Monthly Archives: December 2014

  • How to make a healthy salad dressing with Olive Oil

    The key to making a healthy salad dressing isn’t hidden in any secret recipe.

    The trick is knowing what ingredients make up a healthy salad dressing and the learning to mix those ingredients in a way that treats your personal food preference. Keep in mind you’ll probably need a blender for many of these ingredients.

    Tofu:
    You might not think tofu has a place when it comes to a healthy salad dressing, but tofu can be the secret ingredient if you want a healthy, creamy dressing. Tofu will give dressing substance like cheeses or mayonnaise would but won’t carry all the calories or fat. Tofu can be mixed with small amounts of low-fat cottage cheese and low-fat flavorful cheese (like blue cheese) for a creamy topping.

    Vinegar:
    This is a staple when it comes to homemade salad dressings, but the fun thing about vinegar is that it can be purchased in a variety of flavors. Raspberry vinegar, for example, can be used with oil (also can be flavored) or low-fat buttermilk to create the base for a light but tasty dressing.

    Olive Oil:
    Olive Oil is one of those ingredients you have to think carefully about. Oil will add calories, but if you use healthy oil, like extra virgin olive oil, there are health benefits to be had. Healthy oils are one of the staples in the Mediterranean diet, known as the world’s healthiest eating routine. The Mayo Clinic indicates olive oil may help lower cholesterol, improve blood sugar regulation and may improve blood clotting. There are many other natural oils out there; don’t be afraid to experiment.

    Lime or lemon juice:
    Lime or lemon juice–depending on personal taste–can be used to thin the consistency of dressings, oil-based or creamy. These two juices also add their own acidic flavor to prevent dressing from becoming too sweet.

    Herbs and spices:
    This is where you can really individualize when it comes to your salad dressing. While there are herbs and spices that seem like staples in dressing: basil, garlic cilantro, pepper, etc., you can use whatever herbs and spices you want.

    Source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.9/10 (66 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -4 (from 20 votes)
    The key to making a healthy salad dressing isn’t hidden in any secret recipe. The trick is knowing what ingredients make up a healthy salad dressing and the learning to mix those ingredients in a way that treats your personal food preference. Keep in mind you’ll probably... 
    Read More →
  • Deadly fire on Norman Atlantic may have been started in olive oil lorry

    The car ferry Norman Atlantic that caught fire in the Adriatic Sea killing eight people and injuring dozens more was found to have serious safety flaws during an inspection just 10 days ago.

    The Norman Atlantic was examined by the international maritime authority Paris MoU earlier this month and found to have faulty fire doors, too few life rafts and poor emergency lighting.

    The vessel, which was operated by Greek shipping company Anek Lines, was also criticized for its plans for how to handle passengers in the event of an emergency – raising serious questions over whether the tragedy could have been prevented.

    The news comes as Italian officials launch an investigation to establish whether the fire started in one of the many lorries transporting olive oil from Greece to Italy, or if the highly flammable cargo simply added fuel the flames and made the deadly blaze even more intense.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.8/10 (18 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +3 (from 15 votes)
    The car ferry Norman Atlantic that caught fire in the Adriatic Sea killing eight people and injuring dozens more was found to have serious safety flaws during an inspection just 10 days ago. The Norman Atlantic was examined by the international maritime authority Paris MoU earlier... 
    Read More →
  • Texans Discover Oil Grows on Olive Trees as Crude Drops

    As crude prices tumble, landowners across Texas are accelerating production of a different kind of oil — olive oil.

    “I love the trees, and I love watching them grow,” Steve Coffman Jr. said of his 40 acres (16 hectares) of budding olive trees, which he planted two years ago on his red dirt ranch just outside Cotulla, Texas, the epicenter of the state’s Eagle Ford shale-oil boom.

    Nowadays he doesn’t have the same affection for his oil wells, which sit just down the road from his olive trees.

    “I can’t look, it’s depressing,” Coffman said as he pulled out his smartphone to check the latest energy prices. He shook his head. West Texas Intermediate crude had fallen again.

    Five years after one of the biggest oil booms in decades boosted royalty checks, a steep decline in oil prices has Texans seeking new ways to stay ahead. About 70 farmers across the state — up from 24 in 2008 — are hoping to cash in on America’s growing appetite for olive oil, a small part of the latest effort to diversify the economy of the second most-populous U.S. state.

    In 2013 Texas farmers planted about 500,000 olive trees, up from 80,000 trees in 2008, according to figures from the Texas Olive Oil Council. The council expects around two million trees to be planted by the end of next year.

    “There are now lots of sectors in Texas that just were not here in the 80’s,” said Michael Plante, a senior research economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. San Antonio has a thriving health-care industry, while Austin has technology. “These are non-trivial portions of the Texas economy now.”

    Texas isn’t traditionally olive country, and two decades ago the state had virtually no olives to speak of. In the late 1990s a handful of farmers became intrigued by the prospect of growing olives in the state. As it turned out, the climate in parts of central and southern Texas was well suited to the Mediterranean specimen.

