Monthly Archives: October 2013

  • OLIVE Recipe: Mediterranean-style cracked olives

    Makes 10 pounds of olives

    • 10 pounds of green olives
    • 1 1/2 cups pickling or kosher salt (not iodized)
    • 2 cups white wine vinegar
    • Herbs, garlic, lemon, or other seasonings
    • Airtight, food grade plastic or glass containers

    Method:

    1. Sort the olives and discard any bruised or defective fruit. Rinse the olives in water and drain.

    2. Place olives one or two at a time on cutting board and strike it with a rubber mallet, rolling pin or stone. Crush each olive just to crack the flesh-do not break the pits or remove them.

    3. Place the olives into a food grade pale or glass jar and cover with fresh water. Keep olives submerged in the pale by using a plate or a plastic ziplock filled with water. Look for a jar that is easy to drain.

    4. Every 24 hours drain the olives and replace with fresh water. Do this for six or seven days until you no longer taste any bitterness. If you do taste some bitterness keep soaking until they are not bitter but not so long that they become bland.

    5. Prepare the finish brine — add 1 pound (about 1.5 cups) of salt to 1 gallon of cool water, stir to dissolve, and add 2 cups of white vinegar. This will be enough to treat 10 pounds of olives.

    6. Drain the debittered olives and cover with the finishing brine. At this point you can add herbs and other seasonings if desired. Consider some fresh oregano leaves, a clove of peeled, bruised garlic and a few thin slices of lemon. Close the lid tightly and keep refrigerated for 4 days or you can allow the flavors to develop more fully during longer storage.

    7. These olives can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 year in the finish brine. Drain and serve with a little dribble of olive oil.

    Recipe from Roger Wolfe, Dos Aguilas Olive Oil, Aptos

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    Makes 10 pounds of olives10 pounds of green olives 1 1/2 cups pickling or kosher salt (not iodized) 2 cups white wine vinegar Herbs, garlic, lemon, or other seasonings Airtight, food grade plastic or glass containersMethod: 1. Sort the olives and discard any bruised or defective... 
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  • Will British Rapeseed Oil (Canola) Set To Replace Olive Oil In Consumer Shopping Baskets?

    Sales of British cold pressed rapeseed oil are set to soar as health conscious consumers look for a lower fat alternative to olive oil.

    In a recent independent survey of over 1100 UK consumers, 58 per cent of respondents said they would consider switching from olive to rapeseed oil when it was explained that it is less than half the saturated fat of olive oil and is produced in Britain.

    A further six per cent said that the higher burn point of the product (the stage when a cooking fat begins to smoke or burn) would be enough to encourage them to choose rapeseed oil over olive oil during their next supermarket shop.

    Ben Guy, managing director of Borderfields, the company that commissioned the independent survey and the leading producer of rapeseed oil in the UK, said:

    “The Mediterranean diet has traditionally been seen as healthier than the British diet due to its reliance on olive oil. That could all be about to change as British consumers are becoming more educated on the health, economic and environmental benefits of rapeseed oil.”

    “Not only is cold pressed rapeseed oil half the saturated fat of olive oil, but it also contains omegas 3, 6 and 9; essential fatty acids known to reduce cholesterol and maintain a healthy heart, brain function and joint mobility. It is also completely natural – free from additives and processing”

    Consumers all over the UK are voting with their shopping baskets. Volume demand for bottles of rapeseed oil has grown by 11.5 per cent across all sellers in the last year, according to retail analysts Kantar, while sales of extra virgin olive oil have fallen by 0.9%.

    Tesco, which stocks Borderfields, has seen sales of rapeseed oil increase by 60 per cent in the last year alone.

    Such is the demand that Borderfields is now successfully selling its cold pressed rapeseed oil infused with a variety of flavours plus a range of seasonal salad dressings.

    Ben Guy added: “We are starting to see a real tipping point in demand. It’s not difficult to appreciate the benefits of rapeseed over olive oil. It scores top marks for being healthy, local, environmentally friendly and tasty. I think that message is starting to get through to consumers.”

    There is a growing interest from celebrity chefs around the country who like its versatile nature. Michelin Star Chef Kenny Atkinson said: “Rapeseed oil can be used as a healthy butter and margarine replacement for baking as well as for dressings and dipping. It makes the best roast potatoes and excellent mayonnaise. I wouldn’t be without it in my kitchen.”

    comparison of dietary fats

    Canola oil used to be called RAPESEED oil but the name was changed for marketing reasons
    The term canola was coined from “Canadian oil, low acid” to convince consumers that this oil was safe to eat. And while “canola” was originally a registered trademark, the term became so widely known that the trademark was eventually abandoned, and “canola” became the default term in many countries for any low-erucic rapeseed oil.

    sources sys-con, naturalnews

     

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    Sales of British cold pressed rapeseed oil are set to soar as health conscious consumers look for a lower fat alternative to olive oil. In a recent independent survey of over 1100 UK consumers, 58 per cent of respondents said they would consider switching from olive to rapeseed... 
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  • Argentina’s Olive Oil Industry In Crisis

    Unlike the country’s wine industry, which benefits from a strong internal market, the olive oil industry in Argentina is largely export-based, with 75 percent of the roughly 30,000 metric tons of oil produced annually being sold abroad. The table olive market is even more lopsided, exporting about 95 percent of its yearly production.

