Daily Archives: December 2, 2013

  • NASFT Winter Fancy Food Show January 19 - 21, 2014

    Produced by the NASFT, the Fancy Food Shows are North America’s largest specialty food and beverage marketplace. New Products. New Trends. New Momentum. That’s what you need to Move Ahead in this economy.

    About the Fancy Food Shows
    Since 1955, the Fancy Food Shows have been North America’s largest specialty food and beverage marketplace. Between the Winter Show in San Francisco and the Summer Show in New York City, the Specialty Food Association events bring in more than 40,000 attendees from more than 80 countries and regions to see 260,000 innovative specialty food products, such as confections, cheese, coffee, snacks, spices, ethnic, natural, organic and more.

    Only Specialty Food Association Members can exhibit at the Shows, where retailers, restaurateurs, distributors and others discover innovative, new food and beverage products. The Shows are attended by every major food buying channel, influential members of the trade and consumer press and other related businesses.
    Read more specialtyfood

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.3/10 (14 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +1 (from 3 votes)
    Produced by the NASFT, the Fancy Food Shows are North America’s largest specialty food and beverage marketplace. New Products. New Trends. New Momentum. That’s what you need to Move Ahead in this economy. About the Fancy Food Shows Since 1955, the Fancy Food Shows... 
    Read More →
  • Nine out of 10 imported olive oils fail Australian standards

    Testing by the Australian Olive Association has found that up to nine out of 10 imported olive oil brands are failing Australian standards and are labelled incorrectly.

    During September 2011 and August 2013, the Association tested 106 imported oils from 40 brands and found that 77 percent of oils failed the Australian standard AS 5264-2011, with 93 percent of brands failing the standard for at least one product in their range. These findings are consistent findings published in Choice Magazine in 2010: that 80 percent of imported oils failed extra virgin standards.

    Before releasing the Australian Standard for Olive Oil (AS 5264-2011) in July 2011, Australia was one of the few countries that didn’t have a published standard for olive oil. Today, supporting the Standard is a voluntary Code of Practice, designed to support quality, authenticity and confidence in the Australian olive industry and its products. Producers subscribing to this code carry a triangle certification symbol on their products.

    Of all the mainstream edible oils, extra virgin olive oil is the only oil that has not been chemically or physically refined, and is 100 percent natural juice squeezed from fresh olive fruit, and represents 90 to 95 percent of olive oil produced in Australia.

    Other countries, however, don’t subscribe to the same standards. In October 2013 the European Union admitted that when it comes to food fraud, olive oil is the most affected product, with fraud including anything from substituting Greek olive oil for Italian olive oil, to adding refined olive oils or cheaper oils to the extra virgin olive oil.

    To help promote Australian oils, the Australian Olive Association (AOA) has launched a national campaign, headed up by nutritionist Dr Joanna McMillan, to educate consumers about the benefits of buying Australian olive oil, promoting Australian extra virgin olive oil as the fresher, healthier and tastier olive oil (see video below).

    CEO of the Australian Olive Association, Lisa Rowntree, said “We have been lobbying for two years for imported olive oils to comply with the Australian Standard and now the AOA has taken the only option available by directly educating the public with this campaign endorsed by Dr McMillan.

    “We encourage all conscientious consumers, cooks and chefs nationwide to swap to Australian olive oils. If they haven’t already; make the pledge today.”

    The Buy Australian Olive Oil campaign commenced on 1 December on television and radio.

    source

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 5.5/10 (2 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +1 (from 1 vote)
    Testing by the Australian Olive Association has found that up to nine out of 10 imported olive oil brands are failing Australian standards and are labelled incorrectly. During September 2011 and August 2013, the Association tested 106 imported oils from 40 brands and found that... 
    Read More →
  • How to solve deodorization frauds in extra virgin olive oil? The EU reply will be soon

    Good news for the scientific research, in Europe, to counteract the fraudulent activities in the world of the extra virgin olive oil. A workshop in Madrid has outlined the challenges and the urgent needs

