 tablespoons olive oil into the same pot, add the squash and zucchini, and cook over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes.
    Add the garlic, salt and pepper and cook for another minute.
    Spoon the squash and zucchini onto a plate and keep aside.
    Put 2 tablespoons olive oil into the same pot. Add the onion and bell pepper and cook until softened, about 7-8 minutes.
    Add the remaining garlic, salt and pepper and cook for another minute.
    Add the chopped tomatoes, the reserved, already-cooked vegetables, and the shredded basil.
    Cook about 15 minutes or until the tomatoes have broken down and the vegetables are tender. Stir in the zest and lemon juice.
    If desired, sprinkle a little crumbled goat cheese on top of each serving.

    Ratatouille origin is debatable.

    I tend to look at Ratatouille as a dish with three probable lives. The first is pre-historic, going back to the discovery of fire and the creation of the first liquid-proof vessel. These combined enabled man to cook the first stew, whatever its ingredients might have been at that time.

    We know from culinary history that it didn’t include tomatoes or zucchini, which had yet to find their way into Europe from the Americas. And eggplant, back then, was exclusive to India.

    Nonetheless, there was some sort of stew, and that was a start.

    Next, its second life brought forth Ratatouille as we know it today, created from a proliferation of seasonal vegetables in the Mediterranean. The French claim the full, official name is Ratatouille Nicoise, reflecting a wide belief that the dish originated in Nice in the South of France.

    Curiously, though generally considered a signature Provencal dish, Nice is not geographically in Provence, a little detail that residents elect to overlook. Others claim that Ratatouille might well have come from adjacent parts of Italy and Spain, and, from there, crept into France.

    Finally, and less seriously, Ratatouille gained recognition and some popularity as a result of the animated Disney movie of the same name, which debuted in 2007 and won an Oscar the following year. Though this introduced Ratatouille to the less-food-conscious, it’s odd that the recipe and end-product featured in the film, and created by renowned consulting chef Thomas Keller, was far more elaborate, refined and time-consuming than the peasant-based real thing,

    Nonetheless, the movie served to promote this deserving dish.

    Beyond its history, there is endless debate on how to make a traditional Ratatouille. There are three schools of thought on the subject. One, saute all the vegetables together. Two, layer then bake them like a casserole (Julia Child’s preference). And three, saute each ingredient separately, then combine and simmer them together.

    As the accompanying recipe shows, I prefer the latter. I find a comforting vote of confidence in this technique from noted chef Joel Robouchon who wrote in his cookbook, “The secret of a good Ratatouille is to cook the vegetables separately so each will taste truly of itself.” In other words, you will savor individual flavors and still enjoy the complexity of their combination.

    Usually, Ratatouille is served as a side dish, but topping pasta with it makes a good, hearty meal. Also, a generous serving, either hot or cold, makes a nice lunch, accompanied with good French bread and perhaps a small green salad. For some added zip, you could sprinkle the top of each serving with crumbled goat cheese. But, however you serve it, I can think of no better way to enjoy vegetables.

    Source

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    Succinctly defined, Ratatouille is a traditional French Provencal vegetable stew. But that simplifies this delicious dish, which has a complicated history, carries much debate on its best preparation, and, for many, is most closely associated with the 2007 Disney animated movie... 
    Read More →
  • Report from the frontline of the olive harvest in Italy

    The olive branch may traditionally be associated with peace, but in a small corner of Abruzzo, Italy, this noble crop is also the harbinger of warmth, vitamin C and a hearty dose of antioxidants.

    I’ve come to the outskirts of Casoli, a beautiful rustic area in one of Italy’s most unexplored regions, where the centuries-old cultivation of olives has taken on a new and exciting twist, in the form of tea.

    Perched precariously on a sheer cliff overlooking a rugged valley and flanked by slate-grey mountains sporting a year-round dusting of snow, the ‘headquarters’ of Mirabilia Olive Leaf Tea is a rustic Abruzzan house nestled amid thousands of olive trees, encircled by creeping kiwi vines and sprays of fragrant wild herbs. Here, organic olive leaves, traditionally used in antibacterial and antimalarial remedies, are hand-picked, dried and crushed to form a sweet, coppery brew that is high in antioxidants and vitamin C, free from caffeine and tannin, and subtly fragrant.