    With the costs of production rising, Argentine olive oil exports are struggling to compete on the world stage. While production volume has remained more or less constant, exports are down and there’s not a big enough internal market to absorb the difference. The resulting surplus and lackluster sales have pushed the industry into a desperate situation, with layoffs and factory closings becoming the norm, particularly among the larger producers.

    read more at oliveoiltimes

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    Unlike the country’s wine industry, which benefits from a strong internal market, the olive oil industry in Argentina is largely export-based, with 75 percent of the roughly 30,000 metric tons of oil produced annually being sold abroad. The table olive market is even more lopsided,... 
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  • The olive harvest has begun at B.R.

    The falling olives clattered onto plastic tarps like rain hitting tin roofs, knocked loose by workers with long wooden shafts that seemed fit for pole vaulting.

    The olive harvest has begun at B.R. Cohn Winery near Glen Ellen and at a number of other North Bay orchards. The olives, which will be pressed into artisan cooking and tasting oils, make up a small but growing crop with a premium cachet.

    Growers say the harvest has begun a few weeks earlier than usual. “Just like the grapes, the olives are coming in earlier this year,” said Samantha Dorsey, the farming manager for McEvoy Ranch outside Petaluma. It appears to be due to warmer summer days.

    Olives often are found at wineries. The two crops not only prefer the same climate, growers said, but their harvests occur at different times. And most wineries have the means to get the olive oils into consumers hands.

    “If you have a tasting room, you can do direct sales,” said Alexandra Kicenik Devarenne, an olive oil consultant and educators. “Plus the fact that they taste great together.”

    In 2002, agriculture officials estimated that Sonoma County had 77 acres of bearing olive trees. Five years later, that number had grown to 285 acres. And by last year, olives took up 705 acres. Still, the olive harvest’s estimated farm value of $165,000 represents a sliver of the county’s $821 million total for all crops last year. Of that total, winegrapes comprised nearly $583 million.

    At B.R. Cohn Winery, many of the nearly 500 olive trees are believed to have been planted in the 1870s and were well established when the winery opened there nearly 40 years ago.

    The harvest is done by hand.

    “It’s so labor intensive,” said Daniel Cohn, a principal at the family-owned winery. The production costs make the olive oil akin to “liquid gold,” Cohn said. A 200 milliliter bottle sells for $25.

    Across the valley, on a hill near Jack London State Park, Chris Benziger and a crew of workers were gathered around a handful of the 800 olive trees planted at Benziger Winery. He said the olive harvest requires a lot of interaction among the crew.

    “It’s super sociable,” he said. “I look forward to it.”

    The winery is planning to plant a few hundred more trees in a low spot where grapes never did very well. He looked it over, pointing to a few sheep fenced off from existing olive trees and grapevines and said, “You can almost think you’re in Greece or Italy.”

    Outside Healdsburg, the DaVero farm has just started harvesting, said Colleen McGlynn, an owner with her husband Ridgely Evers. The farm has 4,500 olive trees.

    “The crop looks light again this year, McGlynn said. The harvest normally would be closer to Thanksgiving, she said.

    Olives are a cyclical crop, said Devarenne. A bumper crop is often followed by a lighter one. “In general, this year’s yields seem to be considerably down,” Devarenne said.

    Dorsey said many farms this year have been hit by an infestation of the olive fruit fly.

    The 80 acres of olives at McEvoy Ranch have escaped harm, she said. But the ranch presses olives for about 100 growers and Dorsey has heard complaints of significant crop damage on farms from Santa Barbara to Ukiah. Still, those interviewed said the county will continue to produce premium olive oils.

    “There’s so many fantastic producers in this area,” Dorsey said. “I feel there’s a producer in our area for every style.”

    Article source pressdemocrat

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    The falling olives clattered onto plastic tarps like rain hitting tin roofs, knocked loose by workers with long wooden shafts that seemed fit for pole vaulting. The olive harvest has begun at B.R. Cohn Winery near Glen Ellen and at a number of other North Bay orchards. The olives,... 
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  • New tasting gallery features olive oil and balsamic vinegar

    Walk into Weyira Olive Oil & Vinegar Tasting Gallery, and you know you’re in a different kind of store. The walls are orange. Floor and ceiling are spring green. Rows of stainless steel jugs stand on dark wood tables.

    Inside the jugs are dozens of different olive oils and balsamic vinegars — classic ingredients of traditional cooking around the world, particularly around the Mediterranean Sea. Cards on each jug identify oils from Italy, California, Peru, Morocco.