    The U.S. is among the world’s largest consumers of olive oil, yet it produces just a fraction of its own consumption. About 97 percent of the olive oil used in the U.S. is imported from overseas, primarily Italy and Spain, according to the American Olive Oil Producers Association.

    Net Importer

    Last year the U.S. imported $1.1 billion worth of olive oil, up from around $400 million in 2000, according to import figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    The olive arrived in California in the late 1700s in the hands of Franciscan monks who acquired it from Spanish missionaries. California remains the dominant producer of American olive oil, accounting for almost all of the nation’s domestic production. Last year the state produced approximately 3.5 million gallons, according to the association.

    Texas, which produces less than 15,000 gallons a year, is a mere drizzle.

    Texans know all too well that relying too heavily on the oil industry can lead to trouble. In the 1980s, the bottom fell out of the oil market, leading to a wave of bank failures and, eventually, a regional recession.

    Thomas Tunstall, research director at the Institute for Economic Development at the University of Texas at San Antonio, preaches economic diversification. He’s lived in Texas all his life and is familiar with the pattern of boom and bust that has plagued Texas.

    Sustainable Economies

    As the oil boom gathered steam over the past few years, he urged communities to build diverse, sustainable local economies.

    “I’m working with them to try to figure out how not to become the next ghost town,” Tunstall said.

    He is pushing everything from spinach to geothermal energy to wildlife photography. And olives.

    “Olive farming isn’t going to provide huge numbers of jobs,” Tunstall said. “But it offers some specialization.”

    On a recent day bobwhite quail flitted through the rows of young olive trees on Coffman’s ranch. For years the 32-year old rancher barely eked out a living here. He made money by selling deer hunts, raising cattle and flirting with day jobs. Then, about five years ago, landmen swooped in and brought surprising news: There was oil under that red dirt. Lots of it.

    “We suddenly came upon a rather large inflow of funds and it had to go somewhere,” he said, as he puffed on a Marlboro.

    Oil Dependent

    To be sure, olives aren’t a panacea.

    “You have to be very careful about thinking olives are the salvation to counties that are dependent on the oil industry,” said Jim Henry, one of the state’s first olive growers and founder of the Texas Olive Ranch, which markets 100% Pure Texas Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Henry sells various flavors of oil, such as a peppery “Rattlesnake” or a smoky “Mesquite.”

    Henry says that growing olives isn’t easy and that weather in Texas can be fickle. He believes the best regions to grow olives lie outside the Eagle Ford region and closer to the more temperate expanses near the Gulf of Mexico.

    Coffman isn’t daunted, and says he has nothing to lose, especially as oil prices continue their downward march. “Nobody knows what these Eagle Ford wells are going to do,” he said, noting that estimates put the life of his wells in the range of 15 to 50 years.

    Olive orchards, he says, can fruit for up to 25 years. And when they’re no longer productive they can be planted anew.

    “No one’s going to go out and plant an oil well,” he said. “It would be cool if you could.”

    Article source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.9/10 (33 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +1 (from 9 votes)
    As crude prices tumble, landowners across Texas are accelerating production of a different kind of oil — olive oil. “I love the trees, and I love watching them grow,” Steve Coffman Jr. said of his 40 acres (16 hectares) of budding olive trees, which he planted two years... 
    Read More →
  • Recipe: Greek Salad Bites with Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    I’m always looking for easy appetizers to throw together for an impromptu gathering. Inspired by these scrumptious caprese skewers, I decided it was time to test out a Greek salad skewer.

    All it takes is a bit of chopping of ingredients, and in about 20 minutes, I had a plate full of these delectable bites. The key is to make sure you have the right portion of each component – you don’t want to overdo it with the briny Feta and olives.

    A quick drizzle of olive oil and voilà, the easiest, freshest, and most flavorful app ever.

    Ingredients

    1/4 English cucumber
    Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    1/4 pound feta cheese, cut into 16 small cubes
    8 pitted kalamata olives, halved
    8 grape or cherry tomatoes, halved
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    Directions

    Cut four 1/2-inch-thick diagonal slices from the cucumber, and then quarter each slice. Season with 1/4 teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Top each with a piece of feta and then an olive half.

    Stab a toothpick through a tomato half, then thread through one of the cucumber stacks, pushing the toothpick down to secure it.

    Arrange on a platter, drizzle with the olive oil, sprinkle with some more black pepper, and serve.
    Information

    Category: Finger Foods, Appetizers

    Yield: Serves 4-6

    Recipe adapted from Fine Cooking source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.6/10 (69 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +6 (from 24 votes)
    I’m always looking for easy appetizers to throw together for an impromptu gathering. Inspired by these scrumptious caprese skewers, I decided it was time to test out a Greek salad skewer. All it takes is a bit of chopping of ingredients, and in about 20 minutes, I had... 
    Read More →
  • Olive Oil Expertise from a Pro

    It was in an olive grove in Tuscany that Maia Hirschbein had an epiphany that would determine her future. Already a food lover, she had come to Italy in 2012 to study its food, culture and language, and with no other particular direction, she answered an ad asking for help with the olive harvest.