    Women from the local community gather regularly to transform this ancient tree into a warming, healthy liquor by meticulously stripping the branches of their leaves, sometimes combining them with the fat, glowing pomegranates that grow wild by the roadside, or fragrant shards of organic lemon peel and furls of local wild mint.

    This revival of tradition makes perfect sense in a region where the olive has been cultivated for more than 2000 years and is still integral to the local economy. During late October, all energy is devoted to the harvest, a physically demanding endeavour that, predictably, is accomplished with apparent ease by the sprightly local women with their special gloves and baskets but which leaves foreigners sweating in the sun. Olives are raked from the trees using giant combs, or shaken from the branches on to huge green nets, which are then gathered up and taken to the local co-operative for pressing into a piquant extra-virgin oil to be drizzled liberally over the local cuisine.

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    The olive branch may traditionally be associated with peace, but in a small corner of Abruzzo, Italy, this noble crop is also the harbinger of warmth, vitamin C and a hearty dose of antioxidants. I’ve come to the outskirts of Casoli, a beautiful rustic area in one of Italy’s... 
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  • Is this olive oil the most political food in the world?

    Manal Ramadan founded Zaytoun after seeing the problems Palestinian farmers faced in getting a fair price for their olive oil. Olive oil was Zaytoun’s first product – 10 years later it has won several awards and remains its flagship.

    It’s been said that olive oil from the West Bank is the most political food in the world, and I think I’d agree. Zaytoun started in 2004 as a volunteer-led initiative by a group of friends inspired by a trip to Palestine. We had spent time with olive farmers, enjoying their wonderful hospitality and tasting some of the most delicious olive oil we’d ever had. But their livelihoods were being threatened because they had to sell below the cost of production due to restrictions imposed by the Israeli occupation. Zaytoun was an opportunity to help.

    One of the biggest challenges is the restriction on the movement of people and goods. Olive, almond, herb and grain producers are located around Nablus, Jenin and Salfit, and the medjool date producers around Jericho. Most goods are shipped from the port of Haifa, about an hour’s drive away from most of the producers, but in reality it takes several hours, sometimes days, to get there because vehicles are forced to make big detours to go through the checkpoints, and pallets have to be stacked far lower than capacity to allow sniffer dogs to jump over them. For the farmers, it would probably be faster to travel to London than to Haifa.

    Farming is difficult everywhere, but few places have the additional challenges of land seizures, illegal settlements, difficulty of movement and farmers losing land or being unable to access land due to the separation barrier. The devastation in Gaza last year also resulted in curfews, house searches, raids and arrests in the West Bank.

    Manal Ramadan: ‘For thousands of farming families in Palestine, fair trade has given them the security of knowing they can sell their crops for a price guaranteed to be above the cost of production.’ Photograph: Claudia Janke/Guardian

    But for thousands of farming families in Palestine, fair trade has given them the security of knowing they can sell their crops for a price guaranteed to be above the cost of production. Farmer co-ops receive a premium that funds community projects, and increased demand for products traditionally produced by women’s co-ops has given them scope to develop business skills and work strategically.

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    Manal Ramadan founded Zaytoun after seeing the problems Palestinian farmers faced in getting a fair price for their olive oil. Olive oil was Zaytoun’s first product – 10 years later it has won several awards and remains its flagship. It’s been said that olive oil from... 
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  • IOC Report on Olive Oil Producer Prices

    Graph 1 tracks the weekly movements in the prices paid to producers for extra virgin olive oil in the three top EU producing countries plus Tunisia while Graph 3 shows the weekly changes in the producer prices for refined olive oil in the three main EU producers.

    The monthly price movements for the same two grades of oil are given in Graphs 2 & 4.

    Extra virgin olive oil: In June 2014, producer prices in Spain started to rise constantly. In October the market seemed to be searching for equilibrium in that prices fell but in the following two months they reversed direction, reaching €3.12/kg by the end of December. This is the highest level yet in the period under review and is 55 pc higher than a year earlier and 59 pc higher than the low recorded in May 2014 (€1.96/kg) (Graph 1).

    Italy: In recent months, producer prices in Italy have been on a very clear upward trend. In the week from 10 to 16 November 2014, they hit the highest level of both the period under review and the last decade, reaching €6.79/kg. This price hike was probably prompted by the forecasts of a lower-than-usual harvest.

    The IOC does not know the volume of product sold at these prices.

