Monthly Archives: August 2013

  • 10 ESSENTIAL TIPS ABOUT OLIVE OIL Did you know...?

    Olive Oil, the hero ingredient of the Mediterranean Diet

    • The acidity in olive oil does not affect the flavour; the acidity indicates the level of free fatty acids
    • Infused/flavoured olive oils can easily be prepared at home
    • Olive oil is an indispensable ingredient in the best bakeries and patisseries

    Consumers are increasingly aware of the benefits of healthy eating and for this reason, the Mediterranean Diet is one of the most frequently recommended for those who wish to lead a healthy lifestyle. However, while olive oil is a product with a rich tradition, some of its most important qualities are not necessarily widely known about.

    Below explained some of the key characteristics of olive oil which has become a fundamental ingredient for cooking and preparing food:

    10 Essential Tips about Olive Oil:

    1. How many different types of olive oil are available?
    There are three principal types: Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Virgin Olive Oil and ordinary Olive Oil. The type is always indicated on the packaging. It is important to note that the quality of the oil in all these categories does not depend on the variety of olive from which it is made.

    a. Extra Virgin Olive Oil: The highest category of olive oil is obtained directly from the olives, using solely mechanical processes (washing, milling, centrifugation or pressing, decantation and/or filtering). This type of olive oil has an excellent aroma and flavour and under 0.8% acidity (current legal requirement).

    b. Virgin Olive Oil: Olive oil obtained directly from the olives, extracting the oil by mechanical processes (washing, milling, centrifugation or pressing, decantation and/or filtering). This type of olive oil has a pleasant aroma and flavour, and under 2% acidity (current legal requirement).

    c. Olive Oil: Olive oil containing a mixture of refined olive oil and virgin olive oil. This grade of olive oil contains only oils that have been refined (which affects the aroma, colour and acidity content) and oil obtained directly from olives using mechanical processes (washing, milling, centrifugation or pressing, decantation and/or filtering). This oil has an acidity content of below 1% acidity (legal requirement).

    2. How much does the flavour of Olive Oil vary?
    Like wine, Extra Virgin olive oils vary considerably. Their colour and flavour depends on the type of olives from which they are made and external factors such as climate, altitude and soil type.

    3. How many types of olive can you find?
    In Spain alone, more than 260 varieties of olive are grown. The most important varieties include: Picual, Hojiblanca, Abequina, Cornicabra, Empeltre, Blanqueta, Manzanilla, Manzanilla Cacereña, Verdial, Carrasqueña, Lechín and Gordal.

    4. What is the acidity content of Olive Oil?
    The acidity is one of the chemical parameters of Olive Oil which indicates the level of free fatty acids in the oil (expressed in % of oleic acid). The acidity is a chemical parameter. It does not necessarily determine the quality of the olives nor does it have an effect on the flavour. Low acidity indicates that a virgin olive oil has been made using healthy olives, produced under optimum conditions throughout its production.
    Extra Virgin Olive Oil – no more than 0.8 % acidity Virgin Olive Oil – no more than 2 % acidity
    Olive Oil – no more than 1 % acidity

    5. What is the best way to store Olive Oil?
    Olive oil should be stored in a cool place, at 15-20oC, and out of direct sunlight. Each oil should be consumed within a few month of purchase, as when young it is at its most flavoursome and nutritional. Most olive oils are sold in glass bottles, tins or plastic bottles. These types of containers are used because they help to keep the oil in its best condition.

    6. What is the best Olive Oil variety for salads, dips and dressings?
    The most popular for salads, dips and dressings is Extra Virgin olive oil, owing to its wide variety of flavours. This oil is perfect for dipping bread, and as an accompaniment or dressing for hot or cold food where you want the flavour of the oil to come out in the food.

    7. What are Infused Olive Oils?
    These are olive oils flavoured with herbs or spices such as basil or truffles. They are perfect for drizzling over salads or hot plates. Infused oils can easily be prepared at home, using Extra Virgin olive oil as the base oil.

    8. Which are the best Olive Oils for general cooking?
    All types of olive oil can be used in cooking, and enhance the flavours of a wide variety of ingredients. Olive oil is ideal for frying, dressings, pastas, rice dishes, grilling meat or fish, etc.

    9. Can Olive Oil be used to make desserts, cakes or breads?
    Yes. The Mediterranean Diet uses olive oil for sweet and savoury dishes. Olive oil is an indispensable ingredient for making a variety of breads, and combines perfectly with sweet ingredients such as chocolate.

    10. Where is Olive Oil produced?
    Spain, Italy and Greece are the principal producers in Europe. Europe produces 75% of the world’s olive oil. Olive oil has become a highly valued product wordwide owing to its links with the healthy Mediterranean lifestyle and its many culinary benefits and uses.

    Article source interprofesional de oliva

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    Olive Oil, the hero ingredient of the Mediterranean Diet • The acidity in olive oil does not affect the flavour; the acidity indicates the level of free fatty acids • Infused/flavoured olive oils can easily be prepared at home • Olive oil is an indispensable ingredient... 
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  • Uruguay becomes the latest Olive Oil producer country to join the IOC

    The International Olive Council is delighted to announce the entry of a new Member of the Organisation.

    After obtaining first-hand experience of the workings of the Council by attending a number of sessions as an observer, the Government of Uruguay filed its instrument of accession to the International Agreement on Olive Oil and Table Olives, 2005, on 30 July 2013. The accession was officially notified on 20 August by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of Spain, which is the depositary of the Agreement.

    Uruguay is the second South American country to join after Argentina did so in 2009. It is the latest addition to the IOC community, which hopes to see other olive producing nations follow soon in its tracks.