    At Weyira, visitors can sample olive oils and balsamic vinegars before buying. Store owner Sihin Tsegaye (see-HEEN seh-KI) said Weyira appeals to foodies who value fine foods, but it’s also good for people learning about fine foods for the first time.

    “When people come here, they educate themselves,” said Tsegaye. “They don’t just buy product and leave. They educate themselves on what they get (with) the information on the cards.”

    High-end in Hagerstown

    Vinegar Tasting GalleryTsegaye said she and her family moved to Hagerstown in 2006. She is originally from Ethiopia. She said she saw a business opportunity here in Hagerstown.

    “I used to work for a nonprofit. The company ended up moving to Chicago. I decided not to relocate (to Chicago)” she said. “I’ve been looking for good product, and I fell in love with olive oil. After that decision, I said, I will do it in Hagerstown. People said, ‘You’re crazy. This is a small town. Don’t do it.’ I said, ‘People live here. I know this is an upscale product, but I know people … go somewhere else to get this product. Why don’t I give it a try?’ So I decided on that.”

    Tsegaye opened Weyira in September in Long Meadow Shopping Center on the north side of Hagerstown. The store has five tables of products —three tables of oils and two tables of vinegars. She sells extra-virgin olive oils and flavored olive oils. Flavored oils are either infused — dried herbs or fruit added to oil to give flavor, similar to making tea — or fused, in which fresh herbs and fruits are crushed with olives when the olive oil is first produced.

    In the weeks after Tsegaye opened her store, foot traffic was steady, she said. Hagers-tonians, it seems, do seem to want high-quality olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

    The terroir of oil

    Many Americans prefer that commercial, mass-produced cheddar cheeses made in New York taste identical to cheddars made in Illinois or California.

    The same is true of vegetable oils, fruit juices, chocolates and hundreds of other mass-produced food products. Consistent flavors and low prices are important to American shoppers.

    But Europeans take a different view of foods. They value the distinct flavors of a blue cheese from Italy or England or France. They value the distinct flavors of wines, chocolates and breads from different countries.

    Which brings us back to the olive oils in Weyira. In American grocery stores, all olive oils are more or less the same. Packaging doesn’t highlight the types of olives used to produce the oil or promote the distinct flavor profile of the oil.

    Each of Tsegaye’s oils is unique, with a distinct flavor profile. She wants her customers to know about each oils origins. Her oil jugs, called fusli, have cards atop them describing the oil within. The card lists the type of olive used and the country of origin. It also describes the chemical analysis of the oil — the percentage of oleic acid, the polyphenol count, the peroxide value and the DAG score. Together, this analysis indicates the freshness and quality of the oil.

    A valuable oil

    For centuries, olive oil has been used for cooking, for ceremonial use, in cosmetics and for burning in lamps to make light. As a food, olive oil is high in antioxidants and vitamins E and K and low in cholesterol. Professional cooks consider olive oil the best oil for eating fresh or for cooking foods at moderate temperatures.

    “A lot of universities and health centers are doing research on olive oils and discovering the benefits,” Tsegaye said. “So I think that’s why it’s getting really popular.”

    Mostly, she focuses on the culinary aspects of olive oil. She sells oils ranked highly at international olive oil tastings.

    “Every year, there is a competition,” she said. “There are olive oil testers all over the world. They say, ‘This is No. 1, No. 2, No. 3.’ Most of my olive oils are best of their class. Like this one, (made of Peruvian) picual (olives), it competed for three years and it was people’s choice — that’s what I sell.”

    A valuable oil

    For centuries, olive oil has been used for cooking, for ceremonial use, in cosmetics and for burning in lamps to make light. As a food, olive oil is high in antioxidants and vitamins E and K and low in cholesterol. Professional cooks consider olive oil the best oil for eating fresh or for cooking foods at moderate temperatures.

    “A lot of universities and health centers are doing research on olive oils and discovering the benefits,” Tsegaye said. “So I think that’s why it’s getting really popular.”

    Mostly, she focuses on the culinary aspects of olive oil. She sells oils ranked highly at international olive oil tastings.

    “Every year, there is a competition,” she said. “There are olive oil testers all over the world. They say, ‘This is No. 1, No. 2, No. 3.’ Most of my olive oils are best of their class. Like this one, (made of Peruvian) picual (olives), it competed for three years and it was people’s choice — that’s what I sell.”

    Olive oil 101

    To make olive oil, olives are crushed and pressed as soon after harvest as possible. Traditionally, olives are crushed under large, wheel-shaped stones. Newer techniques finely grind olives, pits and all, between two stones. Later, the pits are filtered out.

    Extracting the oil has also undergone a technological upgrade. The centuries-old technique involved pressing olive mash under heavy weight. Some producers still use this method. Contemporary producers use spinning centrifuges to extract olive oil.

    The best-quality oil —extra virgin olive oil, or EVOO — is produced without heating the olive oil. Heat extracts more oil, but also degrades quality.