    “I took a train, not knowing where I was going, and met some guy who gave me a room and put me to work,” she said. “I’d wake up early and spend the day raking unripe Tuscan olives off the trees.”

    The olives were then brought to the mill, a modern production facility, “and I was able to watch the steps of seeing my fruit milled and transformed before my eyes,” Hirschbein said. “In 30 to 40 minutes, it had turned this bright neon green that smelled incredible, and I thought, ‘How have I never tasted this before? It’s so full of life.’ ”

    Hirschbein now works as a contractor for California Olive Ranch, a Chico, California-based company whose rectangular-shaped bottles are widely sold. Her job includes advocating for using locally produced olive oil and teaching people how to taste it, what vocabulary to use, how to cook with it, and what to look for when buying it.

    “In every country of the world, using a fat of some kind is a way to increase the deliciousness of your food,” she said, “and olive oil tends to be my personal favorite.”

    Hirschbein believes that even though she grew up in a food-centric Jewish family, hers was no different than most: “I grew up on rancid and low-quality olive oil, which is so common here in the U.S.,” she said.

    Not anymore. Hirschbein now has her mother, Kathy Beitscher, baking her “legendary challah” with olive oil. Originally from La Mesa, California, a suburb of San Diego, Hirschbein, 31, now lives in Oakland. She grew up in a Conservative Jewish family, attending Jewish day school through sixth grade. Her paternal grandparents were Polish Holocaust survivors and her grandmother made all the Jewish classics.

    Hirschbein says as a child she wouldn’t eat her grandmother’s chopped liver, but now chopped liver is one of her favorite foods.

    She fondly recalls large Shabbat dinners with her grandparents, and her parents growing a lot of produce in their backyard. Cooking meals and cleaning up the kitchen were major ways her family spent time together.

    Now that she is an oleologist (olive oil expert), Hirschbein appreciates how olive oil is a “vein that goes through all my interests, from food to Judaism.”

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.1/10 (22 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +8 (from 14 votes)
    It was in an olive grove in Tuscany that Maia Hirschbein had an epiphany that would determine her future. Already a food lover, she had come to Italy in 2012 to study its food, culture and language, and with no other particular direction, she answered an ad asking for help with... 
    Read More →
  • Greek olive oil producers hoping to strike gold

    Greek olive oil producers are nursing high expectations this season as the exceptionally bad year in Italy resulting from the destruction of crops by bad weather and the olive fruit fly, as well as the very low output in Spain, have opened the way for Greek produce.

    Greece’s Agricultural Development Ministry estimates that local olive oil production this year will soar to 300,000 tons, against just 135,000 tons last year.

    Due to the low output in other European countries, the ministry is anticipating a rise in prices for producers that could reach up to 3.40 euros per liter.

    Nevertheless, market professionals are urging caution among olive oil producers who have decided to wait, stressing that the rumors regarding the signing of expensive contracts may well turn out to be no more than mere rumors.

    “If everyone waits to sell at a high price, then they will eventually fall,” said Manolis Vakontios, the president of the Sitia Agricultural Cooperatives Association on Crete.

    Article source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.9/10 (30 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -1 (from 13 votes)
    Greek olive oil producers are nursing high expectations this season as the exceptionally bad year in Italy resulting from the destruction of crops by bad weather and the olive fruit fly, as well as the very low output in Spain, have opened the way for Greek produce. Greece’s... 
    Read More →
  • Greek Olive Oil Company helping change the Way America Eats

    EVGE, a Greek olive oil company specializing in extra virgin olive oil, olives, and olive paste, has announced the launch of their products in the United States.

    EVGE’s Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil are produced from Koroneiki olives from the famed Peloponnese region of Greece. The olives are hand harvested and then cold pressed immediately in order to ensure that their nutritional attributes are maintained in addition to having low acidity, balanced taste, rich texture and a vibrant aroma.

    In discussing the company’s long-term plans for the American market, CEO and Managing Director Mr. John Papageorgiou said, “America has begun to embrace the Mediterranean-Greek diet. We at EVGE couldn’t be happier to supply the very staple of this healthy diet; premium quality olive oil. Healthy cooking and eating begins with olive oil and EVGE produces some of the finest in the world. We offer premium quality at affordable prices. Our company’s name translated from Greek is ‘exceptionally done’, and for us, it’s not just a name but our inspiration.”

    Building on their momentum, EVGE has already had considerable distinctions come their way.

    EVGE Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil is, in fact, certifiable as organic thanks to the company’s cultivation and processing techniques. However, the company opted to produce a supreme quality Organic EVOO exceeding the standards recommended by the International Olive Oil Council along with organic certification bodies in both Europe and the United States.