    Although a small olive growing nation, Uruguay will bring fresh perspective to the Organisation. Welcome on board!

    Sourrce International Olive Council

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    The International Olive Council is delighted to announce the entry of a new Member of the Organisation. After obtaining first-hand experience of the workings of the Council by attending a number of sessions as an observer, the Government of Uruguay filed its instrument of accession... 
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  • One of the eldest Olive Tree in the world, but the biggest for sure

    It is located in the village of Vuves, of Kolimpari municipality in Chania, Crete.

    With a circumference of 12.5 meters, 3.64 meters in diameter and a surface area of ​​11.45 m2, it’s consider the biggest Olive tree in the world.

    It is aged 2500 – 5000 years old. The importance of this Olive tree was highlighted in 1922 by the municipality member Mr. Polychronis Polichronidis and this Olive tree was declared a natural monument No. ap.105497/6459/1986 (656/TV/1986).

    The olive tree is in the backyard of the house of Karapatakis family and is a monument visited by hundreds of tourists every year.

    The age of the Olive tree can not be 100% determined, because the radioactive method can’t be applied, due to absence of inside wood material (kardioxilo). The absence of the inside wood material, consider as a result of the old age of the tree.

    The age of this Olive tree, can be approximately determined by the perimeter of the trunk. There is no other recorded tree with such girth so can the olive is to be declared as the eldest (?) of our planet and the biggest for sure.

    In the region have been discovered two cemeteries dated back to 700 B.C. suggestive of ancient cities, which were related to this Olive tree. There are also other ancient olive trees that reveal the existence of an ancient Olive grove.

    This Olive tree is up today luxuriant and fruitful.

    This specific Olive tree, was associated with the Olympic Games of Athens in 2004.
    The winner of the Marathon was crowned with a wreath (Kotinos) made of this Olive tree.

    The Kolimpari municipality suggested the embassy of China the winner of the Marathon of the 2008 Olympic Games to be crowned by a wreath from this Olive tree.

    Source all about olive oil blog

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    It is located in the village of Vuves, of Kolimpari municipality in Chania, Crete. With a circumference of 12.5 meters, 3.64 meters in diameter and a surface area of ​​11.45 m2, it’s consider the biggest Olive tree in the world. It is aged 2500 – 5000 years old.... 
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  • After a Recession in Portugal, the Tiny Green Fruits of Success

    Portugal is finding that increasing exports is the way to pull its economy out of a recession.

    For 127 years, Herdade de Manantiz has been producing olive oil, mostly for the domestic market. But having suffered through recession like thousands of other traditional businesses, it has started overhauling its operations and searching for customers outside Portugal.

    Previously, Manantiz had relied on rare rainfall to water its 30,000 olive trees, planted across 529 acres of parched land in one of southern Europe’s driest regions.

    In February, Manantiz installed its first irrigation system, an investment of 197,000 euros, or $263,000, that is meant to help quadruple production. In May, the company completed its first overseas sale — to a Brazilian retailer that bought 504 bottles of oil. It is pursuing buyers in Sweden and Japan for its oil made from galega olives, which are unique to Portugal.

    Over all, after falling about 9 percent in 2008 at the onset of the financial crisis, Portugal’s olive oil exports have more than doubled since, according to data from Casa do Azeite, an industry body. Last year alone, olive oil exports rose 20 percent.

    Mariana Matos, secretary general of Casa do Azeite, estimated that Portugal had added about 20,000 hectares of olive trees over the past five years, in part because of investors from countries like Spain, Italy and Switzerland.

    Manuel Costa Reis, an economist at Present Value Consulting in Lisbon, which advises Portuguese banks and other corporations on asset valuations, said that Portugal’s export competitiveness was “without a doubt a very surprising and positive outcome of this crisis.”
    “Portugal had been one of the losers in the globalization process because most of our industries were competing directly with the emerging markets,” he said.

    He said that the economic crisis had forced companies to start producing higher-quality products that can be marketed at a higher price. Manantiz is a good example of that. Its initial shipment of olive oil to Brazil sold at 60 reais, or nearly $26, a bottle, four times what is sells for in Portugal.

    Portuguese exports rose 6.2 percent in the second quarter from the comparable period in 2012, according to data this month from Portugal’s national statistics institute.

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    Portugal is finding that increasing exports is the way to pull its economy out of a recession. For 127 years, Herdade de Manantiz has been producing olive oil, mostly for the domestic market. But having suffered through recession like thousands of other traditional businesses,... 
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  • Israeli Olive Oil Comes of Age

    The modern olive-oil industry in Israel is fairly young, but producers are seeing brilliant results and rising recognition

    As more people around the world reach for a bottle of extra-virgin olive oil for dressing salads, frying, baking and even drinking, a revived ancient industry in Israel is getting attention in global markets and competitions.

    Interest in Israeli olive oil mirrors the burgeoning Israeli wine scene, but it’s a newer phenomenon, says Hilla Wenkert, an international olive-oil judge and owner of Olia, a concept store in Tel Aviv stocked with oils made of Leccino, Coratina, Koroneiki, Souri and other varieties grown in Israel.

    “People started to be more aware of their well-being and the health benefits of olive oil. It started as a trend, and now it’s part of daily life,” Wenkert tells ISRAEL21c.

    In the past few years, Israeli land devoted to modern olive groves has increased to some 330,000 dunams (81,000 acres) from a mere 2,000 dunams. Every year, between 15,000 and 16,000 tons of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) is produced. Only about 1,000 tons get exported – a tiny stream compared to Spanish and Italian oil.