    After a small dip in the second last week of December, prices switched back upwards to reach €5.55/kg at the end of December 2014, equating with an increase of 109 pc on a year earlier and 110 pc compared with the low recorded in the second week of December 2013 (€2.64/kg). Graph 2 shows how the monthly prices of extra virgin olive oil have changed in recent crop years.

    Greece: After holding steady at €2.51/kg through July and August 2014, producer prices in Greece climbed for several weeks. They then declined at the beginning of October only to peak in the next two months. At the end of December 2014, they stood at €2.91/kg, thus showing 18 pc growth on the same period of 2012/13.

    Tunisia: At the end of October 2013, producers were paid €2.53/kg for their extra virgin olive oil. Prices then started moving downwards until late December 2013, when they levelled off after some fluctuations. By the end of December 2014 they were lying at €2.73/kg (+22 pc compared with a year earlier) and they have remained at this level for the last two weeks.

    Refined olive oil: Producer prices for refined olive oil moved up in a similar upward direction in Spain and Italy from June 2014. In Spain they dipped slightly in the last two weeks of September 2014, then picking up again only to fall slightly to €2.66/kg by the end of December 2014.

    Despite this dip, this price level is 41 pc higher than in the same period of 2012/13. In Italy, while prices have been moving in parallel with those in Spain, they did peak in the third week of January 2014 (€2.83/kg).

    At the end of December, prices were hovering around €2.75/kg, translating into a period-on-period increase of 27 pc which restores Italian prices to their usual position above Spanish prices.

    No price data are available for this product category in Greece.

    At the end of December 2014, the price of refined olive oil and extra virgin olive oil in Spain differed by €0.46/kg, with €2.66/kg being paid for the first category and €3.12/kg for the second.

    In Italy, the difference in price between the two categories is quite a lot wider than in Spain (€2.80/kg – Graph 3).

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    Source: International Olive Council – Newsletter N89

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    Graph 1 tracks the weekly movements in the prices paid to producers for extra virgin olive oil in the three top EU producing countries plus Tunisia while Graph 3 shows the weekly changes in the producer prices for refined olive oil in the three main EU producers. The monthly... 
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  • World market for olive oil and table olives in 2013/14

     1. WORLD OLIVE OIL MARKET
    At the close of the 2013/14 crop year (October 2013–September 2014), imports of olive oil and olive pomace oil by the seven countries listed in the table below showed a season-on-season increase in the cases of Canada (+10 pc), the United States (+5 pc), Japan (+4 pc) and Australia (+1 pc) and decreases for China (-15 pc) and Brazil (-2 pc). Data for Russia are only available up to April 2014, i.e. for the first seven months of the crop year, and reflect an increase of 8 pc in imports.

    Intra-EU imports recorded a season-on-season increase of 17 pc while extra-EU imports fell by 62 pc. This cumulative fall in extra-EU imports seems logical given the high level of Spain’s production in 2013/14.

    2. WORLD TABLE OLIVE MARKET IN 2013/14
    At the end of the 2013/14 crop year (October 2013–September 2014) table olive imports by the five countries listed in the table had increased by 5 pc in Brazil, 0.4 pc in Canada and 1 pc in Australia versus 2012/13 while they had dropped by 5 pc in the United States. Again the data for Russia are only available up to April 2014, i.e. for the first seven months of the season and show a drop of 12 pc.

    The EU data for September 2014 were not available at the time of writing but in the first eleven months of the crop year, intra-EU acquisitions dropped by 9 pc while imports from non-EU countries increased by 13 pc.

    Source: International Olive Council – Newsletter N89

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     1. WORLD OLIVE OIL MARKET At the close of the 2013/14 crop year (October 2013–September 2014), imports of olive oil and olive pomace oil by the seven countries listed in the table below showed a season-on-season increase in the cases of Canada (+10 pc), the United States... 
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  • Spotlight on Olive Oil imports by the United States in 2013/14

    At the close of the 2013/14 crop year, imports by the United States, the world’s top importer of olive oil, totalled 312 557.80 t and were 5 pc higher than in 2012/13.

    Table 1 itemises US imports by country of origin. As can be seen, EU countries recorded a 15-point gain in their share of the US total, which went up from 71 pc in 2012/13 to 86 pc in 2013/2014 driven by high production in Spain.