    Executive Chef Jeffery Lizotte displayed his culinary mastery exclusively using EVGE Organic EVOO at the Tri-State Food Expo this past September creating stunning dishes much to the praise of participants.

    EVGE Olive Paste was recently recognized and awarded at the Great Taste Awards 2014 Competition.

    EVGE’s products are Kosher certified, a rare distinction for Greek olive oil.

    About EVGE Hellenic Food Company: EVGE is based in Athens-Greece and works exclusively with selects Greek farmers. The company plans to expand its operations as currently olive oil production reaches between 1-1.2 million bottles annually barely meeting demand. EVGE products are imported and distributed in the United States by Grecian Organics based in North Brunswick New Jersey.

    EVGE’s website

    Article source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.6/10 (29 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +4 (from 8 votes)
    EVGE, a Greek olive oil company specializing in extra virgin olive oil, olives, and olive paste, has announced the launch of their products in the United States. EVGE’s Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil are produced from Koroneiki olives from... 
    Read More →
  • Delicious recipe for December 26th by chef Mikael Forselius

    If the thought of a turkey re-run is enough to drive you round the bend, why not try these Norwegian recipes for a post-Christmas change?

    Cod brandade with chive oil

    serves 4

    Allow three days to make this.

    Ingredients

    400g fresh cod fillets
    20g salt
    1 bay leaf
    5g lemon thyme
    4 onion, minced
    2 cloves of garlic, minced
    100ml milk
    100g potatoes
    40ml extra virgin olive oil

    for the chive oil
    4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
    1 tbsp chives, chopped

    Directions

    Salt the cod very generously. Place in a pan and cover with water. Put it in the refrigerator for two days, changing the water three or four times. Drain and rinse the cod.

    In a pan, add the herbs, onion and garlic to the milk and heat for five minutes. Do not let it boil. Add the cod and poach until tender (five to seven minutes).

    Gently remove the cod with a slotted spoon. Remove any bones and skin, and break the flesh into coarse chunks.

    Meanwhile peel and dice the potatoes. Cook in well-seasoned water or, better still, use the milk the fish was poached in. When the potatoes are tender, drain (reserving a couple of tablespoons of the cooking liquid) and purée, in either a ricer or a mixer using the paddle attachment.

    Take out one third of the potatoes and mix in the cod (at a medium speed, if using a mixer), drizzling in the olive oil and a bit of the cooking liquid. Add the rest of the potatoes gradually and keep mixing and adding liquid until it is the consistency you like.

    To make the chive oil, mix together the olive oil and chopped chives, season with salt and pepper. Pound with a pestle and mortar.

    To serve, shape the cod into an egg shape using two spoons and place on thin crackers. Serve the chive oil on the side.

    Recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.9/10 (60 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +6 (from 24 votes)
    If the thought of a turkey re-run is enough to drive you round the bend, why not try these Norwegian recipes for a post-Christmas change? Cod brandade with chive oil serves 4 Allow three days to make this. Ingredients 400g fresh cod fillets 20g salt 1 bay leaf 5g lemon thyme 4... 
    Read More →
  • Have the perfect Christmas with a delicious turkey recipe inspired by Jamie Oliver

    Christmas, a time for family, rest and relaxation for all… wrong! Not if you are the one in charge of the most important task of the day, the main event that everyone comes to your house for – no, not trying to keep grandma away from the sherry but cooking the Christmas turkey.

    With the right planning and my step-by-step guide, you can take the stress away and enjoy the most delicious Christmas turkey you have ever had. Your guests will want you to host Christmas every year (but do not let them make you).

    Turkey often gets branded as dry and that is because the legs will take longer to cook than the breast. The best solution is to use the stuffing between the meat and the skin of the turkey. This makes the breasts thicker so the bird cooks evenly, giving you a juicy, well-cooked turkey.

    Ingredients

    1tbsp olive oil
    A handful of sage leaves
    12 slices of Pancetta or streaky bacon
    6 garlic cloves
    2 onions
    2 sticks of celery, finely chopped
    2 handfuls of breadcrumbs
    1 handful of dried apricots, roughly chopped
    300g minced pork
    Zest of 1 lemon
    A pinch of nutmeg
    1 large egg
    Salt and pepper
    1 turkey
    12 small sprigs of rosemary
    2 carrots
    1 large orange
    2tbsp plain flour
    1l chicken stock

    Method

    Step 1: Preheat the oven to the maximum setting.

    Step 2: Make a start on the stuffing. In a saucepan on a medium heat, add the olive oil. Then add the sage leaves, half of the pancetta, two peeled and chopped garlic cloves, a finely chopped onion and the celery, and soften until brown.

    Step 3: Take the saucepan off the heat and add the breadcrumbs and apricots, and leave to cool.

    Step 4: Next, add your pork mince, lemon zest, nutmeg and egg to the saucepan. Season with salt and pepper before mixing well.