    Tsegaye offers customers tastes of her oils in small plastic cups. Once a customer make a purchase, she decants the oil into dark glass bottles.

    “If you go to supermarket, you find, a lot of time, olive oil is stored in clear bottles. They put it in the light. That olive oil has already lost all the nutrition and health benefits,” she said. “Once you buy our oil, we put it in a dark bottle. And then you have to (store) it in a dark place, not to expose it to light or heat, and it will be good for one year.”

    Like oil and vinegar

    To go with her olive oils, Tsegaye sells a variety of quality balsamic vinegars. This type of vinegar is nothing like white vinegar sold at the grocery store, she said.

    “If you try the supermarket vinegar, you don’t get flavor,” she said. “Here, whichever vinegar you sample, you get different, distinct flavor.”

    Balsamic vinegar is fermented like wine, she said, but all alcohol is fermented out. The resulting product is thick, rich and very slightly sweet. It is typically aged for three years, five years, eight years or even longer. Tsegaye offers a 18-year-old vinegar.

    “It gets better, tastewise, as it ages,” she said.

    As with the olive oils, some vinegars are simple and unflavored while others are flavored.

    “We have black — dark — and white vinegar,” she said. “In the (flavored) white ones, there is cranberry-pear, Sicilian lemon, jalapeno — it depends on your choice of flavor.”

    Balsamic vinegars are eaten fresh, as in salad dressing, or used in cooking to add complex, sharp flavor. Some people serve a shot of aged balsamic vinegar as a zesty drink.

    So far, Tsegaye is happy with the way her business is going. And she’s happy to see people educating themselves on vinegar and olive oil.

    “I was looking for a product that is a good product. I believe in it. And then I can tell people how to use it and get benefit out of it,” she said. “Someone comes here, we let them know what are on different tables. They look around and see what they would like to try. And then, they try it.”

    source heraldmailmedia

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    Walk into Weyira Olive Oil & Vinegar Tasting Gallery, and you know you’re in a different kind of store. The walls are orange. Floor and ceiling are spring green. Rows of stainless steel jugs stand on dark wood tables. Inside the jugs are dozens of different olive oils and... 
    Read More →
  • Olive-Oil Production Rebound Seen Weighing on Prices in Spain

    Global production of olive oil is set to rebound 29 percent from last year, sending prices in Spain to a 10-month low, Oil World said.

    Output may gain to 3.38 million metric tons in the 2013-14 season from the prior year’s “unusually low” 2.63 million tons, the Hamburg-based researcher said today in an e-mailed report. Prices for the extra-virgin variety in Spain, the world’s biggest producer, fell to a low of $3.25 a kilogram (2.2 pounds) in the past week, down 13 percent since June, it said.

    Spanish output may be 1.5 million tons, more than double last year, when dry weather hurt crops, the report showed. Production in the southern province of Jaen exceeds Greece’s entire national output, according to the Olive Oil From Spain website, set up by groups including Asoliva, which represents Spanish exporters of the oil.

    “Olive-oil prices have been under pressure in recent weeks in response to the clear-cut recovery of production in the Mediterranean region,” Oil World said. “In Spain, the much-improved weather conditions will result in a significant recovery of yields and production.”

    Rising output in Italy and Portugal may make up for declines in Greece and Tunisia, the researcher said. Some olive trees in Argentina and Chile were damaged by frost, though “the impact on the world market will be relatively small,” according to the report.

    Global inventories of olive oil may be 790,000 tons by the end of the season on Sept. 30, up from 650,000 tons a year earlier, when supplies reached a four-year low, Oil World said. Demand in the European Union may gain 2.9 percent this season to 1.8 million tons, rebounding from a 13 percent slump caused by concern about the economy and higher prices for the oil, according to the report.

    Source bloomberg

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    Global production of olive oil is set to rebound 29 percent from last year, sending prices in Spain to a 10-month low, Oil World said. Output may gain to 3.38 million metric tons in the 2013-14 season from the prior year’s “unusually low” 2.63 million tons, the Hamburg-based... 
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  • Price of olives soars by 50% as bad weather in Greece leads to shortage of the crop

    Many Greek farmers reporting little or no green olive yield this year and problem made worse following Spanish olive drought in the summer comes as further bad news for foodies after this year’s almond shortage.

    Green olives, a dinner party staple, could soon shoot up in price after bad weather in the Greece put them in short supply.

    An olive farm in the Greek countryside close to Patelidas in the Halkidiki region of northern Greece producing Premium olives, are set to cost up to 50 per cent more, after poor conditions in the region where they are grown affected the harvest.

    Farmers have reported that crop yields are down by up to 80 per cent, meaning that anyone wanting to enjoy them in the UK will have to pay more.

    This could mean that 150g of pitted green olives at a supermarket would cost shoppers £3, instead of their usual price of around £2.

    The problem is worsened by the fact that earlier this year, the effects of a drought in Spain and areas of Southern Europe saw production of Spanish olives falter too.