    In April 2011, the EU Regulation n. 61/2011 (1) become operative and the content of fatty acids alkyl esters (FAAE) has become an official quality parameter for extra virgin olive oil. The methyl and ethyl alcohols, which are part of these esters, are formed as a result of enzymatic and fermentative processes which occur if the olives, before crushing, overripe or incorrectly stored, suffer damages to cellular structures. When this happens, in fact , the leakage of water can facilitate processes capable of generating many volatile substances, between those ethanol. It is no coincidence that the “vine-vinegary”, linked to the alcoholic, lactic and acetic fermentations, is one of the defects which downgrade the extra-virgin olive to virgin or lampante olive oil, depending on the intensity.

    A content over the limit of the alkyl esters can assume, however, the insiders know it, at least two different meanings.

    First case: downgrading of the category accompanied by other chemical or sensory non-conformities, precisely because the etiology of alkyl esters is linked to degradative or fermentative processes. In this case, it is frequent that the oil is also sensorial defected. The alkyl esters are here clearly markers of a lower quality of the product.

    Second case: the oil has values ​​of alkyl esters higher than limit, but the sensory quality is unexceptionable. These analytical results may produce the suspect that, to avoid a sensory downgrading, the oil has been subjected to a fraudulent “stripping” correction of the volatile compounds. The alkyl esters are, in this case, markers for a not allowed treatment, known as mild deodorization. This stripping can remove volatile compounds but does not seem able, and future research will confirm or disprove, to remove the alkyl esters.

    Currently the EU regulation sets a maximum limit on the total content of alkyl esters (sum of methyl and ethyl esters) of fatty acids at 75 mg kg-1, with the possibility to classify as “extra virgin olive oil” a product which, although presenting a total ester content of between 75 and 150 mg kg-1, has a value of the ratio ethyl/methyl esters less than or equal to 1.5. read more teatronaturale

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.6/10 (19 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +3 (from 9 votes)
    Good news for the scientific research, in Europe, to counteract the fraudulent activities in the world of the extra virgin olive oil. A workshop in Madrid has outlined the challenges and the urgent needs In April 2011, the EU Regulation n. 61/2011 (1) become operative and the... 
    Read More →
  • EU Commission has approved the transparency regulation on olive oil labels

    CMO Committee approves the modifications regarding the EU regulation n. 29/2012, concerning the commercialization and labeling norms of olive oils

    The EU Commission has finally approved the regulation on the transparency, on labels, for olive oils. This will enable to easily verify the characteristics and origin of the oil. In this way the consumers will be able to understand if the oil is Italian or not. It is an important result that saw Italy as one of the most active promoters of this norm. It is, in fact, necessary that label transparency becomes a fundamental principle for all foods, in order to protect consumers and guarantee honest competitiveness. As for the bottles to be used in restaurants, the Commission ensured that the State Members can set norms at the national level that ensure that bottles cannot be re-filled and that once opened they cannot be re-used.”

    This declared the Minister of agriculture food and forestry policies, Nunzia De Girolamo, commenting the approval by the CMO Committee with 283 votes in favor and 69 abstention, of the modifications regarding the EU regulation n. 29/2012, concerning the commercialization and labeling norms of olive oils. The new regulation will be applied from the 13 December 2014.
    Thanks to the approved modifications the information on the label should be reported in the same visual field and with same font, using the fonts stabilized by regulation n. 1169/2011.
    “The decision – the Minister continued – is an important step forward, even is the road to improve traceability is still a long one. For this reason, I have already manifested to the Commission the need to follow this direction in order to generate the modification of the norms awaited by the productive world.”

    teatronaturale

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.8/10 (21 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: -3 (from 9 votes)
    CMO Committee approves the modifications regarding the EU regulation n. 29/2012, concerning the commercialization and labeling norms of olive oils The EU Commission has finally approved the regulation on the transparency, on labels, for olive oils. This will enable to easily... 
    Read More →