    Step 5: Now make a start on the turkey. Give it a wipe on the inside and outside with kitchen paper (never wash it in the sink as this spreads bacteria around it and on kitchen surfaces).

    Step 6: Take the remaining garlic and peel and cut into thin shards. Take the rest of the pancetta and halve the slices lengthways and then cut into 5cm-long rectangles. Take a small sprig of rosemary and roll the garlic and rosemary tightly (a bit like wrapping sausages in bacon). Repeat until there are 12 little parcels. Create six holes in the thighs of each leg and push the little wraps into the slits. This will add wonderful flavour to the meat.

    Step 7: Cut the second onion into chunks and roughly chop the carrots.

    Step 8: With the neck of the turkey facing you, find the edge of the skin that covers the breast, put your fingers in and start to separate the skin from the breast very gently, without breaking the skin. Then take the stuffing and push it in between the skin and the breast. Then use the excess skin and flap it underneath the turkey (or use a small skewer to hold it in place) to prevent anything spilling out.

    Step 9: Heat the orange in the microwave for 30 seconds to release the oils and push it into the turkey’s cavity. Then place the bird in a large roasting tin and surround it with the onions, carrots and the rest of the garlic.

    Step 10: Cover the bird in foil and turn the oven down to 180 degrees Celsius/gas mark 4 and roast for the correct time (check the packaging for recommended times or ask your butcher if you are not sure -remember to add on a little bit of time to take account of the stuffing) until the juices run clear. For the last 30 minutes, take off the foil and let the skin brown. And pour the juices from the meat into a saucepan; this will be used for the gravy.

    Step 11: Once the turkey is cooked, remove it from the oven and place it on a serving tray. Loosely cover it with foil or a clean towel and leave to rest 20 minutes.

    Step 12: Finally the gravy. Add some flour to a new saucepan and cook for a minute (this is important to avoid a floury taste), then add the juices from the turkey and the chicken stock. Keep stirring the gravy until it thickens.

    There you go, turkey and gravy that will have you wanting seconds and thirds.

    Recipe by Jihan-Annesa Turner, source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.0/10 (50 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +7 (from 13 votes)
    Christmas, a time for family, rest and relaxation for all… wrong! Not if you are the one in charge of the most important task of the day, the main event that everyone comes to your house for – no, not trying to keep grandma away from the sherry but cooking the Christmas... 
    Read More →
  • Recipe: Vegetarian Cauliflower Cake with Olive Oil

    I have made this spectacular vegetarian dish from Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi at least six times in the past month, comments Bonnie Stern – the author of twelve best-selling cookbooks.

    That’s a favourite recipe! Sometimes I roast the cauliflower, sometimes I use a mixture of smoked and aged cheddar and sometimes I use different herbs but it all starts with this recipe.

    INGREDIENTS

    -1 small cauliflower (about 2 lbs), trimmed and broken into 1 1/2-inch florets (about 4 cups)
    -1 medium red onion
    -1/3 cup olive oil
    -1/2 tsp finely chopped rosemary
    -7 eggs
    -1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
    -2/3 cup all-purpose flour
    -1 tsp baking powder
    -1/3 tsp turmeric
    -1 1/2 cups coarsely grated
    -Parmesan or other aged cheese
    -melted butter for brushing pan
    -1 tbsp white sesame seeds
    -1 tsp nigella seeds
    -kosher salt
    -freshly ground black pepper

    DIRECTIONS

    1. Place cauliflower and 1 tsp salt in a saucepan and cover with water. Simmer 15 minutes until florets are tender and break apart with pressed. Drain well and pat dry.

    2. Cut four round thin slices off one end of the red onion. Break it apart into rounds. Select about 16 rounds of different sizes to decorate the top. Chop remaining onion and extra slices. Cook onions in oil with rosemary until tender. Transfer to a large bowl and cool. Beat in eggs and basil. Whisk flour with baking powder, turmeric and 1 1/2 tsp salt and beat into eggs. Add cheese and 1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper. Fold in cauliflower.

    3. Line bottom and sides of 9-inch spring form pan with parchment paper (butter sides of pan lightly to hold parchment in place). Butter sides of parchment paper and sprinkle with sesame and nigella seeds. Pour in cauliflower mixture and smooth evenly. Arrange onion rings on top. Place on a baking sheet (in case pan leaks) and bake in a preheated 350F for 40 to 45 minutes or until a knife inserted into the centre comes out clean and top is golden. Cool at least 20 minutes before serving.

    Makes 8 to 10 servings

    Recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.9/10 (94 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +5 (from 29 votes)
    I have made this spectacular vegetarian dish from Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi at least six times in the past month, comments Bonnie Stern – the author of twelve best-selling cookbooks. That’s a favourite recipe! Sometimes I roast the cauliflower, sometimes I use... 
    Read More →
  • OliveOilMarket: Merry Christmas & Happy New Year 2015!

    May all our clients, followers, partners and friends have a happy and peaceful Holiday season, and a great 2015!