    Accounting for 44 pc of total US imports, Italy is still the lead supplier although it has lost ground in volume and percentage terms.

    Spain lies in second place (40 pc). For the reason already explained, Spanish exports to the US soared by 111 pc in volume terms and by 20 points in percentage terms.

    Greece, on the other hand, had a bad harvest in 2013/14; as a result, its market share narrowed by 0.7 points versus 2012/13 and lies at a very low level of 1.8 pc.

    By volume, Tunisia is the third biggest supplier of the US market, although with only a 5 pc share in 2013/14 (7 points down on 2012/13) because of its small harvest.

    Argentina is next in fourth position (2.8 pc), followed by Turkey and Chile, which together with the other countries listed make up the rest of US imports.

    Chart I plots the trend of US imports through the last 24 crop years. To sum up, the biggest change in 2013/14 has been Spain’s sharp gain in market share, probably prompted by the steep increase in Spanish production that season and the growing demand for bulk imports (this aspect is reported in the next section and will be dealt with in detail in the next issue).

    According to the customs data and categories reported for 2013/14, extra virgin olive oil was the top category and therefore the one in greatest demand.

    With a volume of 153 200.7 t, it accounted for 49 pc of the total, 34 pc of which was imported in containers under 18 kg (104 768.4 t) (see Chart I).

    The remaining 15 pc (48 432.3 t) was imported in bulk, i.e. in containers > 18 kg (Chart II).

    Organic extra virgin olive oil cornered 11 pc (34 470.0 t) of total imports, of which 7 pc (20 683.9 t) was packed and 4 pc (13 786.4 t) was bulk.

    Virgin olive oil took a 4 pc share (10 875.3 t) of the total and was almost all delivered in containers > 18 kg.

    Organic virgin olive oil accounted for only 1 pc of the total. Charts I and II show the imports of the different categories of virgin olive oil by type of container.

    There has been no change in the reporting format of the other categories of oil (olive oil under 150990 and olive pomace oil under 151000).

    Source: International Olive Council – Newsletter N89

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    At the close of the 2013/14 crop year, imports by the United States, the world’s top importer of olive oil, totalled 312 557.80 t and were 5 pc higher than in 2012/13. Table 1 itemises US imports by country of origin. As can be seen, EU countries recorded a 15-point gain in... 
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  • Olive leaf extract may help in treating ailments

    Today, we are extracting some powerful medicines from plants from all over the world. The olive is one plant that may hint at some of the extraordinary abilities God may have built into some of the extinct plants. We’ve all heard about the health effects of olive oil. However, it turns out the olive leaf also provides some very healthy extracts.

    One extract, oleuropein, found in all parts of the olive plant, has been shown to delay the formation of poisons formed by mold growing in nut meal. It can also stop the growth of one type of staphylococcus. Other studies suggest this extract may relax the smooth muscles of artery walls, temporarily lowering blood pressure. In addition, it may help the heart function better and inhibit the formation of clogging plaques in the bloodstream. Other extracts from the olive leaf have been shown not only to be antioxidants, but also to slow the production of poisons or even destroy certain bacteria.

    Olive leaf extract is also thought to be effective in helping the body to routinely combat numerous pathogens as well as help restore a flagging immune system. It can destroy many pathogens such as viruses, fungi, bacteria, etc. by interfering with their ability to replicate, which prevents them from spreading. In addition, researchers found that olive leaf extract also helps to destroy viruses by stimulating the body’s immune system to produce more disease-fighting cells.

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    Today, we are extracting some powerful medicines from plants from all over the world. The olive is one plant that may hint at some of the extraordinary abilities God may have built into some of the extinct plants. We’ve all heard about the health effects of olive oil. However,... 
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  • Expert Study: How much should cost extra virgin olive oil?

    The world olive oil sector generates a turnover between 6 500 and 11 000 million euros per crop year and provides a livelihood for more 30 million people in 7 million households. Olives are grown on 11 million hectares of land in 47 producer countries dotted across the five continents.

    At present, olive oil is consumed in more than 160 countries.

    According to the data for the 2012 crop year, 3.1 million tonnes of olive oil are produced and consumed compared with 184 million tonnes of all edible oils and fats, of which 24 million are of animal origin. Put differently, olive oil accounts for 1.7 pc of all edible vegetable and animal fats.