    With suppliers looking to Greece to bridge the gap, the disappointing final yield is now set to affect prices of premium and chilled olives, which are often sold stuffed in supermarkets and delis.

    Halkidiki olives, which are known for their pleasant, sour taste, are traditionally harvested from the middle of September.

    But much of this year’s crop fell foul of unusually high temperatures, with many growers seeing little or no olives produced.

    And the problem has prompted many Greeks call for action from the European Parliament, to help them through the olive growing crisis.

    The crop, forms a large part of Greece’s export trade, and a poor harvest could spell trouble for the country’s struggling economy.

    According to the Olive Oil Times website, left wing Greek MEP Nikos Chountis spoke for the growers earlier this year, and opened a discussion on whether the current conservative government is doing enough to help.

    Speaking during a session of the European Parliament, he said: ‘What other actions can be taken directly by the Greek government to give a boost to one of our most important economic exports?’

    The olive crisis is further bad news for lovers of delicacies in Britain.

    Chocoholics have been forced to scour the shops for their favourite Green & Black’s organic chocolate and almond bar after a nut shortage saw the sweet treat sell out.

    Retailers up and down the country have seen demand for the upmarket treat, which costs £2.29 for a 100g bar, by far outstrip supply in recent weeks.

    Both Waitrose and Wholefoods have confirmed that they have already sold out.

    The unexpected shortage is believed to have been caused by problem in the supply of almonds, which are imported from harvesters in Europe and America.

    California, which grows 80 per cent of the world’s almonds, suffered under the effects of a prolonged drought which led to smaller nuts being harvested this year.

    source dailymail

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    Many Greek farmers reporting little or no green olive yield this year and problem made worse following Spanish olive drought in the summer comes as further bad news for foodies after this year’s almond shortage. Green olives, a dinner party staple, could soon shoot up in... 
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  • New food scandals lead consumers to wonder about "what they can eat"

    Taiwan is facing another food scandal involving edible oils, like those that had emerged last spring. On 18 October, a large firm, Tatung Changchi Foodstuff Factory Co. Ltd. (大 统 长 基 食品), was fined NT$ 28 million Taiwanese dollars (US$ 950,000) for selling adulterated olive oil, labelled 100 per cent olive oil.

    Adulterated edible oils have become a problem. In some cases, a number of products, supposedly made with peanut and chili oil, have come under the scrutiny of the authorities because they contained neither peanut nor chili oil. In one case involving olive oil, what was labelled ‘completely’ natural olive oil had in fact an additive. Known as E141 in Europe, the substance is a copper complex of chlorophyllins (铜 叶绿素) that gives the product a green colouring.

    Despite the crackdown, activist groups are not impressed because fines have so far been very low compared to the billions in Taiwanese dollars earned every year.

    Given how hard it is to sift through all the natural and artificial ingredients, it took Taiwan’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA, 食品 药物 管理局) about a month to check all the cases.

    On 19 October, the agency held a press conference to make public its findings about the adulterated oils and announce the hefty fines it was imposing on the culprits.

    However this week, another company, Flavor Full Foods (富味鄉食品公司), was caught selling products containing cottonseed oil (棉籽油), a substance that is banned in Taiwan as an edible oil.

    Initially, the company denied its products included banned ingredients, but further tests found that, 24 of them, on sale in Taiwanese supermarkets, contained the banned oil, which resulted in a fine of NT$ 8 million (US$ 275,000).

    Source asianews

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    Taiwan is facing another food scandal involving edible oils, like those that had emerged last spring. On 18 October, a large firm, Tatung Changchi Foodstuff Factory Co. Ltd. (大 统 长 基 食品), was fined NT$ 28 million Taiwanese dollars (US$ 950,000) for selling adulterated... 
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  • Oil Asia - China (Beijing) International Olive Oil& Edible Oil Industry Expo - November 25 - 27, 2013

    China’s most authoritative oil, olive oil, public service trade cooperation and professional brand-building platform.

    The most attractive cities:
    As China‘s economic center, Beijing and Shanghai has become the first major exhibition cities, professional exhibition held in Beijing and Shanghai, effects of radiation around the world, while Beijing and Shanghai are the world‘s top 500 enterprises in China‘s headquarters, the Beijing and Shanghai Expo will attract more domestic and overseas dealers.

    High-level exchange platform:
    Held in conjunction with industry, industry development forum for the sustainable development of enterprise solutions.

    Huge audience database:
    Oil Asia has been familiar with the edible oil industry for years, 50,000 professional visitors and exhibitors database is a strong guarantee for the actual show results.