    However, at the recent Summer Fancy Food Show in New York, distributors showed much interest in Israeli olive oil, says Wenkert.

    “The world is full of Italian, Spanish, Greek, Turkish, Moroccan and Tunisian olive oil, but most of it is lower quality because many people cannot afford the good stuff,” she says.

    Israeli EVOO rates as the “good stuff” for which discriminating consumers are willing to pay more. Israel’s growers and oil producers work with agricultural researchers on methods to yield premium unrefined extra virgin. “Virgin” means it comes from the first pressing, while “extra” signifies low acidity, both critical factors in a high-quality oil.

    “Virgin oil is a fresh fruit juice, while refined is an industrial product,” says Zohar Kerem, a food chemist specializing in olives at the Hebrew University’s Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition. Though refined oil is cheaper, flavor and health benefits are lost in the process, he tells ISRAEL21c.

    From the tree to the stone’

    Argentinean émigré Moshe Spak decided it’s high time Israeli olive oil got its due.

    “Everyone knows about Israeli expertise in other areas, but not about olive-oil quality,” says Spak, founder and director of the Terra Olivo Mediterranean International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition in Israel, founded four years ago.

    The 2013 contest, judged by an international panel of 25 expert tasters, drew 489 entries from 21 countries. The overall Israeli champion was a Picholine variety from Meshek Achiya.

    Several factors account for the exceptional profile of Israeli olive oil, Kerem explains.

    First, most Israeli olives are irrigated with salty (brackish) and purified wastewater. This adds natural fertilizers to the soil and does not compromise the fruit’s quality.

    Second, harvesting is completed within the ideal window of October to December. In many other countries, the process goes on through March, when olives are past their prime.

    Israeli growers do not store the fruit for long before extracting the oil, abiding by an old Arab aphorism in the industry: “From the tree to the stone.”

    “That means when you want to make good olive oil, the sooner you get the detached olives to the mill the better the oil you will get,” says Kerem.

    Finally, whereas in most other olive-oil-producing countries only regional native strains are grown, Israel’s farmers learned how to make cultivars from other Mediterranean countries flourish here. Differences between varieties can be vast.

    “If you want to be a gourmet, you have one olive oil for salad, one for baking, one for frying and one for cooking,” Kerem says. Scientists from the Ministry of Agriculture’s Volcani Center work on issues such as optimizing the date of harvest to get the specific properties that Kerem’s team is seeking.

    Boutique olive farms

    Both wine and olive oil were produced in the Middle East thousands of years ago and continued on a small scale to the present day. Israelis have propelled these industries into the modern age with cutting-edge research and technology.

    Reuven Birger, the Israel Ministry of Agriculture’s chief specialist for olives and almonds, tells ISRAEL21c that the invention of drip irrigation enabled Israeli farmers to begin planting dense olive groves in the early 1990s. These groves now account for at least 10,000 tons of Israel’s annual supply of olive oil.

    “If we depend on rain, each tree needs a lot of area to thrive. More densely planted trees have greater yields,” Birger says.

    It takes approximately 1,000 olives to make a liter of oil.

    Birger says Israel has several large producers, about 150 boutique producers and at least 100 small farms that sell their olives directly to producer-retailers such as Olia and Pereg. Some of the boutique oils have been picking up prestigious medals at Terra Olivo and at international competitions in Japan and Argentina.

    “We have our own specific taste in Israel,” says Wenkert, who likes experimenting with blends. “Compared to, let’s say, Greek or Italian oils that are smooth and fruity and quite aromatic, ours are more pungent and a little more aggressive. I think it’s because of the water, the soil and the specific climate here.”

    During harvest time, Wenkert travels around looking for new varieties. Olia’s “library” includes a new mild organic oil for babies and toddlers, as well as a line produced from olives grown by Israeli singing star Yuval Banai, who several years ago began his own farm in the countryside.

    Like Banai, Israeli city-dwellers sometimes move north or south to try their hand at agriculture, says Wenkert. Olives are a good choice for first-time farmers because professional expertise is readily available to them.

    “People here really have something emotional toward olive trees,” Wenkert observes. “It’s part of their tradition. Even on Tel Aviv roofs, the most popular tree is the olive tree. It’s very symbolic and beautiful.”

    Inside Olia concept store in Tel Aviv. Photo by Abigail Klein Leichman

    Article source Israeli voice

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    The modern olive-oil industry in Israel is fairly young, but producers are seeing brilliant results and rising recognition As more people around the world reach for a bottle of extra-virgin olive oil for dressing salads, frying, baking and even drinking, a revived ancient industry... 
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  • Recipe: Potato, baby spinach and griddled spring onion with Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    Serves six

    For the dressing:

    150ml (5floz) buttermilk
    ½ tsp Dijon mustard
    3 tbsp mayonnaise
    For the salad:
    500g (1lb 2oz) small new potatoes
    12 spring onions
    Extra Virgin Olive Oil, for brushing
    125g (4½oz) baby spinach

    To make the dressing, mix all the ingredients together with some pepper.
    Boil the potatoes and drain. Return to the pan and cover to keep warm – they don’t have to be served hot but it’s nice if they’re slightly warm.

    Trim the spring onions and remove any yellowing or imperfect leaves. Brush them with olive oil. Heat a griddle pan and cook the onions on both sides. Start off on a high heat to get charring marks and then turn down the heat and cook until they are tender (but not so far that they are floppy).

    Put the warm potatoes, spinach leaves and spring onions into a broad shallow bowl. Season and drizzle on as much dressing as needed – it should be generous without drowning the salad. Put the rest into a jug and offer on the side.

