Daily Archives: June 1, 2014

  • Recipe: Roasted Whole Fish with EVOO and How to Bone it Out

    I love roasting fish, but to grill fish, rub with olive oil and salt and cook on a hot grill 4 to 5 minutes per side depending on thickness of the fish, comments Bonnie Stern – the author of twelve best-selling cookbooks including the IACP award winning Essentials of Home Cooking.

    A 1 1/2 lb fish will serve one to two people.

    INGREDIENTS:
    – Two 1 1/2 lb (approx) whole fish, (e.g. branzino — sometimes called European sea bass), cleaned with head and tail on
    – 2 tsp kosher salt
    – 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
    – 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil and preferably evo3 olive oil brand
    – 1 lemon sliced
    – 6 sprigs rosemary
    – extra lemon slices and herbs for garnish
    lemon herb vinaigrette:
    – 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
    – 1/2 tsp kosher salt or to taste
    – 1 small clove garlic, minced
    – 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil and preferably evo3 olive oil brand
    – 1 tbsp chopped fresh rosemary, chives, parsley or tarragon

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    Rating: 5.5/10 (54 votes cast)
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    I love roasting fish, but to grill fish, rub with olive oil and salt and cook on a hot grill 4 to 5 minutes per side depending on thickness of the fish, comments Bonnie Stern – the author of twelve best-selling cookbooks including the IACP award winning Essentials of Home... 
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  • Sales of UC Davis student farm's olive oil products have brought $127,766

    UC Davis students and alumni who want to show their school pride can do more than wear a school T-shirt. They can eat UC Davis tomatoes, munch UC Davis bacon and dip their bread in UC Davis olive oil. For a while, they could even drink Aggie Lager.

    Starting with olive oil in 2008, UC Davis has added to its line of retail products, sold under the marketing moniker “campus grown.” The items are mostly food-based, in keeping with the university’s focus on agricultural science. The goal is to boost recognition for the school’s programs and bring in a little money at the same time.

    UC Davis is not the only campus that sells items it grows. California State University campuses in Fresno and Chico also sell produce, as do the two Cal Poly campuses.

    Many of the UC Davis items are sold at the campus bookstore as well as the university’s retail store in downtown Davis. Besides olive oil, offerings include body-care products, cutting boards made from UC Davis trees, honey and sun-dried tomatoes.

    While some products, such as meat from the school’s meat lab, have been sold for decades, olive oil was the first UC Davis-branded item to hit retail store shelves. The idea came from Sal Genito, who in the mid-2000s was UC Davis director of campus buildings and grounds. Genito wanted to do something about all of the fallen olives on streets and paths on campus, which created a slippery hazard for pedestrians and bicyclists. So he talked to a local bottler and processor, and then worked out a deal with UC Davis stores for sales of the oil.

    “This was really a sustainability thing where you had all of these olives on the ground getting wasted,” said Tom Hinds, head of marketing for the university. “So rather than send them off to a landfill, they were collected and turned into olive oil.”

    The success with olive oil raised enthusiasm among campus administrators to branch out into other offerings, Hinds said.

    Today there are four varieties of olive oil sold under the UC Davis label. Its “Estate” label olive oil sells for $15 per 8-ounce bottle. A majority of the oil is made from the first organic orchards on campus, planted in 2008.

    The other varieties come from a mix of olives grown on campus and those donated by olive growers in the Central Valley, as the center does not yet grow enough olives on its grounds to keep store shelves stocked, said Dan Flynn, executive director of the UC Davis Olive Center, which conducts research and education to serve California’s olive industry.

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    Rating: 5.5/10 (33 votes cast)
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    UC Davis students and alumni who want to show their school pride can do more than wear a school T-shirt. They can eat UC Davis tomatoes, munch UC Davis bacon and dip their bread in UC Davis olive oil. For a while, they could even drink Aggie Lager. Starting with olive oil in... 
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  • Ah, Greece, Islands, Beaches, The Mediterranean Diet and People who live to 101

    We should eat like the Greeks, of course. But finding a Greek market in Sacramento is like embarking on a true Odyssey.

    Unlike San Francisco, where a huge Greek population supports plenty of neighborhood Greek markets, Sacramento’s equally significant Greek community doesn’t have such finds.

    But if you’ve ever reached for the smallish, shiny and wrinkly black kalamata olives at an olive bar, eaten them on pizza or encountered them in olive bread, chances are those olives came from Mani Imports headquartered in West Sacramento.

    Founded in the late 1990s by Peter Cononelos, 52, Mani Imports began as a company so small its warehouse was a friend’s cabinet shop.

    Back then, even with a degree in economics from the University of California, Davis, Cononelos was as green at the food business as some of the olives he now sells.

    Having spent long periods of his childhood in the kalamata area of Greece, Cononelos speaks fluent Greek. He wanted to develop a line of food products to show the best of his culture. After all, he says, “being Greek is a blast.”

    He made the requisite trip to Corti Brothers in Sacramento to see if Darrell Corti would carry an extra-virgin olive oil made from koroneiki olives from Mani, a region southeast of kalamata. “I took a 250-ml (about 8 ounces) bottle in a brown bag and I went to Corti and asked ‘What would you pay for this?’ ” Cononelos recalls.

    “He gave me a number,” Cononelos said, his face showing satisfaction, “and I said, ‘I’m doing this.’ ”
    He describes Mani extra-virgin olive oil as having medium intensity and a green-grassy flavor profile from an area renown for oils made from the koroneiki olive. “Greece is really just one big olive orchard.”

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    Rating: 5.1/10 (30 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +1 (from 5 votes)
    We should eat like the Greeks, of course. But finding a Greek market in Sacramento is like embarking on a true Odyssey. Unlike San Francisco, where a huge Greek population supports plenty of neighborhood Greek markets, Sacramento’s equally significant Greek community doesn’t... 
    Read More →