    Oil Asia Activities:
    – International High-End Edible Oil Development Summit Forum, 2013
    – Olive Oil Brands Promotion Meeting, 2013
    – Tea Oil Brands Promotion Meeting, 2013
    – Second Olive Oil Babe Model Tournament and Walk Show of “Olive Oil” Cup
    – Spain Olive Oil Brand Promotion Meeting
    – Olive Oil Tasting and Appraisal

    Oil Asia Awards:
    2013 Oil Asia awards event will be held in the Assembly Awards “Gold”; “New Products” award; “Quality Product” award; “safe and healthy nutritional edible oil certificate” (related to the conditions and fees please eligible to request the General Assembly staff )

    Location
    China International Exhibition CenterBeijing, China

    Website
    First Year of Event 2008
    Frequency Annual

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    China’s most authoritative oil, olive oil, public service trade cooperation and professional brand-building platform. The most attractive cities: As China‘s economic center, Beijing and Shanghai has become the first major exhibition cities, professional exhibition held... 
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  • The San Diego Bay Wine & Gourmed Food Festival - November 20 - 24, 2013

    The San Diego Bay Wine & Food Festival is an international showcase of the world’s premier wine and spirits, chefs and culinary personalities, and gourmet foods.

    Producers of the San Diego Bay Wine & Food Festival have a partnership with the California Olive Oil Council and its sponsorship of the Festival’s annual olive oil competition and tasting. The California Olive Oil Council (COOC) Tasting Panel serve as judges for the Festival’s competition.

    Location:
    Embarcadero Marina Park NorthSan Diego, CA, 92101, United States

    Website

    More info at oliveoilsource

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    The San Diego Bay Wine & Food Festival is an international showcase of the world’s premier wine and spirits, chefs and culinary personalities, and gourmet foods. Producers of the San Diego Bay Wine & Food Festival have a partnership with the California Olive Oil... 
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  • Community Milling days at Dry Creek Olive Oil

    Community Milling days are open to the public – no need to bring olives to join in the fun!
    Dry Creek Olive Company’s Community Milling days are the ideal way for the small grower to produce oil from their trees and celebrate the harvest! Come enjoy the “fruit” of your labors with friends and neighbors.

    The “field blending” created by combining neighbors’ olives produces amazing oils! DCOO found that some of the most flavorful oils have been produced at Community Milling day

    This is how it works: Olives delivered by customers on these days are combined and milled together into oil. The percentage of the total weight you contribute is directly proportional to the percentage of oil you receive once the olives are milled.

    All olives delivered are inspected, and are to be free of olive fly, rot, fungus or excessive bruising damage. Ideal storage containers include: plastic 5 gallon buckets, clean trash cans and macro-bins. Please do not store your olives in plastic garbage bags as they tend to rot more readily. To help ensure the quality of your olives, we recommend picking them within 24 hrs of bringing them to the mill and storing them in a cool, well-ventilated place.

    Your oil will be ready for pickup at our Tasting Room one week following Community Milling Day. Plastic, food-grade containers are supplied at a nominal price. DCOO will only accept clean and dry, well-marked, food-grade plastic containers for oil collection.

    Olives are collected from 9:00am to 2:00pm. The earlier the better, DCOO will not accept olives after 2 p.m. They accept amounts from 5 lbs to 800 lbs at a rate of $0.80/lb. There are no additional waste removal fees for Community Milling – ‘the pomace is on us’!

    All community milling customers, club members patrons of Dry Creek Olive Oil tasting room are welcome to join in on these days (with or without olives) and celebrate the harvest.

    Information on milling rates and scheduling: Contact DCOO at 707-431-7200, ext 5. or email at info@trattorefarms.com.

    source geyserville

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    Community Milling days are open to the public – no need to bring olives to join in the fun! Dry Creek Olive Company’s Community Milling days are the ideal way for the small grower to produce oil from their trees and celebrate the harvest! Come enjoy the “fruit” of your... 
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  • Greek Artisans: Philosophy Lecturer and Historian Produce Olive Oil and Desserts

    Since 1997, the “Greek Artisans” Dimitris Portolos and Christos Carras export Greek traditional products with great success.

    Dimitris Portolos is a businessman, a historian, a co-founder and general secretary of the Hellenic Literary and Historical Archive. Christos Carras was the winemaker of the exceptional Chateau Carras. He studied philosophy in Sorbonne, and he is also a musician.

    Their products are being exported in ten countries in four different continents. The two businessmen want to highlight the natural flavor of the fruits without adding excessive amounts of sugar, which unfortunately is the case with the vast majority of greek sweets. That is why they are included in the menu of the famous greek restaurants “Milos” in New York and Montreal, where Woody Allen tasted Greek Artisans’ honey and sent them a congratulation letter.

    As Dimitris Portolos says to athinorama.gr “we don’t mix ten products just to impress. We use less in the right proportions, in order to retain harmony in the composition.”

    “Greek Artisans” mainly produce thyme honey, jams and traditional greek spoon desserts, but also other products like olives from Kalamata, caper and sun-dried tomatoes. There is, of course, the famous Stater olive oil from Chalkidiki, with its unique and spicy flavor.