    This year will be a challenging year for all those involved with olive oil. OliveOilMarket will continue to promote excellence, mutual respect and understanding worldwide – and especially convince consumers that it is well worth paying the higher price expected for extra virgin olive oil.

    For centuries men have kept an appointment with Christmas. Christmas means fellowship, feasting, giving and receiving, a time of good cheer, home…

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 6.1/10 (28 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +15 (from 21 votes)
    May all our clients, followers, partners and friends have a happy and peaceful Holiday season, and a great 2015! This year will be a challenging year for all those involved with olive oil. OliveOilMarket will continue to promote excellence, mutual respect and understanding... 
    Read More →
  • What You Need To Know about Olive Nutritional Facts

    Olives are fruits of the tree known as Olea europaea. ‘Olea’ is the Latin word for ‘oil,’ reflecting the olives very high fat content, of which 75% is oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat that has been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels. ‘Europaea’ reminds us that olives are native to the Mediterranean region of Europe.

    Olive is a drupe or stone-fruit with a central single seed, surrounded by edible pulp. Their size and shape greatly varies depending on the cultivar type.

    On an average, a fruit weighs about 3-5 g. Raw fruits are green, which turn yellow to dark as it ripens further. Its fruits are generally picked at stages, whether they destined to be used as table fruits or pressed for oil.

    Traditionally, olives have been viewed as very healthy food. The fruit provides calories; contain significant amounts of plant-derived anti-oxidants, minerals, phyto-sterols, and vitamins.

    Olives are a moderate source of calories; 100 g of fruits provide just 115 calories. Their calorie content basically comes from fats. Nonetheless, the fruit composes healthy fat in the form of mono-unsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) like oleic acid (18:1) and palmitoleic acid (16:1) that help lower LDL or “bad cholesterol” and increase HDL or “good cholesterol” in the blood. Research studies suggest that Mediterranean diet, which is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids help to prevent coronary artery disease and strokes by favoring healthy blood lipid profile.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.8/10 (27 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +3 (from 13 votes)
    Olives are fruits of the tree known as Olea europaea. ‘Olea’ is the Latin word for ‘oil,’ reflecting the olives very high fat content, of which 75% is oleic acid, a monounsaturated fat that has been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels. ‘Europaea’... 
    Read More →
  • 12th Global Olive Oil Competition 2015 in Beijing

    Under the promotion of China’s huge market potential and economic globalization, more and more foreign olive oil manufacturers enter China. Olive Oil has been recognized by more and more consumers in China. The purpose of this event is order to better promote the standardized development of olive oil industry, carry out the national famous brand development strategy, set up the China International healthy olive oil brand, and promote the flourished development of healthy industry.

    The purpose of this event is to display the best Olive Oil and Olive Oil Brands; to increase the transparency of olive oil consumption market in China; to improve the popularity of olive oil company and brand, expand product distribution channels; to display the best olive oil to the consumers, suppliers and retailers; o increase the attention of society to olive oil industry, promote the healthy and standardized development; and to give the affirmation and commendation to healthy and high-quality olive oil products and brands.

    At the first stage, the participating olive oil will be tasted and evaluated by the jury an d the result will serve producers, exporters, importers, wholesalers, dealers and agents as scientific basis for the long-term quality improvement of “Extra Virgin Olive Oil” and choice of the best olive oil. Finally, at the second stage, the same oil will be tasted and ranked after popularity by consumers that will visit Global Olive Oil Competition 2015.

    The followings are allowed to participate in “2015 Global Olive Oil Competition”: Producers, exporters, importers, wholesalers, and agents of olive oil. Only Companies producing or selling the minimum quantity of no. 3,000 bottles with capacity of 0.75 liter or equivalent production will be admitted.

    Only “Extra Virgin Olive Oils” in original bottles are certified for participation. The submitted olive oils must correspond to the Chinese legislation or the related standards of IOOC as well as the regulations valid in the production countries.

    The participating olive oil is divided into two categories: extra virgin olive oil and organic olive oil, and divided into 3 ranks according to the sensory evaluation: license,medium and light.

    Each participant must send the following by courier and/or post by March 15th ,2015 to:

    Beijing Shibowei International Exhibition Co., Ltd.,
    Room 904, Cell 4, Building 1, No 69(Fortune street tower), Chao Yang Road, Chao Yang District, Beijing, China
    100123
    Tel: +86 10 85785006 ext 621
    Fax: +86 10 51413308

    Article source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.1/10 (22 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +2 (from 10 votes)
    Under the promotion of China’s huge market potential and economic globalization, more and more foreign olive oil manufacturers enter China. Olive Oil has been recognized by more and more consumers in China. The purpose of this event is order to better promote the standardized... 
    Read More →
  • The International Study On Olive Oil Production Costs

    Commissioned and supervised by the management of the International Olive Council and coordinated by Maria Isabel Gómez from the IOC Statistics Department, this international study has been led by two experts with a solid track record in the subject area, José María Penco and Juan Vilar, who have drafted the study and its conclusions.