    These figures show that world olive oil production is a strategic economic sector and an influential player in the international arena. It is also a sector where production and consumption have their own idiosyncratic characteristics.

    The objective of the five-part study has been to ascertain the cost of producing one kilogram of virgin olive oil, expressed in euros, in different olive cultivation systems. The first part deals with the methodology and covers the analysis of the different cultivation systems proposed, the preparation of the survey questionnaires, the analysis of the results and other aspects. A description is then given of olive oil production in the participant countries in the study on the basis of a series of figures permitting a comprehensive sectoral diagnosis.

    The first step was to classify world olive growing into seven different cultivation systems:

    S1: Traditional rainfed on steep slopes
    S2: Traditional irrigated on steep slopes
    S3: Traditional rainfed on moderate slopes
    S4: Traditional irrigated on moderate slopes
    S5: Intensive rainfed
    S6: Intensive irrigated
    S7: Superintensive irrigated

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    The world olive oil sector generates a turnover between 6 500 and 11 000 million euros per crop year and provides a livelihood for more 30 million people in 7 million households. Olives are grown on 11 million hectares of land in 47 producer countries dotted across the five continents. At... 
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  • Liter of virgin olive oil could rise 50 percent in price, experts say

    The price of a liter of Italian olive oil rose 121 percent year-on-year in December 2014, according to a recent report by researchers at the commodities analytics firm Mintec.

    Mintec predicts a rise of up to 50 percent in coming months for extra-virgin olive oil in most markets.

    Globally, olive oil of every type has risen in price about 40 percent in the past year, the report says, and Mintec expects the price to keep going up in 2015.

    What will this cost Turkish consumers?

    The price is set to rise by up to 20 Turkish lira per liter, according to research by the consultancy Olive Oil World.

    This raises critical issues for Turkish producers. The head of the Union of Aegean Olive and Olive Oil Exporters, Gurkan Renkilag, told The Anadolu Agency that Turkey risks losing foreign markets for its olive oil.

    “You can buy olive oil for less than €3.62 from producers in Turkey,” he added. That makes Turkish olive oil prices one euro higher than those of other European markets.

    Article source

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    The price of a liter of Italian olive oil rose 121 percent year-on-year in December 2014, according to a recent report by researchers at the commodities analytics firm Mintec. Mintec predicts a rise of up to 50 percent in coming months for extra-virgin olive oil in most markets.... 
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  • Greek Extra Virgin Olive Oil Prices Drop Despite Demand

    Prices of Greek extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) are dropping despite shortages in the 2014 harvest season of other major producers like Spain, France, Italy and Turkey.

    Even though Greeks are consuming an impressive 18 kilos per capita a year, the biggest consumption in the world, most of Greek EVOO produced is exported to Italy. And while Greek olive mills were getting 3.50-4.00 euros per kilo in November, Italian buyers are willing to pay a maximum of 3.20 euros per kilo in December, according to the Olive Oil Times.

    This year’s harvest in Greece was below average in several regions. Heavy rains, strong winds, even a twister, hit olive producers hard in key areas such as the Peloponnese, Volos and Agrinio. This has forced many producers to sell at low prices to cover their costs.

    Greek olive oil mills and wholesalers sell to Italy at bulk to make a quick turnaround. However, they don’t use part of their profit to promote and market Greek EVOO internationally. As a result, Greek olive oil doesn’t have as strong reputation as the Spanish or Italian.

    Greek EEVO producers put the blame on the economic crisis. But the root of the problem is that the Greek state has done next to nothing to protect pricing and promote Greek olive oil abroad. Also, even though subsidies are given to olive growers, there is very little control over how they are used.

    Italy, on the other hand, has invested heavily on marketing and promotion, and Italian EVOO has a worldwide reputation and the largest market share. Italian olive oil producers have also promoted agrotourism with great results. The irony is that Italy needs Greek EEVO to maintain its reputation.

    There are no similar efforts in Greece. Agricultural and gastronomic tourism are almost non-existent. Very few of the millions of tourists visiting Greece every year have the opportunity to taste fine EVOO or other quality agricultural products.

    Greece has another strong competitor in the olive oil business. Tunisia is the new power in the field, with 46 companies exporting bottled olive oil. Targeting big markets like the U.S. and Europe, the Tunisian olive oil industry is state-aided by zero value added tax. This year, Tunisia will produce an estimated 300,000 tons, an amount that almost equals, or surpasses, Greek and Italian output. And Tunisia sells at less than 3 euros per kilogram.