    Source greekreporter

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    Since 1997, the “Greek Artisans” Dimitris Portolos and Christos Carras export Greek traditional products with great success. Dimitris Portolos is a businessman, a historian, a co-founder and general secretary of the Hellenic Literary and Historical Archive. Christos Carras... 
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  • 2013 Harvest: average yield, high quality reports California table olive grower-producer

    Gigantic green olive made from adobe and speared with a giant red toothpick made from steel marks the orchard of Corning, California-based West Coast Products-Olinda Brand table olive and olive oil company. Orchard owners commissioned the sculpture in recognition of California’s traditional olive industry.

    Olinda Brand olivesWest Coast Products – Olinda Brand, a Northern California table olive grower and processor, today announced the completion of its 2013 harvest and cites an average crop yield with very strong quality. “We took in about a thousand tons, including 20 percent from smaller farms,” said Dan Vecere, general manager, West Coast Products-Olinda Brand.

    Olinda Brand olives are Sevillano (Seh-vee-yah-noh), one of the largest green specialty varieties sometimes called the “Spanish Queen,” and must be hand-picked to protect them from damage such as bruising. Approximately 40 agricultural workers harvested West Coast Products’ 88-acre orchard’s 7,000 trees in three weeks during the 2013 harvest.

    According to Vecere, the olive crop sizes were excellent this year.

    “With green Sevillanos we like to see the bigger fruit, which have stronger flavor and taste. Our customers will really enjoy the 2014 olive products since this season’s harvest included the best of the top sizes – super colossal, colossal, and jumbo.” Vecere emphasized that because of the natural curing process it takes 10-to-12 months to bring these olives from orchard to market.

    Harvest season also means the California table olive industry has a multiplier effect, which spurs economic growth noted Adin Hester, president of the Olive Growers Council of California.

    “When a company like West Coast Products-Olinda Brand purchases olives from the smaller ranchers (less than 20-acre parcels) at several hundred dollars a ton it pumps hundreds of thousands of dollars back into the economy and leverages spending and growth in the state,” said Hester.

    Nearly half of the table olives in California are grown in the Sacramento Valley. Industry leaders report table olive production in Glenn County, where West Coast Products-Olinda Brand is situated, surpassed the $20 million mark in 2012.

    About West Coast Products and the Olinda BrandSince 1937, West Coast Products of Northern California has provided professional and home kitchens with specialty olives and olive oils under the Olinda Brand. The company’s commitment to natural, fresh, and in-season premium private-label table olives and private-label olive oils meets the highest standards of California state certification, which ensures top quality olive products.

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    Gigantic green olive made from adobe and speared with a giant red toothpick made from steel marks the orchard of Corning, California-based West Coast Products-Olinda Brand table olive and olive oil company. Orchard owners commissioned the sculpture in recognition of California’s... 
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  • The designer Norma Kamali and an olive grove in Provence

    Remember that 1970s poster of Farrah Fawcett in a red one-piece bathing suit? Those itty-bitty fringe shorts on Beyoncé in her “Run the World (Girls)” video? The vintage wedding dress Lady Gaga wore in her “You and I” video? All Kamali.

    Yet one of the most enduring threads in Ms. Kamali’s life has nothing to do with prêt-à-porter: olive oil. “I’ve had this obsession with olive oil my whole life,” she said. Her mother, who was Lebanese, used it as a massage oil, moisturizer, salt scrub and digestive aid. She slathered olive oil in Ms. Kamali’s hair to protect it in the summer, and she kept olive oil in the fridge so her daughter could spread it on bread. She even used it to strip paint off furniture.

    As an adult, Ms. Kamali spent years scouring stores for soaps and creams made with olive oil, though her quest truly began in 2001, during the World Series at Yankee Stadium. She happened to be sitting near a man from Barcelona, Spain, who mentioned that he was planning to bring the best oils from the olive belt in southern Europe to the states. Ms. Kamali revealed her olive obsession and soon had herself an invitation to tag along.

    So began the first of what would become a decade of road trips from Barcelona along the coast of Spain and into France and Italy. But of all the orchards that Ms. Kamali has ever visited along the way, her favorite is in Provence, in the South of France, where she thinks the best olive oil in the world is made. “If there was a description of what heaven looks like,” she said, “I would say this is it.”

    Read more nytimes

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    Remember that 1970s poster of Farrah Fawcett in a red one-piece bathing suit? Those itty-bitty fringe shorts on Beyoncé in her “Run the World (Girls)” video? The vintage wedding dress Lady Gaga wore in her “You and I” video? All Kamali. Yet one of the most enduring threads... 
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  • Israel’s 980-Year-Old Olive Tree Celebrated in ‘Days of the Olive Branch’ Festival

    Israel’s “Days of the Olive Branch” Festival, the 19th edition of the celebration of the Jewish state’s historic role in the olive and olive oil business, including playing host to the world’s oldest olive tree, kicked off this week in the Galilee, Israel’s Ma’ariv daily reported.