    Serve this potato salad, tossed in a buttermilk dressing, with roast meat for a hassle-free garden lunch.

    Recipe source

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    Serves six For the dressing: 150ml (5floz) buttermilk ½ tsp Dijon mustard 3 tbsp mayonnaise For the salad: 500g (1lb 2oz) small new potatoes 12 spring onions Extra Virgin Olive Oil, for brushing 125g (4½oz) baby spinach To make the dressing, mix all the ingredients together... 
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  • Aerosol Packaging Solution for Olive Oil from German Lindal Group

    The popularity of the Mediterranean Diet, combined with consumers seeking convenience, product purity and value, is driving growth of one of the many bright spots in the acceleration of innovative aerosol-based foods – the olive oil submarket – and, subsequently, usage of the Lindal Group Cozy actuator, with oil insert.

    View suppliers of similar products in the Packaging Network. “Already, major brands such as Bertolli have successfully created aerosol olive oils using our Cozy model, plus oil insert,” said Philip Brand, Global Marketing Director for Lindal Group, a leader in aerosol packaging.

    “Bertolli launched a three-SKU line of Extra Virgin Spray Originals and many other brands have the system under consideration, for a variety of reasons.” Carbonell, Spain’s olive oil market leader, is on-board with the Lindal Group platform, with brands such as Heritage, Carapelli, Hojiblanca, Koipe, Koipesol, Sasso, Louit, Friol and Maya.

    The Spanish contract filler is Maeva. Brand said that the Lindal solution is easy for consumers to use and is handy for cold dishes, such as salads, vegetables and pastas, mainstays of the Mediterranean Diet. “Accurate, sparing, 360-degree operation, plus long-lasting, fresh flavor are assured,” Brand said.

    “The market potential is unlimited and the consumer is primed for innovation in this category.” According to Lindal Group executives, the global market for olive oil is exploding and is one of the food industry’s fastest growing segments. In the relatively mature U.S. market alone, olive oil consumption is expected to more than double by 2020.

    Besides consumption leaders Spain, Italy and the U.S., olive oil consumption in China has grown 70 percent a year for the last decade. In fact, industry reports state that China, Japan and India will soon be on the list of largest worldwide olive oil consumers.

    Much of the growth in mature olive oil markets is driven by Millennials who, as a demographic group, are open to new packaging platforms, such as aerosol, and are less locked into traditional consumption methodologies.

    Olive oil packaging has not changed in decades and shelf-life stability of bottled oils and larger cans represents a flavor and quality issue. This confluence of factors has industry observers agreeing that the time is right for a new packaging platform in the category. Important, too, is the fact that aerosol-packaged olive oils are pure.

    The oil itself is separated from the propellant and protected from light and air – the
    enemies of longevity — thus enhancing flavor as well as hygienic appeal.

    Further, aerosol olive oils allow precise, efficient usage for Mediterranean style recipes. “And, as with other aerosol-based foods we supply, the spray olive oils are a delight to use,” said Brand.

    The LINDAL Group is a worldwide leader in the development and manufacture
    of valves, actuators and spray caps for aerosol products and is renowned for
    its innovative packaging solutions.

    Lindal Group Headquarters St. Annenufer 2 | 20457 Hamburg, Germany
    Tel: 49 (0)40 200075-100
    Fax: 49 (0)40 200075-222
    Email: info@lindalgroup.com
    Website: www.lindalgroup.com

    Article source packagingeurope

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    The popularity of the Mediterranean Diet, combined with consumers seeking convenience, product purity and value, is driving growth of one of the many bright spots in the acceleration of innovative aerosol-based foods – the olive oil submarket – and, subsequently, usage... 
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  • Top judges for Olive Oil section at Australian Gawler Show

    For the 157th year – one of the longest running in the state, if not the country – the Gawler Show is an affordable, fun and exciting two day event.

    Olives South Australia is again supporting the annual Gawler Show, providing expert judges to taste and award entries in this year’s Olive Oil section.

    The judging panel will be lead by internationally-trained olive oil taster Trudie Michels, who previously headed the blending team at renowned olive oil producer Red Island.

    Trudie recently conducted a sell-out olive oil tasting masterclass at the Adelaide showgrounds, attended by a diverse range of people interested in food and the nuances of quality extra virgin olive oil.

    Gawler show organisers are confident of an increase in entries in the olive oil section.

    Producers could enter olive oils in categories for micro (less than 50l) small (50-200l) and large (over 200l) production, with a fourth class for table olive or other products.

    The show is open from 9am this Saturday to 8.30pm, which includes the popular fireworks display, and on Sunday from 9am to 5pm.

    Entry is $15 for adults, $13 concession, $8 children under 16-years (pre-school free).

    A family ticket for two adults and three children is $45.

    Make sure to get down to Gawler Show for one of the days, for another treasured experience.

    Source barossaherald

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    For the 157th year – one of the longest running in the state, if not the country – the Gawler Show is an affordable, fun and exciting two day event. Olives South Australia is again supporting the annual Gawler Show, providing expert judges to taste and award entries in... 
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  • The EU-funded project EUROLIVE

    Olive oil is good for you – in more ways than one
    [Date: 2013-08-27]
    Olive oil is a key component of the Mediterranean diet and is considered by many to be a natural health-food product. Until recently, the known protective effects of olive oil against oxidative stress-associated diseases, such as cardiovascular, cancer, or neurodegenerative diseases, had been attributed to its high monounsaturated fat content.