    The first is an agronomist and project manager with the Spanish Association of Olive Growing Municipalities (AEMO) while the second has a PhD in Economics and is a lecturer at the University of Jaen in Spain, although currently on leave of absence. Both were chosen as study leaders by the experts from IOC member countries sitting on the IOC Working Group briefed to carry out the study.

    A summary follows of the working approach and methodology applied and the preliminary results and recommendations.

    Introduction and Methodology
    The world olive oil sector generates a turnover between 6 500 and 11 000 million euros per crop year and provides a livelihood for more 30 million people in 7 million households. Olives are grown on 11 million hectares of land in 47 producer countries dotted across the five continents.

    At present, olive oil is consumed in more than 160 countries.

    According to the data for the 2012 crop year, 3.1 million tonnes of olive oil are produced and consumed compared with 184 million tonnes of all edible oils and fats, of which 24 million are of animal origin. Put differently, olive oil accounts for 1.7 pc of all edible vegetable and animal fats.

    These figures show that world olive oil production is a strategic economic sector and an influential player in the international arena. It is also a sector where production and consumption have their own idiosyncratic characteristics.

    The objective of the five-part study has been to ascertain the cost of producing one kilogram of virgin olive oil, expressed in euros, in different olive cultivation systems. The first part deals with the methodology and covers the analysis of the different cultivation systems proposed, the preparation of the survey questionnaires, the analysis of the results and other aspects. A description is then given of olive oil production in the participant countries in the study on the basis of a series of figures permitting a comprehensive sectoral diagnosis.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.6/10 (17 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +5 (from 9 votes)
    Commissioned and supervised by the management of the International Olive Council and coordinated by Maria Isabel Gómez from the IOC Statistics Department, this international study has been led by two experts with a solid track record in the subject area, José María Penco and... 
    Read More →
  • Hanukkah 2014 - The Jewish Festival of Lights Signifies Hope, Peace and Olive Oil

    Hanukkah is an eight-day Jewish holiday, which roughly coincides with Christmas, commemorating the rededication of the Holy Jewish Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BCE.

    During the Hanukkah festival, which is celebrated for seven nights and starts on the 25th of the month of Kislev, the Jewish month that coincides with November or December in the Gregorian calendar, Jewish people around the world light a candelabra (Menorah) according to each day of Hanukkah. For example, on the first night, one candle is light, on the second night, two candles, and so forth.

    In Judaism, Hanukkah is considered also to be a festival of miracles, following the story of the small group of proud Jews called the Maccabees (Macabim in Hebrew) which fought the larger Greek army that occupied The Holy Land at the time.

    According to tradition, after the second temple was plundered by the invading armies, one small container of olive oil was left unspoiled in the temple, with all the others being spoiled or pillaged by the invaders. When used to light the Menorah (candelabra), the lone container, which was only supposed to last for one day, kept the flames miraculously glowing for eight full days.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.5/10 (28 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +3 (from 13 votes)
    Hanukkah is an eight-day Jewish holiday, which roughly coincides with Christmas, commemorating the rededication of the Holy Jewish Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BCE. During the Hanukkah festival, which is... 
    Read More →
  • Healthy holiday eating Q&A with an Emory Healthcare cardiologist

    With holiday parties in full swing, many people are staying busy and eating on the go or overindulging in sweet party treats. Gina Lundberg, MD, the clinical director of Emory Women’s Heart Center and assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine answers questions from the general public on how to make smart food and drink decisions during the holidays.

    Are certain oils more “heart healthy” than others? Like olive vs. coconut?

    The healthiest oils are olive and canola oil. Coconut has more saturated fat and isn’t as healthy. Olive and canola oils work best for veggies, but may not be as good for baking. When baking, I would use spray oil like coconut or peanut oil, which taste better in baked dishes.

    One of the problems with people knowing olive oil is healthy is that people tend to consume too much. The Mediterranean Diet suggests 4 tablespoons of olive oil per person per day max.

    What are some entrée or side substitutions I can make without losing the “holiday” touch?

    Turkey and ham are both lean meat, so entrees aren’t usually the problem. The side dishes are usually where we run into trouble. Feel free to have your ham, turkey, and even lean pork and beef, but try to avoid the potato-heavy, cheesy side dishes.

    Try to go heavier on green veggies instead. Veggies like broccoli and cauliflower make you feel full. Sweet potatoes are also great but try to avoid adding the marshmallows and extra sugar.

    I tend to eat a healthy plant based diet about 90 percent of the time so on the holidays I basically eat what I like. Is this strategy okay for someone like me? I do aerobic and strength training exercises about 120 minutes four times a week.

