Daily Archives: May 4, 2014

  • Bouillabaisse with Olive Oil - Bill Granger recipe

    Take all the separate elements of the dish to the table together for people to help themselves. I like to put a crouton at the base of my bowl then add a little bit of everything before pouring over a ladleful of broth. Yum.

    Serves 6-8

    Ingrediends:

    1 tbsp olive oil
    1 onion, chopped
    1 leek, chopped
    2 celery sticks, sliced
    1 fennel bulb, chopped, fronds reserved
    3 garlic cloves, sliced
    ½ tsp fennel seeds
    Large pinch chilli flakes
    Large pinch saffron strands
    2 wide strips orange peel
    4 large ripe tomatoes, chopped
    2 bay leaves
    1kg white-fish bones (ask your fishmonger for some clean carcases)
    1 large or 2 small snappers, gutted, gills removed and cut into chunks
    500g firm white-fish fillet, cut into chunks
    12 whole raw prawns
    500g mussels, cleaned
    300g clams, cleaned

    To serve

    Boiled potatoes
    1 large baguette, sliced and toasted
    Rouille
    Parsley
    Lemon wedges

    Preparation:

    Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy-based saucepan, add the onion, leek, celery, fennel and garlic. Fry for 5 minutes, or until slightly softened. Add the fennel seeds, chilli flakes, saffron, orange peel, tomatoes and bay leaves. Cook for a further minute.

    Add the fish bones then pour in 1.7 litres of cold water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove from the heat and strain into a large, clean pan, using a wooden spoon to push as much goodness through the sieve as you can.

    Return to the boil. Add the snapper and white fish and simmer gently for 3 minutes. Add the prawns, cook for another 2 minutes then tip in the mussels and clams and simmer for 2 minutes, or until opened.

    Using a slotted spoon, lift the cooked fish on to a platter. Taste the broth and adjust the seasoning with salt and chilli. Ladle a little broth over the fish to keep it moist.

    Serve the platter and broth with boiled potatoes, baguette croutons, rouille, parsley and lemon wedges.

    Recipe source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.7/10 (19 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +1 (from 5 votes)
    Take all the separate elements of the dish to the table together for people to help themselves. I like to put a crouton at the base of my bowl then add a little bit of everything before pouring over a ladleful of broth. Yum. Serves 6-8 Ingrediends: 1 tbsp olive oil 1 onion, chopped 1... 
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  • Cartels and organised crime target food in hunt for riches

    From adulterated olive oil to counterfeit vodka, the trade in fake food is booming – and for mafia gangs it’s less risky than drugs.

    At first glance the sprawling campus in the glorious Cotswolds countryside looks an unlikely base from which to wage war against Italy’s most feared crime organisation, the ‘Ndrangheta.

    And yet the laboratories of Campden BRI, once part of the University of Bristol and now a major research hub, are, in their own quiet way, playing a vital role in tackling organised crime. The laboratories are not conducting forensic tests on specks of blood or splinters of bone. Rather, they have been contracted by the government’s Rural Payments Agency to carry out chemical tests to establish the purity of olive oil which, since March, has been subject to new EU regulations designed to ensure that consumers get what they believe they are paying for.

    This is bad news for the ‘Ndrangheta and other organised criminal gangs, which for decades have been assiduously passing off inferior olive oil and oil from other vegetable sources as the premium extra virgin variety.

    According to the European parliament’s food safety committee, olive oil is the product most at risk of food fraud, and the rewards for adulteration of it are substantial. Cheap pomace olive oil – extracted from olive residue using chemicals – sells for 32.3p per 100ml, compared with £1.50 for extra virgin.

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.2/10 (9 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +1 (from 3 votes)
    From adulterated olive oil to counterfeit vodka, the trade in fake food is booming – and for mafia gangs it’s less risky than drugs. At first glance the sprawling campus in the glorious Cotswolds countryside looks an unlikely base from which to wage war against Italy’s... 
    Read More →
  • A New line of Olive Oil Cooking Sprays with ZERO Calories & Fat by Bertolli

    Want to drizzle some extra virgin olive oil on your salad? How about spraying it on?

    Bertolli Olive Oil has a new line of cooking oil sprays: Extra Virgin, Classico and Extra Light.

    The sprays have no additives — nor, it seems, calories, at least when spritzed for one-third of a second.

    According to the nutrition facts on the Bertolli Olive Oil Spray can, there are 350 one-third-of-a-second servings in each can, each containing zero calories and zero fat.

    The Extra Virgin spray is recommended for salads and pastas; the Classico, for sauces, pasta and roasting; the Extra Light, for sautéing, frying and baking.

    Bertolli® Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Rich, robust and distinguished by a deep green color, Bertolli® Extra Virgin Olive Oil is a special blend of select high-quality extra virgin olive oils “cold pressed” to ensure a naturally full-bodied fruity flavor. Just pour it on salads and pasta, add it to your marinades, hearty soups and sauces, or simply mix with cracked pepper and fresh herbs for a delectable dip.

    Smoke Point: 406° F†

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    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.8/10 (24 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +2 (from 6 votes)
    Want to drizzle some extra virgin olive oil on your salad? How about spraying it on? Bertolli Olive Oil has a new line of cooking oil sprays: Extra Virgin, Classico and Extra Light. The sprays have no additives — nor, it seems, calories, at least when spritzed for one-third... 
    Read More →