    The EU-funded project EUROLIVE (‘The effect of olive oil consumption on oxidative damage in European populations’) investigated whether there might be other chemical factors contributing to the documented beneficial health effects of olive oil.

    In particular, project partners, led by researchers at the Mar Institute of Medical Research in Barcelona, wanted to know if olive oil rich in phenolic compounds, such as virgin olive oil, would have particular health benefits beyond those already established for olive oil in general.

    The researchers did six clinical trials in which 200 healthy volunteers were given 25 millilitres per day of three similar olive oils for three weeks. The olive oils had different polyphenol content. The dose was similar to the amount typically ingested daily in Mediterranean countries.

    The results showed that the higher the polyphenolic content of the olive oil consumed, the higher the increase in HDL cholesterol levels (so-called good cholesterol).

    Positive effects were also recorded for the atherogenic index – the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol, and the oxidative damage of lipids decreased in a linear manner with olive oil polyphenolic content. Lipid oxidation is considered a high risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease.

    Finally, the results of the EUROLIVE project demonstrated that consuming 25 millilitres of olive oil per day, in place of other fats, did not lead to participants gaining weight.

    For many, these results put an end to the debate over the antioxidant properties of olive oil polyphenols when consumed, and confirm the added value of virgin olive oil as opposed to other oils in protecting against cardiovascular disease and other risk factors.

    EUROLIVE received EUR 1.9 million in EU funding. The researchers completed their work in December 2004.

    Source cordis.europa.eu
    For more information, please visit:

    Project factsheet

    Mar Institute of Medical Research

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    Olive oil is good for you – in more ways than one [Date: 2013-08-27] Olive oil is a key component of the Mediterranean diet and is considered by many to be a natural health-food product. Until recently, the known protective effects of olive oil against oxidative stress-associated... 
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  • The cost to produce one kilo of olive oil in Spain reach 2.47 euros

    The Observatory of Prices and Markets of the Commission of Agriculture considers that the average cost to produce one kilogram of olive oil in the dry land olive grove not mecanizable, that represents more than 70 % of the cultivation in Andalusia and in Cordova, amounts to 2,47 euros. This value, which has been fixed by the Meeting of Andalusia after a survey realized to the sector in the campaign 2010/2011, leaves the price in three of the last four campaigns below the threshold of the profitability with clarity. Except in the current harvest, in which this value has excelled itself for the low production that has registered, the production costs have been over the quotation that the olive ones have obtained on the markets. Of the economic(economical) results had not been for the important helps of the Common Agricultural policy (PAC) they had been ruinous in the last agricultural exercises.

    In its study, the Commission of Agriculture distinguishes between three types of olive groves to fix the production costs: dry land olive grove not mecanizable, whose(which) investment to obtain one kilo of oil is located in 2,47 euros; dry land olive grove mecanizable, that goes down in costs to 1,93 euros; and of extensive irrigation, which needs an investment for 1,59 euros.

    In its report, the Board indicates that the main expense in the olive grove of rainfed machineable is labor, which corresponds to the practice of pruning of the olive grove. To get a kilo of oil will require 1.31 euros, which represents 53% of all expenditures. Minors are the chapters on fertilization (0.33 euros), soil management (0.29 ), phytosanitary treatments (0.25 ) and collection and transport (0.27 ). The direct costs amount to 2.44 euros, to what we need to add 0.03 euros in taxes and general expenses. In this latter concept will include repairs to roads or gullies.

    Article source diariocordoba

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    The Observatory of Prices and Markets of the Commission of Agriculture considers that the average cost to produce one kilogram of olive oil in the dry land olive grove not mecanizable, that represents more than 70 % of the cultivation in Andalusia and in Cordova, amounts to 2,47... 
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  • Greek olive oil making a splash, but Greek olive oil producers see untapped potential

    The nostalgia for olive groves and barrels of olive oil has taken on new meaning in crisis-hit Greece. Recently, there has been an exponential increase in interest for olive processing and olive oil marketing.

    “People between the ages of 20 and 45 are looking for new career paths, and they often turn toward our national product: olive oil,” Yiannis Karvelas, an educator and organizer of olive oil seminars, told Kathimerini. “It’s a realistic choice since olive trees can be found across the country,” he added.

    Efthimios Christakis, who exports Greek olive oil to German-speaking countries told Kathimerini: “Every day I receive invitations from at least 10 olive oil manufacturers, all of whom are interested in exporting their oil.

    “Poor crops in Spain this year, which saw a one-third drop in the harvest, proved favorable for Greece, which increased its penetration into the market by approximately 10 percent.”

    “It’s encouraging that budding olive oil producers are looking to get relevant training and knowledge on this issue,” said Karvelas.

    In fact, a few days ago, a number of manufacturers convened at a nationwide conference on exporting olive oil. Some attendees even went a step further.

    “We have Greek manufacturers who take part in international olive oil competitions, and this type of publicity is necessary for Greece,” Karvelas noted.

    Greek manufacturers are participating in renowned international competitions like the Mario Solinas, TerraOlivo in Israel, Olive Japan and the New York International Olive Oil Competition.

    “Plenty of Greeks have ventured into the international market and are exporting Greek olive oil even to Latin America,” Karvelas added.

    Manufacturers Kostas Balafas and George Dimarakis have earned six top honors for their extra-virgin olive oil, Moria Elea Deluxe, which comprises the Manaki and Koroneiki olive varieties. It was named the premier product in New York’s 2013 competition and was awarded the Grand Prestige Gold Award in Israel.

    But their success had nothing to do with luck. Balafas and Dimarakis trained for two years, learning everything they could about the product and its production.

