Daily Archives: October 31, 2013

  • OLIVE Recipe: Mediterranean-style cracked olives

    Makes 10 pounds of olives

    • 10 pounds of green olives
    • 1 1/2 cups pickling or kosher salt (not iodized)
    • 2 cups white wine vinegar
    • Herbs, garlic, lemon, or other seasonings
    • Airtight, food grade plastic or glass containers

    Method:

    1. Sort the olives and discard any bruised or defective fruit. Rinse the olives in water and drain.

    2. Place olives one or two at a time on cutting board and strike it with a rubber mallet, rolling pin or stone. Crush each olive just to crack the flesh-do not break the pits or remove them.

    3. Place the olives into a food grade pale or glass jar and cover with fresh water. Keep olives submerged in the pale by using a plate or a plastic ziplock filled with water. Look for a jar that is easy to drain.

    4. Every 24 hours drain the olives and replace with fresh water. Do this for six or seven days until you no longer taste any bitterness. If you do taste some bitterness keep soaking until they are not bitter but not so long that they become bland.

    5. Prepare the finish brine — add 1 pound (about 1.5 cups) of salt to 1 gallon of cool water, stir to dissolve, and add 2 cups of white vinegar. This will be enough to treat 10 pounds of olives.

    6. Drain the debittered olives and cover with the finishing brine. At this point you can add herbs and other seasonings if desired. Consider some fresh oregano leaves, a clove of peeled, bruised garlic and a few thin slices of lemon. Close the lid tightly and keep refrigerated for 4 days or you can allow the flavors to develop more fully during longer storage.

    7. These olives can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 year in the finish brine. Drain and serve with a little dribble of olive oil.

    Recipe from Roger Wolfe, Dos Aguilas Olive Oil, Aptos

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 4.3/10 (16 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +2 (from 2 votes)
    Makes 10 pounds of olives10 pounds of green olives 1 1/2 cups pickling or kosher salt (not iodized) 2 cups white wine vinegar Herbs, garlic, lemon, or other seasonings Airtight, food grade plastic or glass containersMethod: 1. Sort the olives and discard any bruised or defective... 
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  • Will British Rapeseed Oil (Canola) Set To Replace Olive Oil In Consumer Shopping Baskets?

    Sales of British cold pressed rapeseed oil are set to soar as health conscious consumers look for a lower fat alternative to olive oil.

    In a recent independent survey of over 1100 UK consumers, 58 per cent of respondents said they would consider switching from olive to rapeseed oil when it was explained that it is less than half the saturated fat of olive oil and is produced in Britain.

    A further six per cent said that the higher burn point of the product (the stage when a cooking fat begins to smoke or burn) would be enough to encourage them to choose rapeseed oil over olive oil during their next supermarket shop.

    Ben Guy, managing director of Borderfields, the company that commissioned the independent survey and the leading producer of rapeseed oil in the UK, said:

    “The Mediterranean diet has traditionally been seen as healthier than the British diet due to its reliance on olive oil. That could all be about to change as British consumers are becoming more educated on the health, economic and environmental benefits of rapeseed oil.”

    “Not only is cold pressed rapeseed oil half the saturated fat of olive oil, but it also contains omegas 3, 6 and 9; essential fatty acids known to reduce cholesterol and maintain a healthy heart, brain function and joint mobility. It is also completely natural – free from additives and processing”

    Consumers all over the UK are voting with their shopping baskets. Volume demand for bottles of rapeseed oil has grown by 11.5 per cent across all sellers in the last year, according to retail analysts Kantar, while sales of extra virgin olive oil have fallen by 0.9%.

    Tesco, which stocks Borderfields, has seen sales of rapeseed oil increase by 60 per cent in the last year alone.

    Such is the demand that Borderfields is now successfully selling its cold pressed rapeseed oil infused with a variety of flavours plus a range of seasonal salad dressings.

    Ben Guy added: “We are starting to see a real tipping point in demand. It’s not difficult to appreciate the benefits of rapeseed over olive oil. It scores top marks for being healthy, local, environmentally friendly and tasty. I think that message is starting to get through to consumers.”

    There is a growing interest from celebrity chefs around the country who like its versatile nature. Michelin Star Chef Kenny Atkinson said: “Rapeseed oil can be used as a healthy butter and margarine replacement for baking as well as for dressings and dipping. It makes the best roast potatoes and excellent mayonnaise. I wouldn’t be without it in my kitchen.”

    comparison of dietary fats

    Canola oil used to be called RAPESEED oil but the name was changed for marketing reasons
    The term canola was coined from “Canadian oil, low acid” to convince consumers that this oil was safe to eat. And while “canola” was originally a registered trademark, the term became so widely known that the trademark was eventually abandoned, and “canola” became the default term in many countries for any low-erucic rapeseed oil.

    sources sys-con, naturalnews

     

    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: 3.7/10 (17 votes cast)
    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
    Rating: +3 (from 3 votes)
    Sales of British cold pressed rapeseed oil are set to soar as health conscious consumers look for a lower fat alternative to olive oil. In a recent independent survey of over 1100 UK consumers, 58 per cent of respondents said they would consider switching from olive to rapeseed... 
    Read More →