    Another factor Greek prices are dropping is the growing concern over EEVO adulteration. This year, some Greek olive oil companies began importing repaso olive oil from Spain. Repaso is the process of passing the olive paste waste through the centrifuge a second time with hot water. This way, the remainder of olive oil left behind in the olive paste is extracted. Some Greek producers mix it with EEVO; something that Italian producers have been accused of for years. Greek legislation prohibits mills to produce repaso oil.

    The “Hellenization” of Spanish repaso olive oil was suspected to be the main reason prices of Greek EVOO have dropped, according to Olive Oil Times. The Greek government has pledged to strengthen controls to protect the quality of local olive oil.

    Article source

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    Prices of Greek extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) are dropping despite shortages in the 2014 harvest season of other major producers like Spain, France, Italy and Turkey. Even though Greeks are consuming an impressive 18 kilos per capita a year, the biggest consumption in the world,... 
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  • Queen Creek Olive Mill - agrotourismo olive farm in Arizona

    In my next life, I want to come back as an olive farmer. This is what I decided after visiting the Queen Creek Olive Mill, where the fascinating world of olive harvesting was opened up to me, comments Katka Lapelosovà.

    Existing as Arizona’s first working olive farm and mill, Perry and Brenda Rea provide pesticide-free olive oil products to people from around the world. Each year they reveal a specialty product; 2014 saw a pumpkin spice-infused olive oil, a delicious blend of fall flavors to spice up salads, or drizzle over waffles.

    They incorporate their passion into everything that goes on at the farm, especially when it comes to educating the public on olive oil and its many uses. I even tried cupcakes baked with the farm’s own infused oils. There really isn’t anything a good bottle of olive oil can’t make better.

    Foodies will drool over the extensive selection of products the farm has to offer. Those looking to kick their cooking up a notch will enjoy tasting original infusions, such as chili, vanilla bean, and bacon (all products are also 100% vegan. Yes, even the bacon olive oil).

    More conventional flavors, like traditional extra-virgin, rosemary, or garlic, are also available, along with homemade dressings, balsamic vinegars, and dipping sauces. A special line of beauty products featuring olive oil as a key ingredient also make for great gifts.

    Queen Creek Olive Mill STORY…

    What started out as a warm getaway from the chilly Detroit weather, actually turned out to be one of the most influential trips Perry and Brenda Rea ever decided to embark on. In 1997, the Detroit couple decided to visit the Valley of the Sun, and was surprised to see the abundance of olive trees growing around the Phoenix area.

    Intrigued and excited upon the discovery, and with some red wine inspiration, the couple had an idea. As a child to first generation Italian immigrants, Perry was exposed to olive oil and its significance in the kitchen at a young age. Why not take advantage of the fruitful environment of the Valley and produce olive oil himself?

    With the support of his wife, the couple left Detroit in 1998, and relocated with their four children (and one on the way) to Phoenix, Arizona. Going into the project, with the intentions of producing olive oil solely as a hobby, 1,000 olive trees were planted on 100 acres in the city of Queen Creek. With the idea of providing the Arizona community with fresh, local, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Perry and Brenda built a 5,000 square foot shed, which eventually transformed into the Queen Creek Olive Mill you see today.

    After two successful years of selling oil to the community, the Rea family wanted to offer something more. The product line was enlarged, increasing the number of cold pressed oils, vinegars, tapenades, and stuffed olives. A small café was built inside of the building, to provide guests a taste of the possibilities one can create with local products. The goal was to create an agriturismo atmosphere, allowing Queen Creek Olive Mill to become more of a destination and experience, rather than simply a store.

    Perry and Brenda have created an olive oil empire in Arizona, supplying the Valley and its surrounding cities with farm fresh, local food and Extra Virgin Olive Oil. With the addition of three new retail stores across Arizona, Queen Creek Olive Mill makes it possible for customers to have access to the highest quality Extra Virgin Olive Oil, while keeping it local.