    “We enrolled in olive production seminars at the Syngrou Estate, worked together with professors from the agricultural university, spoke with chefs and foodies, and we traveled a lot,” Balafas told Kathimerini.

    “Olive oil should be introduced to the Asian diet, from which it is absent. It should also establish itself as a gourmet product, and not just an ingredient.”

    Balafas also deems it necessary to dispel certain myths.

    “An expensive product does not mean large profits,” he explained, adding that consumers should “look not just at the product’s final cost, but also its production costs and the quantities that are ultimately sold.” Today, Balafas’s company exports 80 percent of its product to 12 countries.

    Manufacturers Kostas Balafas (photo) and George Dimarakis have earned six top honors for their extra-virgin olive oil, Moria Elea Deluxe.

    However, there are problems with the Greek olive oil market. The sale of Greek olive oil to Italy, which exports double the amount it produces, is still common practice.

    “It is estimated that 20 to 30 percent of the so-called Italian olive oil on German shelves is actually Greek,” said Christakis.

    At the same time, there is also large-scale disagreement among manufacturers regarding the technical means through which the oil is produced.

    “Amid all the panic caused by the crisis, everyone is trying to perfect their packaging without trying to improve the quality of their product,” said Christakis, noting that the Italians used the same tactic, but have now abandoned it.

    Greek olive oil is also facing a identity crisis.

    “We need to explain to foreign consumers why it’s worth choosing Greek olive oil, rather than Italian or Spanish. We need to make it clear why we are different.”

    Article by Ioanna Fotiadi from kathimerini

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    The nostalgia for olive groves and barrels of olive oil has taken on new meaning in crisis-hit Greece. Recently, there has been an exponential increase in interest for olive processing and olive oil marketing. “People between the ages of 20 and 45 are looking for new career... 
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  • Farmers' Market recipe: Greek Panzanella with Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    GREEK PANZANELLA

    Serves 6 to 8

    3 to 5 tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
    1 loaf sourdough bread, cut in 1-inch cubes
    Salt
    1 cucumber, seeded, sliced 1/4 inch thick
    1 red and 1 yellow bell pepper, seeded, diced
    1 pint grape tomatoes, halved
    1/2 red onion, sliced
    1/2 pound crumbled feta
    1/2 cup sliced Kalamata olives

    Vinagrette:

    2 cloves garlic, minced
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
    1/4 cup red wine vinegar
    1 teaspoon sea salt
    Coarsely ground black pepper, to taste
    1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

    Preparation:

    1. In a large saute pan over medium heat, heat 3 tablespoons olive oil until shimmering. Add bread cubes and sprinkle with salt; cook, tossing frequently, until golden brown, 5 to 10 minutes. You may need to add more oil.

    2. In a large salad bowl, toss the cucumber, peppers, tomatoes and red onion.

    3. For the vinaigrette, whisk the garlic, oregano, mustard, vinegar, salt and pepper. Whisk in olive oil to make an emulsion.

    4. Pour vinaigrette over vegetables. Add feta, olives and bread cubes; toss gently. Let sit for 30 minutes, then serve.

    Recipe courtesy of Kayti Mangan of Fremont source

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    GREEK PANZANELLA Serves 6 to 8 3 to 5 tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1 loaf sourdough bread, cut in 1-inch cubes Salt 1 cucumber, seeded, sliced 1/4 inch thick 1 red and 1 yellow bell pepper, seeded, diced 1 pint grape tomatoes, halved 1/2 red onion, sliced 1/2 pound crumbled... 
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  • Olive oil producers are concerned about the UK’s traffic-light food labelling system

    Olive oil producers and other European food industry members have said they’re concerned about the UK’s traffic-light food labelling system because their products would be labelled as unhealthy.

    But nutrition labels are seen in some circles as important in providing dietary information to help consumers make informed healthy food choices. Labels may be the only source of nutritional information available to the consumer at the point of purchase, therefore it’s important the information is easy to find, read, interpret and understand.

    More than 130 UK food businesses now display display nutrition information voluntarily. Currently four main formats are used in the UK, and these have many hybrids.

    Over the past decade, many studies investigating consumer understanding of nutrition labelling have been carried out in the UK and the Food Standards Agency (FSA) led a series of studies in 2009-10 with consumers and industry stakeholders to consider the standardisation of labelling on front of packs.

    This led to the key elements considered important by consumers: guideline daily amounts (GDA), traffic light colours, nutritional values as text, standardised portion sizes and values per 100g.

    In June 2010 the European Parliament backed a proposal for more uniform food labelling in the European Union. They rejected the traffic light colour coding system, opting instead for GDAs for front of pack nutrition labelling in line with the majority of current food industry practice in the UK and Europe.

    Now, we finally seem to have got agreement in the UK, and for the first time the major retailers are working with the FSA and Department of Health and have come up with an agreed front of pack labeling system.

    GDAs will be replaced by reference intakes and detailed industry specific guidelines have been prepared, with defined limits of what may be considered a low, medium and high with different cut off points for food and drinks.

    The UK food industry has been preparing for this move for a number of years and has been busy reformulating products so that they are less in the red zone, for example using salt substitutes in foods and the addition of sugar substitutes to fizzy drinks.

    And with the amount of information that supermarkets have on our shopping habits, it can’t be too long before they are using data analytics from labelling information to help steer us in healthier directions.

    But it’s not completely straightforward. For example, olive oil, despite it being widely considered as a healthy choice because it’s high in unsaturated fats, would still be labelled with a red light.