    The oldest olive tree, estimated by some to be 980 years old and by others to be 3,000 years old, is located in nearby Deir Hanna in the Lower Galilee region, and belongs to the family of Hassan Khatib, who lives in the village.

    Its circumference is 8.7 meters, as wide as eight people holding hands around it. The most surprising thing about the old tree is that it still produces about 20 kg of olive oil per year.

    “This tree is a living sculpture. Think how much oil this tree gave over the years. All the families it provided for” Dr. Ali Abbas, a member of the Israeli Plants Council, told Ma’ariv.

    Dr. Abbas said that historians once believed that Romans brought the olive tree to Israel, but the discovery of a 6,000-year-old press in Israel shows that the industry began in the Jewish state, before being exported to Greece, Italy and Spain, today, the world’s largest olive oil producers.

    Israel today produces 20,000 tons of olive oil each year, which is roughly equal to annual domestic consumption. Each Israeli consumes an average of 3 kg of oil per year. In Spain, average consumption is between 9 and 10 kg per person per year and, in Greece, it’s 24 kg.

    Olive oil is one of the most powerful natural antioxidants and contains a large amount of vitamin E.

    source algemeiner

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    Israel’s “Days of the Olive Branch” Festival, the 19th edition of the celebration of the Jewish state’s historic role in the olive and olive oil business, including playing host to the world’s oldest olive tree, kicked off this week in the Galilee, Israel’s Ma’ariv... 
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  • Battling with unhealthy hair? Use olive oil

    Granny’s old tradition of oiling hair is every girl’s favorite as it leaves the hair smooth and glossy but we all want to know, the best oil for our hair which will say goodbye to all hair issues and bless us with perfect locks so we bring to you the benefits of olive oil, which can keep several hair issues at bay in no time. Read on, to know them and get ready to flaunt beautiful tresses.

    Olive oil is said to be the best oil and advised by several celebrities and hair experts too. Well, if frizzy hair has been the cause of worry in your case and you feel helpless, keep stress aside and experiment with olive oil which will make your hair manageable and presentable by adding moisture to your locks. Yes, you read it right. Now, you need not make use of those pricey products that contain a whole lot of chemicals and damage your hair in the long run. Yes, they promise tall tales yet provide you with a temporary bliss so add olive oil to your daily hair care regimen and say goodbye to unmanageable, dry, frizzy hair.

    Split ends are another cause of worry among most people which make them lose their beloved hair. Yes, you feel you have no way but to get your hair cut but now you need not rush to a salon to get rid of your split ends by compromising with your hair length. All you need to do is pre heat olive oil and apply on your hair ends. Leave it for about an hour and rinse off. Make sure, you massage your hair ends well, before shampooing them. Repeat this method twice a week for best results.

    There are times, when our scalp problems leave us embarrassed in front of many and the reason is dandruff. Well, if you have been battling with dandruff and constant efforts have also done no good to you, it’s time for you to experiment with olive oil. Apply it on your scalp for an hour and wash off. Repeat this method thrice a week and you can step out with confidence and clear scalp, in no time.

    It’s time, you stop making a hole in your pocket by visiting salons for hair and scalp problems. You just need one product that will say goodbye to all your hair issues and yes to healthy, beautiful hair which you can flaunt with confidence, so update your regimen and bless your hair by spending time on hair care because you deserve glossy, beautiful locks.

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    Granny’s old tradition of oiling hair is every girl’s favorite as it leaves the hair smooth and glossy but we all want to know, the best oil for our hair which will say goodbye to all hair issues and bless us with perfect locks so we bring to you the benefits of olive... 
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    Olive Oil Industry Growing in Georgia

    On Highway 341 near Hawkinsville in Pulaski County, among the peanut and pecan farms, there’s a field of olive trees.

    Manse Jennings of Jennings Orchards says his grandfather once used the land for cows. Now he’s using the land to farm olives that can eventually be used to make olive oil.

    Currently, 98% of the United States’ olive oil is imported from other countries. Much of the U.S. production is in California, where Jennings got his trees from.

    Now, Georgia is beginning to grow its olive industry. There’s another olive farm further south in Lakeland, but Jennings’ orchard is one of the furthest north olives have been able to grow.

    This year, he harvested around 13,000 pounds of olives, and says that number could triple in a few years when the plant is fully matured.

    Jennings says the growing industry wouldn’t just benefit the Georgia economy, it would also provide people better quality olive oil. Jennings says European countries like Spain, Italy, and Greece often send over their lowest quality oil to the U.S. after saving the higher quality olives for themselves.

    Jennings says his olive farm won’t be profitable until a few years when the larger crop brings in money. He says for now, he’s focusing on getting the word out to the public about Georgia-grown olives.

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    VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
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    On Highway 341 near Hawkinsville in Pulaski County, among the peanut and pecan farms, there’s a field of olive trees. Manse Jennings of Jennings Orchards says his grandfather once used the land for cows. Now he’s using the land to farm olives that can eventually be... 
    Read More →