    Farm
    Queen Creek Olive Mill is home to home to 7,500 olive trees on a 120 acre farm in Queen Creek, Arizona. Because of the hot Arizona heat, we have no natural pests and therefore are a 100% pesticide free farm. Our grove uses environmental friendly (drip) irrigation methods, and our olives are hand-harvested. Queen Creek Olive Mill has made it a priority to harvest and press our olives at the perfect time in order to create our signature
    Tuscan Estate Extra Virgin Olive Oils.

    We harvest our olives in the fall, specifically, September through December. The earlier the olives are harvested, the more grassy a flavor they yield, while the olives harvested in the later months produce more of a fruity/buttery tasting oil. With this knowledge, our olives are hand-harvested from the tree at the exact moment necessary to create our delectable blend.

    In order to guarantee the freshest oil, all of our olives are pressed within 24 hours of harvest. In other words, our olives go directly from tree to press, there is no lag or travel time.

    “Fresh olives give you fresh oil, it’s as simple as that!” . . . Perry Rea, Owner

    For more information on the Olive Mill go to
    www.QueenCreekOliveMill.com

    Queen Creek Olive Mill
    25062 S. Meridian Road
    Queen Creek, Arizona 85142

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    Sources article by Katka Lapelosovà & www.QueenCreekOliveMill.com

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    In my next life, I want to come back as an olive farmer. This is what I decided after visiting the Queen Creek Olive Mill, where the fascinating world of olive harvesting was opened up to me, comments Katka Lapelosovà. Existing as Arizona’s first working olive farm and... 
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  • DNAtrax tracks tainted olive oil and other food with molecular bar code

    LLNL physical chemist George Farquar, who led the team that invented DNATrax, demonstrates how the product can be applied to food.

    According to the US Center for Disease Control (CDC), 129,000 Americans are sent to hospital and 3,000 die each year from food poisoning. Currently, tracing contaminated food is largely a matter of record keeping and detective work, but Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers, in partnership with DNATrek, have developed DNATrax, a DNA-based additive for directly tracking food from producer to consumer.

    Food poisoning due to outbreaks is a major problem, putting thousands of lives at risk, wasting tons of recalled foodstuffs, with US$70 billion dollars lost in the US alone each year. The problem is that current methods of tracing outbreaks are inefficient, time consuming and imprecise because they rely on what is essentially a combination of accountancy, interviews, and logical deduction to trace contaminated foods back along what is often an incomplete trail. That’s where DNATrax comes in

    Originally designed for bio-defense work, DNATrax was created as a way to simulate germ warfare attacks on indoor and outdoor targets. The conventional way of determining the weak spots in targets ranging from underground rail systems to the Pentagon is to spray harmless bacteria into the air, later collect samples from various places, then incubate them to see how the bacteria has spread. With DNATrax, the bacteria is replaced by particles of non-biological DNA that can be collected with simple forensic swabs and then subjected to DNA analysis. The application of food tracking was an unexpected bonus.

    DNATrax is surprisingly simple. It’s an odorless, tasteless substance that’s classified as a harmless food additive by the US Food and Drug Administration. It’s made of strands of non-living and non-viable DNA encased in sugars similar to common icing sugar. These strands, like all DNA, can record information and have 1060 variations, so they can contain a lot of data that, according to LLNL, acts like “an invisible barcode.”

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    Applying DNATrax is simply a matter of spraying it on fruits, vegetables and meats, or mixing it in with bulk commodities like honey, olive oil, flour, or rice. The idea is to use the DNA to record a code sequence with data such as what the product is, where it came from, when it was harvested and so on. Then simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology can identify the code and reveal the origin of the product in about an hour, right down to which tree a particular apple came from.

    Aside from tracking down contaminated food, LLNL says that DNATrax can also help combat food piracy. Most people have heard of movie or music piracy and may have come across a dodgy “Rolex” down the market, but piracy is actually a major problem for almost all commerce – including food. Called wastage, grocery shelves are constantly invaded by everything from fake corn flakes to counterfeit honey selling under false labels, to adulterated wines and olive oils mixing the premium with the cheap stuff. Since such label swapping and adulteration does not occur where the food is produced, but somewhere down the line, DNATrax can identify fraudulent foods as well as how many adulterants have been added, how much, and where they came from.

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    LLNL physical chemist George Farquar, who led the team that invented DNATrax, demonstrates how the product can be applied to food. According to the US Center for Disease Control (CDC), 129,000 Americans are sent to hospital and 3,000 die each year from food poisoning. Currently,... 
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