    Other products such as cheese and butter would also come under red. Tthe guidance recognises this and notes that these and other products such as nuts and oily fish will have a red light due to the presence of naturally occurring fats. It is recommended that these products state the amount of saturated fats, to indicate to consumers the balance of fats and also highlight particular benefits of their products in line with EU Health claims.

    Whether we chose to differentiate between different red light foods remains to be seen. We are human after all.

    Article “Some food will always get a red light (but we can still eat it)”source theconversation

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    Olive oil producers and other European food industry members have said they’re concerned about the UK’s traffic-light food labelling system because their products would be labelled as unhealthy. But nutrition labels are seen in some circles as important in providing dietary... 
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  • Australian Olive Oil Producer Success Story

    Justine George, “Tanglewood”, Moonbi, has taken a different approach to olive oil production, working on a biennial fruit cropping system to maximise production.

    FRESH is best for Moonbi olive oil producer Justine George, “Tanglewood”.
    Mrs George and her husband David produce olive oil at their 400-tree grove north of Tamworth and recently won best oil by a local producer at the NSW Northern Olive Oil Show, as well as picking up bronze and silver medals for their products.

    Mrs George said freshness was a key part of what made their oil special – after being handpicked by the George family, the olives can be at the processing plant in nearby Limbri on the same day and that translated into better quality, fresher oil.

    “The fruit’s not sitting around getting damaged,” she said.

    “A lot of people have a lot of cartage and then the crop has to wait in line to be processed and that’s where the quality drops.”

    The Georges produce extra virgin oil which is sold at local markets and at events such as Sydney Royal.

    She said a bit of herself and her family went into every bottle.

    “Being boutique, we’re very hands-on and probably very labour intensive,” she said.

    “I like that, because I can see it from the moment it’s on the tree to the time we pick it, grade it and send it off.”

    The Georges have used commercial harvesters in the past but have gone back to picking the olives by hand, using small rakes and caught in nets.

    While son Conrad said the picking could be “tedious”, Mrs George said it was good old-fashioned (mandatory) family fun.

    Mrs George then grades the fruit, checking for any impurities or imperfections.

    Leaves are removed, the fruit is crated and sent for processing where it is washed in tepid water to be cleaned of any dust.

    The fruit is then pressed and the oil left to stand for at least two months to allow olive fragments to settle.

    The resulting oil is stored in stainless steel containers before it is taken back to “Tanglewood” to be bottled.

    She said correct storage was one of the most important aspects of the oil making process.

    “Olive oil will absorb anything you put with it – it’s amazing like that,” she said.

    “So even in storage, you need to make sure no light or air gets to it.”

    She said the oil would store well for up to two years but was best consumed within three months of harvest.

    Olive trees at the “Tanglewood” grove were 15 years old and were irrigated in September most years.

    “Olive trees are pretty special because as they bear fruit one year the new growth has already started for the next year, so you need water not just to produce the fruit for the current year but also to encourage the next crop,” Mrs George said.

    The amount of water used depended on the season and the look of the trees – whether they’re stressed or whether they’re healthy, she said.

    The biennial growing cycle of olives meant many Australian groves in which trees were all the same age produced good yields of fruit one year followed by virtually none the next.

    Mrs George said she was trying to overcome the “feast or famine” scenario by pruning trees so half would bear fruit one year and the other half the following.

    While the operation was not organically certified, Mrs George said she tried to avoid the use of chemicals.

    The trees begin flowering about five months before harvest which begins in April and can last until June.

    Harvesting for a period of several months gave the oil different tastes, dependent on what point in the growing cycle the fruit was harvested, Mrs George said.

    “We like a softer, fruity oil so we tend to do a late harvest,” she said.

    “We get more mature fruit so you have to be more gentle with it.”

    Fruit from earlier harvests tended to make punchier, more pungent

    oils.

    The Georges’ oil is predominantly made from Frantoio olives which Mrs George said had been “magnificent” this year, yielding 27 per cent oil.

    Kalamata olives were also grown at “Tanglewood”.

    A damaging hail storm late last year coupled with fast maturing fruit meant production was down from a normal annual yield of between 600 to 800 litres to just 300L this season.

    Article source TheLand

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    Justine George, “Tanglewood”, Moonbi, has taken a different approach to olive oil production, working on a biennial fruit cropping system to maximise production. FRESH is best for Moonbi olive oil producer Justine George, “Tanglewood”. Mrs George and her husband... 
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  • Argentina: Olive Oil & Olive Cultivation review

    Argentina olive oil production

    Argentina now has more than 100,000 hectares of modern olive groves for oil extraction. They have genetic plantations from the best nurseries in the world, armed cadres monovarietal 250-330 plants / ha and pressurized irrigation. Added to this two major advantages to the counter and the ability to produce increasing volumes of high quality virgin oils that may be classified by variety. The country produces low cost high quality olive oils and is definitely shaping up as one of the next global market leaders.

    For the year 2010, when the entire area planted in late 2000 enter into production, the country could produce between 45,000 and 50,000 tons. olive oil. Moreover, the potential production of Argentina could reach 200,000 tons. olive oil.

    Domestic production has 2 major advantages to the counter and the ability to produce large quantities of virgin oil of excellent quality that will be classified by variety.

    Argentina would become the main oil production center outside the varietal source areas for them. In particular: Arbequina, Coratina, Barnea, Picual and Frantoio.

    The increased production and changing the fate of the oil produced changes in the qualities of the oil produced: there is a clear trend towards the production of fruity extra virgin olive oils and varietals.

    From IOC Newsletter:
    Argentina joined the ranks of the IOC Members three years ago. Since it will be hosting the 18th extraordinary session of the Council in Buenos Aires from 2 to 6 July 2012, this month’s issue of the newsletter focuses on olive growing in this Latin American country.

