Daily Archives: January 11, 2015

  • Refined oil VS Filtered oil – which is healthier?

    We consume cooking oil almost every day in our major meals. But do we put in adequate thoughts in selecting the right kind? How often do you read the label or see how pure the oil is? There are different varieties of oil in the market. The two distinct choices are – refined and filtered. Dietician Neha Chandna helps decode which is the healthier option.

    What are filtered oils?

    Filtered oils are oils filtered through strainers or others equipments to remove the solid particles and contaminants from the oil but no chemicals are used in the process. They are generally dark and cloudy in appearance and have a peculiar seed smell from which they are extracted.

    What are refined oils?

    Refined oils are generally treated with chemicals to further rid the oil from impurities, odour and give it a more clear appearance. Most oils sold in the market are refined oils. Also read – is your cooking oil making you unhealthy?

    Are filtered oils better than refined ones?

    Filtered oils are better than refined ones as they are less processed and treated hence have a higher value of nutrients in them. Refined oils are devoid of beta carotene, vitamin E and minerals.

    Another benefit of using filtered oil is that since they have a strong aroma, they are used in lesser amounts helping you manage weight and lipid levels better. They also contain higher amount of vitamins and minerals which add to your overall nutrient intake.

    Explains celeb nutritionist Rujuta Diwekar in her YouTube video that filtered oils are healthier as they are produced at a lower temperature so the nutrients are retained and the fatty acid bonds do not become toxic. In case of refined oils, the process is done at a much higher temperature so the oil does not retain any of its natural flavour or taste.

    She also adds that to filter oil you need only the best grade of seed which isn’t the case in refined oils as any seed even if it has gone bad can be used in this process. Do you reuse oil? Here’s why it is dangerous.

    Which one is better-suited for Indian style of cooking?

    Filtered oils have a strong aroma which may overpower the flavour of the food. Therefore most people opt for refined oils for cooking. If you get used to the taste of filtered oils, you can opt for them as they are healthier.

    Which is the best filtered oil one can use?

    For cooking Indian dishes you can use filtered sunflower or safflower oil and for salads you can opt for filtered olive oil. But avoid frying foods in this oil as it can change the taste of the food being fried. If you are unable to find filtered version of sunflower oil, you can opt for any nut-based filtered oil such as coconut, groundnut, mustard, etc. Read 5 cooking oil myths busted.

    So are you ready to make the switch to filtered oils for your health’s sake?

    Article source Health Site

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    We consume cooking oil almost every day in our major meals. But do we put in adequate thoughts in selecting the right kind? How often do you read the label or see how pure the oil is? There are different varieties of oil in the market. The two distinct choices are – refined... 
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  • Vatican farm with 800-year-old olive trees will be open to the public

    It makes sense that the Pope Francis who took his name from the patron saint of animals would be an animal lover. So, it comes as no surprise that Pope Francis has decided to open up the 50-acre Vatican farm at Castel Gandolfo to the public.

    The property, which is located 15 miles outside of Rome (that’s right, the Pope adheres to a 15-mile diet), has been a summer vacation home for the Popes since the 16th century. Placed among Roman ruins, beautiful villas and breathtaking views of the Tyrrhenian Sea, the farm was established by Pope Pius XI in the 1930s and has been providing meat, dairy and produce to the Popes ever since.

    The decision to open up the farm was praised by the public, just like his move early last year to open up the gardens at Castel Gandolfo, which have been visited by more than 8,000 people.

    The farm, which employs eight people—one of whom has worked there for 33 years and served four popes—contains 800-year-old olive trees that produce more than 300 gallons of olive oil annually.

    Eighty cows and several donkeys supply the papal residence with milk, cheese, butter and yogurt. There is a sprawling vegetable garden, a greenhouse and ostriches, rabbits, chickens and turkeys. A van delivers food such as eggs, vegetables, yogurt, honey, cheese and olive oil to the Vatican every day.

    The excess produce is sold in Rome supermarkets, which allows the farm to be self-sustaining.

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    It makes sense that the Pope Francis who took his name from the patron saint of animals would be an animal lover. So, it comes as no surprise that Pope Francis has decided to open up the 50-acre Vatican farm at Castel Gandolfo to the public. The property, which is located 15... 
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  • St. Paul’s Hospital in Canada to launch Mediterranean diet course for the public

    St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver is making plans to train hundreds, if not thousands, of people to eat according to the principles of the life-saving Mediterranean diet.

    “Truly changing the way you eat is a massive undertaking,” said physician Andrew Ignaszewski, who is head of cardiology at the hospital. “For people with a northern European or Eastern European pedigree, the Mediterranean diet does not come naturally, the specifics are not intuitive and need to be taught.”

    The course is likely to include educational seminars, group counselling and regular support sessions spread over at least a year, including shopping excursions and cooking instruction.

    Buoyed by the stunning results of a rare long-term diet study conducted with almost 8,000 subjects in Spain, Ignaszewski and his colleagues felt they could help more than just their cardiac patients.

    “There are 10 times more people at risk of cardiovascular disease than people who have been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease,” said Ignaszewski.

    The study, published last year by the New England Journal of Medicine, placed healthy people at risk of cardiac disease into three groups: a simple low-fat diet, a relatively high-fat Mediterranean diet supplemented with large amounts of extra virgin olive oil, and a Mediterranean diet supplemented with large amounts of walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts.

    Over five years, the two Mediterranean diet groups had a 30-per-cent lower chance of heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular disease than people on the low-fat diet.

    Such randomized control trial studies are rare and very difficult to execute over a long period of time, but the researchers met regularly with participants and even conducted urine and blood tests to ensure people were complying with the diet they were assigned.

    “Cardiologists live and die by evidence based medicine and once in a while a study comes along that changes our practice,” said Ignaszewski, who called the effect produced by the researchers “huge.”

    “This lifestyle change had the same effect on their relative risk as the most potent medications,” he said. Because the level of physical activity and subjects’ weight was unchanged across all three groups, what people ate was the critical factor, rather than weight loss or exercise.

    Ignaszewski noted the irony that people in the low-fat control group, who had the worst health outcomes, were given the same advice that most cardiac patients receive in North America.

    Low-fat diets designed to lower cholesterol — pushed by doctors and others for decades in North America — have also had the unfortunate side-effect of fuelling an epidemic of diabetes, he said.

    Training people how to eat differently requires a long-term intervention, which is what the new course at St. Paul’s is designed to do.

    It is not enough to tell people to eat more fish and legumes, olive oil and nuts. For every new food that is added, other foods must be eliminated, Ignaszewski said.

    “You need to learn what to eat, day by day, three meals a day,” he said. “For the study subjects in Spain it was relatively easy, many of these things were already part of their diet, in North America it will be much tougher.”

    St. Paul’s Hospital will host a free information session in late January for people who indicate their interest be emailing predimed@providencehealth.bc.ca.

    Article source

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    St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver is making plans to train hundreds, if not thousands, of people to eat according to the principles of the life-saving Mediterranean diet. “Truly changing the way you eat is a massive undertaking,” said physician Andrew Ignaszewski, who is... 
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