    We ask most women to do 150-180 minutes of cardio exercise per week, so you’re doing great there! My concern regarding your diet would be that if you don’t normally eat fatty foods, you might find yourself with an upset stomach that could disrupt your holidays! I would still try to make healthy choices and not go overboard. All things in moderation–a few bites of cheesecake won’t ruin your healthy diet. Also, as you get older and your metabolism slows, it’s going to get harder to recover from splurges like this.

    I try to drink 64 oz. of water a day (although it’s a struggle to reach that through the holidays). Is that sufficient?

    Yes, for most people, 64 ounces is plenty! If you exercise a lot or sweat excessively, you may need to drink a little more. On the other hand, if you have kidney failure or congestive heart failure, you may need to drink less (just consult your physician). Also, alcohol can be dehydrating, so if your holiday celebrations involve alcohol, you may want to drink more to remain hydrated.

    I crave sweets every day. What can I do to satisfy my cravings without reaching for the chocolate?

    The more sugar you eat, the more you crave sugar. If you stick to a diet that is higher in protein, you’ll be more satisfied and won’t crave sugar as much. Eating healthier snacks more frequently (fruit, veggies, raw nuts) will stop you from being hungry and eating the wrong things.

    You may have heard that dark chocolate is healthy for you. All you need for the benefit of dark chocolate is about the size of one Hershey’s Kiss, so if you’d like to reward yourself with a few M&M’s or the fun-size versions of candy bars instead of large ones, do that and limit yourself to one per day. Also, try things with natural sugar. Fruits like pineapple and peaches are very high in sugar, and dried fruit can also be very sweet.

    I’ve heard that most of the sodium we consume doesn’t actually come from salt. Is that true and how much sodium should I have each day?

    Sodium from salt shakers makes up only about 15 percent of our daily sodium intake. The other 85 percent is in the processed foods in our diet. Anything that comes in a box, a bag or a can is high in sodium for the preservative effect, and most restaurant food and all fast food is very high in sodium.

    Be aware of foods that are low in fat or sugar, because they often add extra salt to achieve flavor. The low sodium diet we recommend is called the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension). Cook more of your fresh produce at home and use other seasonings to give your food flavor like lemon, pepper, garlic, cumin, tumeric, oregano, parsley etc.

    What’s the benefit of nuts? I’ve always read they are a healthy snack, but they are so high in fat.

    The main benefits of nuts are Omega-3 fatty acids and the high level of protein they provide. The healthiest nuts are walnuts and almonds, followed by pecans and pistachios. Peanuts have the most fat. Here’s the problem with snacking on nuts: The appropriate serving size is about 10 almonds, so they are easy to overeat. Be sure to limit yourself to just a handful. Adding almond slices to salads and veggies is a great way to add nuts into your diet.

    Dr. Oz recently said that brown rice is high in arsenic and that white rice is actually better for you. I love brown rice, but should I switch to using white rice?

    There is years of evidence that support the fact that brown rice is much healthier than white rice. There’s not enough research about arsenic in rice for us to say for certain. Bottom line: Brown is healthier for you, but if you’re concerned, dump the rice and eat quinoa instead!

    Article source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.9/10 (38 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +3 (from 15 votes)
    With holiday parties in full swing, many people are staying busy and eating on the go or overindulging in sweet party treats. Gina Lundberg, MD, the clinical director of Emory Women’s Heart Center and assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine answers... 
    Read More →
  • Recipe: Double Chocolate Olive Oil Cake

    Ingredients:

    1 ¾ cups all purpose flour
    2 cups sugar
    ¾ cups cocoa powder
    1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
    1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
    1 teaspoon salt
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    ½ cup extra virgin olive oil (or Queen Creek Chocolate Olive Oil)
    1 cup whole milk
    1 cup boiling water

    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a deep 9 or 10 inch round cake pan.
    In a large mixing bowl, blend together flour, sugar, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Mix in eggs, vanilla and olive oil. Add milk and beat on medium speed until well blended. Add boiling water and continue to beat at low speed. The mixture will be thin and runny.
    Pour into prepared cake pan and bake for about 40 minutes or until toothpick comes up clean. Note: For layered cake, bake in two 9 inch rounds, and when cool, layer each with chocolate frosting.

    Chocolate Frosting:

    1 ½ cups butter, room temperature
    3 cups powdered sugar
    2 cups cocoa powder
    6 tablespoons hot espresso or coffee, or 2 teaspoons instant espresso
    6 tablespoons milk
    2 teaspoons vanilla

    Directions:

    With an electric mixer (or food processor) beat together butter, powdered sugar and cocoa. Add hot coffee, milk and vanilla, blending to mix until smooth and creamy. If too thin, add more powdered sugar.

    recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.3/10 (54 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -1 (from 17 votes)
    Ingredients: 1 ¾ cups all purpose flour 2 cups sugar ¾ cups cocoa powder 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder 1 ½ teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 2 eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla ½ cup extra virgin olive oil (or Queen Creek Chocolate Olive Oil) 1 cup whole milk 1 cup boiling water Directions: Preheat... 
    Read More →