    Argentina offers excellent natural conditions for the development of olive cultivation. Two yardsticks can be used to measure its potential: the exponential growth in the number of advanced genetics trees and the growth in Argentine exports, particularly to the two key markets of the United States and Brazil. The Argentine olive industry saw a revival in the 1990s when new orchards were established with a range of varieties.

    Olives are cultivated on more than 100 000 ha of land, concentrated in the tree regions-55 000 ha in the North-West region (provinces of Catamarca, La Rioja); over 9 500 ha in the Central region (provinces of Cordoba and Buenos Aires); and 40 000 ha in the Central-West region (provinces of Mendoza and San Juan) with 40 000 ha- which have been joined recently by Neuquen. The bulk of the olive produced in Argentina is extra virgin grade. The industry provides direct employment for more than 15 000 people and an estimated 45 000 indirect jobs.
    argentina_oliveoil_export

    Graph I shows how production, consumption, imports and exports have evolved over the last 20 years. Olive oil production has risen sharply in the last ten seasons (2000/01-2010/11)* albeit more in relative terms than absolute terms (+275%=+11 000 t). However, in the last four crop years it has not managed to top the level recorded in 2007/08 (27 000 t). Exports have shot up by 175% in the last decade. The main destinations are the United States (50% of all Argentine exports), followed by Brazil (40%) and Uruguay and Chile. Eighty percent of exports are of bulk product while the remaining 20% is packed. Consumption has dropped by 17% over the last 10 crop years. This decrease expands to 39% when the averages for the last two decades are compared.

    Table olive production has also experienced constant growth, rising from 30 000 t in 2000/01 to 250 000 t in 2010/11. According to industry sources, this increase can be attributed to the entry into crop production of new orchards established in the 1990s. Brazil is the top destination, followed by the United States. Others noteworthy destinations for Argentine table olive exports are Venezuela, Canada, Uruguay and Chile. Table olive consumption has soared by 180% in the last 10 years, rising from 12 500 t in 2000/01 to 35 000 t in 2010/11, moving in the opposite direction to olive oil consumption.

    Scrutiny of the developments in the both branches of the industry reveals that the downturn in olive oil production as of 2008/09 can very probably be explained in part by orchard conversion to production for table olives.

    source International Olive Council

     

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    Argentina olive oil production Argentina now has more than 100,000 hectares of modern olive groves for oil extraction. They have genetic plantations from the best nurseries in the world, armed cadres monovarietal 250-330 plants / ha and pressurized irrigation. Added to this two... 
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  • Olive Oil Market Report 2013

    At the biginning of the 2013 the stocks in Spain added up to ca. 755,000 tons. The prices had developed down in the previous months as the consumption in March was just to 68,000 tons (March 2012: 110,000 tons). In April, the consumption increased to 82,000 tons. And in the coming months are amounts expected of about 90,000 – 100,000 tons, especially as the stocks in Greece, Tunisia, Morocco will run out and the Italian consumers have started to buy in Spain again. This has resulted in the price trend, which has reversed.

    Currently, it is still a bit early to estimate precisely the coming harvest above all because of increased rainfall and an unusually cold spring. Due to this situation a late harvest is to be expected. For Spain is an oil production about 1,300,000 tons for the harvest 2013/2014 estimated. Certainly, it is believed that the other olive oil producing countries are going to crop up to 30 % less. This is attributable to the strong Scirocco Winds, which has a large part of the Cretan blooming affected.

    We assume that the price level will remain constant until the recent harvest in November. The qualities are rather mixed, hence it is expected to have surcharge for good sensory commodities surcharge for good sensory commodities.

    source hees.de

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    At the biginning of the 2013 the stocks in Spain added up to ca. 755,000 tons. The prices had developed down in the previous months as the consumption in March was just to 68,000 tons (March 2012: 110,000 tons). In April, the consumption increased to 82,000 tons. And in the... 
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  • Israel's olive growers urge Agriculture Ministry to delay imports from Jordan

    Local growers fear olive imports will cause excess in the market and as a result the local crops may not be fully used.

    As the harvest season approaches, Israel’s olive farmers are asking the Agriculture Ministry to delay plans to import olives from Jordan.

    There will likely be excess demand for olives this year, beyond what Israel grows itself, so industrial olive growers aren’t opposed to the planned imports per se, said Zvi Alon, head of the Plants Production and Marketing Board. The question is when.

    Manufacturers of preserved olives want imports to start in September, to minimize the chance of running out of raw olives. But the farmers fear that instead of a lack, this may cause an excess of olives in Israel’s market, and as a result the local crops may not be fully used. They want the import postponed until October.

    The Agriculture Ministry recently estimated that this year’s olive crop will come in 6,000 to 9,000 tons short of demand. Israel’s olive industry uses 17,000 tons of olives.

    Alon called for allowing olive imports in September only if it turns out that Israel’s crop is not meeting the industry’s needs.

    Israel has a trade agreement with Jordan that allows for importing fruits and vegetables duty-free based on Israel’s market needs. The Agriculture Ministry decides when certain produce items are lacking, and decides on imports in order to keep local prices stable.

    The Agriculture Ministry stated in response that it takes growers, industry and consumers into account, noting that this year’s harvest was likely to be smaller than last year’s.

    Article source haaretz

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    Local growers fear olive imports will cause excess in the market and as a result the local crops may not be fully used. As the harvest season approaches, Israel’s olive farmers are asking the Agriculture Ministry to delay plans to import olives from Jordan. There will likely... 
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